HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

Do you eat rabbit? How do you cook it?

I live in Piemonte, Italy, and we have a long tradition in cooking rabbit, as rabbit at the time was wild or very easy/cheap to breed.
We have some very delicious recipes like "tuna" rabbit or rabbit in mustard, or rabbit with Taggiasca olives.
As it is an healthy meat, low in fat and high in protein and minerals I'm looking for some new inspiring recipes.
Thanks for any suggestion :-)
Elisa

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Think I've only eaten rabbit ONE time in my life... was very tasty. Former neighbors worked with a guy who raised chickens (for meat, but mostly eggs) & rabbits. Think she roasted it pretty much like a chicken?? Since very lean and no skin on it, ya might wanna think about something to cover with while roasting... like bacon??

    1 Reply
    1. re: kseiverd

      Roasted with bacon sounds gorgeous! This let me also think that could be even used some Italian bacon (lardo). Thanks. I'll try these next time!

    2. We love rabbit but don't have the opportunity to eat it very often. Last time I made something similar to this recipe. I can't find the one I actually used but this pretty close. It was VERY good
      http://www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/re...

      1 Reply
      1. re: foodieX2

        Thanks! It looks like an autumn-winter recipe. I'll store to use in 3-4 months! We in Italy use to side with lentils the zampone (stuffed pigs foot ) it is a very must-to-eat for the New Year's Eve, because lentils bring good luck for the new year. I think they bring luck even when siding rabbit loins ;-)

      2. A restaurant in Williamsburg, Va used to do rabbit braised in a dark liquid, probably beef or rabbit stock, and sauced with a red wine reduction. Quite tasty.

        1. I don't really cook rabbit but will usually order it if I see it on the menu. One of my favourite rabbit dishes I had was in Florence. The rabbit had been cut in two length ways, it was marinated in olive olive and oregano and grilled. best of all the half of rabbit still had the kidney attached.

          1. Fried rabbit in a milk gravy was one of my favorite dishes growing up - I should make it more often. And one of my favorite dishes in the city is the ma la rabbit with peanuts and scallions at Chengdu Heaven in Flushing.

            1. Love rabbit. Braised legs for Lapin Moutarde, terrine de Lapin, rabbit sausage, stuffed roulade of rabbit, chicken fried rabbit lags, etc etc.

               
               
               
               
              1. Ribbit & Dumplins', southern tradition. A great recipe is attached from Food Network, but I make my dumplins paper thin, use chicken stock and bacon/salt meat/ham mixture with butter for the roux. There are a million versions, but this is a great guide... http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ra...

                1. Rabbit & Dumplins', southern tradition. A great recipe is attached from Food Network, but I make my dumplins paper thin, use chicken stock and bacon/salt meat/ham mixture with butter for the roux. There are a million versions, but this is a great guide... http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ra...

                  1. Well seeing as you are in Italy I will give you a down home days hunt rabbit Texas Style.
                    Rabbit and Grits
                    1. 8 ounces bacon, chopped
                    2. 2 1 1/2- to 1 3/4-pound rabbits( cut into serving pieces)
                    3. 1 tablespoon butter
                    4. 1 large red onion, chopped
                    5. 2 carrots, peeled, chopped
                    6. 2 celery stalks, chopped
                    7. 6 garlic cloves, chopped
                    8. 6 large fresh thyme sprigs
                    9. 2 bay leaves
                    10. 2 cups dry red wine
                    11. 3 cups low-salt chicken broth
                    12. 2 cups crushed tomatoes
                    Preheat oven to 350°F. Saute bacon in wide ovenproof pot over medium heat until crisp. drian bacon on paper towels.
                    Sprinkle rabbit with salt and pepper. Turn heat to medium-high. add rabbit to pot and saute until browned, turning to cook even. Place in a large dish Add 1 tablespoon butter to pot add onion, carrots, and celery. Saute until vegetables begin to brown,. Add garlic, thyme, and bay leaves; stir 1 minute. Return rabbit and bacon to pot. Add wine; simmer 5 minutes. Stir in broth and tomatoes; bring to boil. Cover pot tightly. Transfer to oven and cook rabbit until very tender, about 1 hour 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Divide among plates
                    1. 4 cups water
                    2. 3 tablespoons butter
                    3. 3/4 teaspoon salt
                    4. 1 cup quick-cooking grits
                    5. 1 cup (packed) coarsely grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
                    6. 1/2 cup (packed) coarsely grated Monterey Jack cheese
                    7. 1/2 cup whole milk
                    8. 2 large eggs
                    Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter 8x8x2-inch glass baking dish. Bring 4 cups water, butter, and salt to boil in heavy medium saucepan. Gradually whisk in grits. Reduce heat to medium; cook until mixture thickens slightly, stirring often, about 8 minutes. Remove from heat. Add both cheeses; stir until melted. Season with pepper and more salt, if desired. Whisk milk and eggs in small bowl. Gradually whisk mixture into grits.
                    Pour cheese grits into prepared dish. Bake until grits feel firm to touch in center (gritswill still be soft), about 1 hour. Let stand 10 minutes and serve.

