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Is this pot stainless steel? How can you tell? [PICS]

I found this pot in the closet and I love that it has the integrated strainer.

It doesn't say it is stainless steel.

Is it unlikely to be? If not, what material?

How can I tell?

I don't want to cook in aluminum.

Please take a guess!

Thanks,
Mike

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  1. From the general appearance and shine, I'd say it's Stainless. Wegmans sells a number of stock pots and pasta pots. You can look on their site; you might even find your pot.

    1. It certainly looks like stainless. I have a similar pot, a real El Cheapo, not from Wegmans, and it is stainless.

      1. Yes, it is always certainly stainless steel surface. I highly doubt this aluminum. When an aluminum cookware age, its "stains" look different than those of stainless steel. So based on your first photo, your pot looks to have these stainless steel stains.

        Moreover, it will be highly unlikely that Wegmans sells aluminum pots.

        Finally, if you really want to try, try this. Put a magnet next to your pot, most likely you will feel attraction force. This will mean it is steel or stainless steel.

        12 Replies
        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          Chem nailed it...put a magnet next to it. Baddaboombaddabing...you have your answer.

          1. re: wabi

            Yes, most stainless is magnetic, but not all stainless is magnetic, so that's not as sure a deal as it might seem. That's why some, SS clad pots don't work on induction ranges. With that warning, it certianly looks like stainless construction, no question about the pasta insert, you can see the thickness and no way aluminum is going to be that thin and hold up.

            1. re: mikie

              The shiny top of the strainer insert is much more magnetic than the outer surface of the main pot. Interesting!

              1. re: mike2401

                The main pot is probably made of a less magnetic stainless steel than the insert. Not all stainless steels are the same. However, most stainless steels can be magnetized to a small extend. Aluminum is essentially none (at least anything you have in the kitchen). So, as long as you can barely feel any magnetic attraction, then it means the pot is stainless (or at least has steel) in it.

                Also, aluminum is much lighter than stainless steel (about 3 times lighter). If you have ever held an aluminum pot, you would tell very easily.

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                  In contrast, I am so unhappy with this purchase I'm going to toss it in the trash:

                  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009...

                  Interestingly, it is very magnetic (very very).

                  It wears / stains very differently. What can you tell by looking at these photos:

                   
                   
                   
                  1. re: mike2401

                    Well, it seems to oxidize (not rust) very easily. It is still a functional cookware, so you can use either use it for something else or just give it away.

                    <Interestingly, it is very magnetic (very very).>

                    If you ever shop for flatware, you will noticed that many flatware (spoons, knives and forks) are classified using an older system. You will see: 18/0, 18/8, 18/10.

                    18/0 (0% nickel) is actually the most magnetic of the three, but also the one which is most easy to stain. 18/10 (with 10% nickel) is least magnetic of the three, and the most rust resistance.

                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                      Awesome answer @Chemicalkinetics . VERY COOL!!!

                      I guess I just need to decide if I want nickel in my cookware :-)

                      I don't know what the pro's & con's are, and if there are any claimed health features or consequences.

                        1. re: mike2401

                          Are you talking abot flatware? If so, then 18/10 is the best for shine, however, 18/0 isn't as likely to mar tableware. But, it won't have the sparkle of 18/10 and isn't as "stainless". Pots and pans, are different and have different requirements. I don't think any of the pot and pan manufacturers are using the 18/0 - 18/10 nomenclature now. At least not the major brands.

                          1. re: mike2401

                            <What's better: 18/0, 18/8, 18/10 ???>

                            It depends what you want. 18/10 gives you the best shine as Mikie said. 18/10 is also more rust/oxidation resistance than 18/0. However, 18/10 is not very good for strength. Even for the high end 18/10 cutlery, the blades of the dining knives are not made of 18/10.

                            If you want your cookware to stay as shiny as possible and as stainless as possible, then the 18/10 or 18/8 is better. However, you won't want your dining knives or kitchen knives made of 18/10. Because 18/10 is the least magnetic, it alone is not sufficient for magnetic induction cooktop.

                            mikie (not mike2401),

                            Many coowkare manufacturers still speak in these languages because it is easier to related to customers. Of course, the fun thing is that they only refer 18/10 and never 18/0. Here is a picture where All Clad states that the interior stainless steel is the high price 18/10, but it won't mention the exterior stainless steel other than "induction stainlesss steel".

                            http://www.cookswarehouse.com/skin/fr...

                            http://www.eclecticcook.com/wp-conten...

                            Tramontina also uses these terms. Demyere as well:

                            http://www.demeyere.be/snippets/2299/...

                              1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                I just bought a Demeyere and didn't even notice the reference to 18/10 SS. Wasn't looking for it I guess. Good catch.

              2. No guesswork involved. As others have noted, and for all the reasons they've given, it is clearly stainless.

                Photos 2 and 3 would, by themselves, remove all doubt. If there were any, which there isn't.