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Italian foie gras?

Is there a foie gras equivalence in Italian cuisine? If so, what should I look for in a menu?

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  1. Your question got me curious, so I checked a couple of menus (Metamorfosi and Glass in Rome) and, on their Italian menus, "foie gras" simply appears as "foie gras."

    1. I have seen and ordered Pâté di Fegato d'Oca, that is puréed Goose Liver, in restaurants in the Veneto. Most always it was very tasty!!

      1. Hi Carcassone-

        It is known as FEGATO GRASSO in Italian.

        You find it in the Lombardia and Piedmontese regions, but compared to France it plays a much smaller part in Italian gastronomy.

        Usually fried, with a coat of flour, and served with Balsamico, or Fegato Grasso al Balsamico.

        I had it once in Como sauteed, no flour, with slices of sauteed Pear, which was slightly better. There are so much better items from the Italian kitchen to enjoy.

        1. I just looked and the production has been banned in Italy but it can still be shipped in and served.

          1. There is foie gras in italy and a lot of it comes from hungary.

            5 Replies
            1. re: vinoroma

              And just as the French know very little about making good pasta and risotto and should leave it to the Italians, the Italians know very little about the quality and cooking of foie gras and should leave it to the French.

              1. re: allende

                That's odd. I'm neither French NOR Italian and I can cook up a mean fois gras :)

                1. re: c oliver

                  Hi Oliver -

                  " Fois Gras ? "

                  Is that similar to Foie Gras, or is that the spelling used in Budapest ?

                  1. re: SWISSAIRE

                    That is TOO hilarious, Swiss! I can spell that in my sleep since I DO dream about it. Typo.

                    The best meal of my life included foie and was in Budapest.

              2. re: vinoroma

                We were in Budapest a few months ago and ate fois almost every day. I found out that they are the second largest producer behind France.

              3. Massimo Trojani at Il Convivio, Rome, told me that foie gras has its origin not in France but in the Near East, and thus spread throughout the Mediterranean. Every time that I've had it in Italy, it has been outstanding.