                    2 Replies
                    1. re: girloftheworld

                      Great! It's the first time ever I heard about cooking rabbit with grits! Think to try a Texas style recipe really intrigue me. Thanks I've wrote it down :-)

                      1. re: milkhoneyandrum

                        I've been using corn grits to make polenta for some time now … so I'd suggest that as you're in Italy you can just use coarse polenta.

                    2. Here's a thread from last year that has various ideas. Here in California it's quite expensive. I paid US$35 for one!

                      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/897031

                      17 Replies
                      1. re: c oliver

                        $35 for one rabbit? I had no idea they were so expensive in the US.I was complaining recently about having to pay £5 for a rabbit.Guess I should consider myself lucky.

                        1. re: Paprikaboy

                          Definitely! And that one I bought in Sonoma, CA, at a very high end market with a lot of specialty foods. I haven't seen one in a market since then. I asked at Whole Foods and they said they hadn't been able to find a supplier who meets their standards.

                          1. re: Paprikaboy

                            wow I get them from the guy across street.... I am so sad we are moving he is my game source... he hunts but no-one eats it it in his house sohe is always bringing me boar rabbit venison..

                            1. re: Paprikaboy

                              ----

                              $35 for one rabbit?

                              ------------

                              I paid $13 USD for a close to 3 lb rabbit I picked up a week or so ago in my freezer.

                              Farm raised.

                              As for wild hare, I can get it most of the fall and winter from hunting buddies and pay in exchange for wine or beer.

                              The sad part is, for the cost of hunting licenses, your hunting time , field dressing/skinning ang gutting time, and ammo these days, it's kind of a wash vs. farm raised bunnies at the butcher for cost.

                              Still gonna do lapin a'la moutarde with mine.
                              Side of homemade spatzle in very light basil pesto cream sauce and either sauted spinach or roasted asparagus as sides. Maybe some sauteeed mushrooms thown in there too.

                              If I;m going to fail cooking it , I"m going to go down big. Mega big.
                              Go big or go home. LOLZ.

                              1. re: Paprikaboy

                                You might go to the live poultry shops if you are in a metro area.

                                Look for them in Chinese and Latin American areas.

                              2. re: c oliver

                                It's weird to think how it is easy and cheap to breed rabbit and it is an expensive meat. Even in Italy it is quite expensive, but not that way. Average it costs the equivalent of 15-18$. Maybe in California it's organic or breed by little local farmers?

                                1. re: milkhoneyandrum

                                  I think there's little demand for it so, yes, just small farmers raising it for locals. I know almost no one who has ever eaten it.

                                2. re: c oliver

                                  I almost bought one for US$35 at Whole Foods just yesterday.

                                  1. re: fldhkybnva

                                    Go to a live poultry shop. There is one selling rabbits at 117 street between 2nd and 3rd, or 3rd and lex. There are many others near 1 train and 207, Astoria near 39 n train station, and all over the Bronx.

                                    I refuse to enter Whole Foods. It screams 'monolithic blind follow me buy from me.'

                                    It is similar closest present day thing to The Church in the Dark Ages of Europe.

                                    Jerome Ave has a live poultry, up on the Ave.

                                    1. re: jonkyo

                                      Unfortunately I don't live in NYC so those options are not available to me and I know of no live poultry shops where I live.

                                      1. re: fldhkybnva

                                        I hope you do find what will suit your cooking desires, where you live.

                                      2. re: jonkyo

                                        The closest Whole Foods to me has an incredible bulk foods, beer, cheese, wine, produce, and tea. I would go every single day if I could.

                                        1. re: jonkyo

                                          I've reached the point in life where I'll pay more for better quality.

                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            There are certainly things where that is true for me as well...beer, cheese, bread, meat...

                                            1. re: jpc8015

                                              And for me, especially chicken. I'm the last thing from a germophobe but the whole Foster Farms thing just pushed me over the line. Not to mention all the animal cruelty involved.

                                              1. re: c oliver

                                                I have Foster Farms chicken in my refrigerator right now.

                                        2. re: fldhkybnva

                                          As you know, WF has "animal welfare standards," which of course add mightily to the cost. In case others don't know here's their site:

                                          http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/about...

                                      3. Rabbit is not very difficult to find in places in China. The markets in many places have live rabbits, for instance, in Guangzhou, under the same market roof as scorpions.

                                        Generally speaking there is not much meat as one gets with mammalians. Rodents as a rule are most all like this, unless you get a really fat rat, another item found in China but not here.

                                        Go to a website with Chinese recipes. In the metro nyc area, rabbit is easily found, but only at ethnic exclusive cuisine venues (Eastern Europe; Central Asian; Chinese; etc).

                                        Search google with "兔子肉的做法" and use 'translate this page', if you are not adept at Chinese language.

                                        That is 'how to cook rabbit meat'.

                                        A list of rabbit recipes (
                                        cookbook:食谱 shipu) here:
                                        Just copy and paste and use google translate. Or get with a Chinese friend:

                                        http://www.xinshipu.com/doSearch.html...

                                        27 Replies
                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            According to Oxford Dictionary, rabbits were considered rodentia members until sometime in the 20th century. By then zoologists managed to circumvent this label and rabbits along with hares became members of a Leporidae.

                                            Thank you for this zoological fact.

                                            They still have limited meat considering comparative measurements with mammalians.

                                            1. re: jonkyo

                                              Rabbits ARE mammals. Guess the Easter eggs confused you. ;-)

                                              1. re: greygarious

                                                "".... still have limited meat considering comparative measurements WITH OTHER mammalians.""

                                          2. re: jonkyo

                                            Lagomorph - look it up.

                                            To the OP - nope. Won't eat Bambi, won't eat Thumper either.

                                            1. re: greygarious

                                              I believe rabbits are a Leporidae which kind of like calling a mushroom a yeast or a chimpanzee an ape... close enough to be in the same section of the grocery store but not the same thing..... Buttttttt I havent "looked it up" just going on what my eighth grade education rememebers

                                              1. re: girloftheworld

                                                Had you looked it up before opining, you'd have seen that the order is Lagomorpha, the family leporidae.

                                                1. re: greygarious

                                                  my point is they are not the same thing... and are very distinct from "rodents" in many respects ...hence the distinction zoologically into a different classification.

                                              2. re: greygarious

                                                In south east asia and east asia I hate a donkey, thumper, and rover.

                                                Of course it is cultural, and this makes travel interesting.

                                                1. re: jonkyo

                                                  I hate no donkey, rabbit, or dog, no matter where they live. Humans, on the other hand....

                                                  1. re: greygarious

                                                    I have never eaten a donkey... but I have had my ass chewed..

                                                    1. re: girloftheworld

                                                      LOL.

                                                      Have eaten ass ragu in northern Italy. Was fine - a bit greasy, perhaps. Several horse dishes on the menu,as well, but we only went to that restaurant the once. When I wrote up the review on TripAdvisor, "ass" fell foul of its profanity filter, so I had to write donkey. I wonder if it would filter out "arse"?

                                                      1. re: Harters

                                                        How was horse? It always cracks me up when kids say the school is serving horse..I am like Do you know how expensive that would be?

                                                        1. re: girloftheworld

                                                          ...but the Queen don't ride a chicken...

                                                    2. re: greygarious

                                                      I don't hate them either, but a rabbit the size of a donkey would be seriously tempting about right now !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                                                2. re: jonkyo

                                                  "Generally speaking there is not much meat as one gets with mammalians. Rodents as a rule are most all like this,"
                                                  Not to pile on you, but aside from the lagomorph thing which others have pointed out ( and I have to add as a rodent lover that the taxonomic debate about lagomorphs vs rodents has been going on for a while - meaning, subject to change), of course both lagomorphs and rodents are mammmals. Maybe you need to stop and proofread a little before you post, since I'm pretty sure that was just a typo or something on your part.

                                                  Having said that your main point, that rabbit is cheaply available in Asian markets, is correct. The odd thing is that most of the rabbit available in NYC supermarkets, whether ethnic ones or C-Town/Key Food etc., is imported from China, which I have always found bizarre. Most of the duck, to give an example of a meat that is a little less used in the USA, you find in Asian markets here is raised in the US, since there is such a large Chinese-American market for it. So why aren't there more American farms raising rabbit for this market?

                                                  1. re: ratgirlagogo

                                                    --------------

                                                    So why aren't there more American farms raising rabbit for this market?

                                                    ------------

                                                    Without Googleing and off the top of my head, I;d say lack of demand in the USA if not North America, and the lack of people that either grew up eating it or are familiar with preparing it.

                                                    To many it is/was a beloved pet or a novel or moive based reference that could never be conceived as a food source.

                                                    Too soft. Too cuddly. Too , un, well, "sweet." (But still yummy.)

                                                    Unless your are a hunter or lived 75 years ago or more which see,s to be when rabbit was a well accepted food source.

                                                    I do find those that find rabbit as a food souce troubling very interesting. And troubling. LOL.

                                                    It's a culture thang. That's the best I can assertain today. :-)

                                                    1. re: jjjrfoodie

                                                      Once an American lady said me that rabbit is underappreciated.

                                                      I can understand your point, if my anchestors haven'd ate rabbit probably they haven't had other proteins to eat. And here the winter freeze.

                                                      Maybe the fact is also a question of habits? Or it is that it's much more easy to choose chicken like white meat, as it is cheaper and common?

                                                      In Italy we can buy rabbit almost everywhere, we have organics and not, we can buy in supermarkets, famer markets. I think it is a little bit widespread to eat it, but chicken it's much more.

                                                      1. re: jjjrfoodie

                                                        Yup. I did not grow up in a rural area. NOBODY hunted and if any household in the neighborhood owned a gun of any sort, the neighbors did not know about it.

                                                        We eagerly awaited each and every Disney movie. My mother would take me, and more often than not, we left partway through because 5 or 6yr old me would burst into tears whenever an animal died or was endangered. One of my earliest pets was a rabbit. I would not want to eat a species that is a common pet.
                                                        It's a cultural thing, to be sure, but there it is.
                                                        If I'd been a child when "Babe" was filmed, I'd probably never have eaten pork. As it was, I avoided it for many months thereafter, except for bacon. I freely acknowledge the hypocrisy.

                                                        Anyone remember the TV show "Baretta"? In one episode, Robert Blake has to disappoint the old codger who's his buddy and was looking forward to a fishing trip. So he buys a couple of catfish and puts them in the bathtub, intending that his friend hook them and prepare them for dinner. At the end of the show, both contemplate the tub, and Baretta, with bemused yet rueful resignation, says something like, "Let's go - I'll buy you a steak. We'll name them when we get back!"

                                                        1. re: jjjrfoodie

                                                          But none of this applies to the Chinese American market. That's what I don't understand. Most duck farms sell pretty exclusively to this market and I'm sure rabbit farms could as well. They wouldn't need to worry about mainstream American tastes.

                                                          1. re: ratgirlagogo

                                                            -----

                                                            But none of this applies to the Chinese American market.

                                                            ------

                                                            But it does in a way.

                                                            Without know the price per pound the mkt is charging, or even kowning at what price they are sourcing them for, I both can and cannot answer your question.

                                                            But really, like any good attorney, I can answer your qeustion based upon your comment.

                                                            Asian rabbit is cheap to source and cheap to access.
                                                            Done.
                                                            Little if any import restrictions and little competion on the market.
                                                            Local sourced bunnies, while better and local will likely be of higher cost.

                                                            Done.

                                                            No one can supply it for fair market value to the buyers cheaper than the import product in that market. or at lest the suppliers are content with what they supply, wha they make and buyers keep coming back.

                                                            Econ 101 in microcosim.

                                                            If the buyers don;t care where they buy, then the user is culpable or shoud do due dilligence. When neither party cares and it is just a matter of price of goods, then the arguement goes unheeded unless one or both parties can get a local product at a better price.

                                                            Done.

                                                            On CH- Quite simple. In reality? Not so much.

                                                            :-)

                                                            1. re: jjjrfoodie

                                                              I get all that - what I don't get is why it's cheaper to import rabbits than it is to import duck. It seems like it would just as easy to raise rabbit locally for the Chinese American market as it is to raise duck locally for that market.

                                                        2. re: ratgirlagogo

                                                          Yes, this is true. Mammalian glands are included in rodents.

                                                          This is my mistake, due to my being divorced from biology discussions and what not.

                                                          My taxonomic lapse does not help me when I am in a C-Town.

                                                          Rodents have less meat than bovine, but perhaps the same as marsupials. Odd-toed ungulates such as Donkey and horse are meaty.

                                                          I was never thrilled with rodential meat, or leporidae meat.

                                                          Duck and donkey are dark meat and nice.

                                                          Do you find the recipes in Chinese able to be translatable on google. If I had time I would translate a few.

                                                          1. re: jonkyo

                                                            Rabbits aren't rodents and this thread is about rabbits.

                                                            1. re: c oliver

                                                              They are close to rodents, more so than the pig I ate last.

                                                              Maybe if the rabbit meat is ground, it could be more appetizing for people.

                                                              This is a rabbit burger.

                                                               
                                                              1. re: jonkyo

                                                                How about a non-patty minced rabbit dish?

                                                        3. re: jonkyo

                                                          Enter this in Google:

                                                          我爱美国啤酒

                                                        4. Rabbit's regularly on sale at the farmers market. And it's always very cheap. Unfortunately, I find it a difficult meat to deal with - so easy to overcook and it becomes dry and, of course, it's a pretty bland taste.

                                                          I like it in a pie either with other game or on its own as in the recipe at the bottom of this link - http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandsty...

                                                          I also like it as a burger (although it needs so fatty pork mixing in as the bunny is so lean.

                                                          You already seem to have my preferred way - rabbit in mustard. Does the Italian version differ much from the French "lapin a la moutarde"?

                                                          7 Replies
                                                          1. re: Harters

                                                            Harter,
                                                            I think that rabbit in mustard from Piemonte has some differences: we use mustard powder not the grainy mustard of Dijion, we use white wine and milk, not cream, so I think that it is lighter and the flavor is more "sweet" and delicate. But still have a taste not to blande. You can check the Piemonte recipe here: http://milkhoneyandrum.com/rabbit-in-...
                                                            What do you think? is different from the one that you use?

                                                            I think you could like this recipe that comes from Piemonte that is very easy and is made to avoid the dry and to preserve the rabbit prepared even 5-6 days in fridge.
                                                            http://milkhoneyandrum.com/tuna-rabbi...

                                                            1. re: milkhoneyandrum

                                                              Seems similar to the classic French version but sufficiently different that I'm going to try it. Unlike most game, there's no hunting season on rabbit (as it's regarded as a pest) so locally shot ones are pretty much always available at the market.

                                                              1. re: Harters

                                                                Yes, the same here. Always available in the refrigerator aisle.

                                                                1. re: Harters

                                                                  You get wild rabbit locally? Very cool -- how do they differ from farmed ones?

                                                                  1. re: rjbh20

                                                                    "You get wild rabbit locally? Very cool -- how do they differ from farmed ones?"

                                                                    The wild carry spares while the domesticated farmed ones, carry smart phones. One is familiar with scripture the other, wild rabbit practices shamanism.

                                                                    jest only.

                                                                    1. re: rjbh20

                                                                      It's so long since I've bought farmed bunny that I don't think I can make a decent comparison.

                                                                      But, if I was to, then I'd make the guess that it'd be the usual comparision between wild and farmed meat - with the former having more flavour due to it running around more and exercising its muscles.

                                                                      1. re: Harters

                                                                        I haven't had farmed for over 20 years. They used to do frozen rabbit pieces in Sainsbury's. I used them a lot when I was a hard up student as they were far cheaper than chicken, Used them for curries , though took some convincing for my housemates to eat it, none of then had tried rabbit before.

                                                                1. I think every time I've cooked rabbit (3 or 4, tops), it's been alla cacciatora. Of course, Elmer Fudd would recommend fwicasee.

                                                                  1. I do and many different ways here are a couple:
                                                                    A couple of cold Prearations for Summer:
                                                                    Conejo en Escabeche Both the Spanish style and Mexican.
                                                                    Szechuan Cold Rabbit and Peanuts in Hot Oil

                                                                    Hot Dishes:
                                                                    Hasenpfeffer
                                                                    Lapin A La Bourguignonne
                                                                    Stewed in Beer with Szechuan Pepper and Bamboo
                                                                    Greek Rabbit in a Wine and Garlic Sauce

                                                                    2 Replies
                                                                    1. re: chefj

                                                                      On a whim with some leftover rabbit, I used a coq au vin recipe and subbed bunny for chicken. I found that treatment served it very well. We dubbed it "Lapin au vin", and I imagine it might be similar to chefj's Lapin A La Bourguignonne.

                                                                      1. re: GourmetWednesday

                                                                        Please the dish is not mine. It belongs to the People of Burgundy!
                                                                        You will find even nicer if the Dish is made start to finish with Rabbit(even better with Wild Rabbit)

                                                                    2. We bought fresh rabbit last week ... it was just shy of twenty bucks for one.
                                                                      That rabbit was prepared cacciatore, but the best I've ever had was prepared with white wine, frozen peas, and dried rosemary. Molto delizioso.

                                                                      1 Reply
                                                                      1. re: Cheese Boy

                                                                        Cacciatora is a very Italian style prep! Delizioso, yes! Normally I use taggiasca olives http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cailletier.
                                                                        I see that it is widespread the use to simmer rabbit with white wine. Love it!

                                                                      2. this is a depiction of a native (origin unknown) cooking rabbit.

                                                                        The second photo may be helpful too. That is a modern man working on the theme of rabbit, in a kitchen no less.

                                                                        According to the number 3 photo, use a deep iron oblong thing, and make a stew, in the oven. That recipe is found by following this url:
                                                                        http://inafoodblog.wordpress.com/meat...

                                                                        Good luck, Let us know what recipe or preparation you use.

                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                        4 Replies
                                                                        1. re: jonkyo

                                                                          Great the first! Thus natives cooking rabbits. I didn't know!
                                                                          I think too that one of the best way to cook rabbit is stew.
                                                                          For my recipes if you like you can cast a glance at my food blog. Till now they are all very Piemonte style. But I'm going to try at least the recipes suggested here, that looks delicious!
                                                                          Thanks!

                                                                          1. re: milkhoneyandrum

                                                                            On the theme of stew, turn it into a pie (a traditional British way with rabbit) - this recipe is good and easily adaptable if you can't find all the ingredients in Italy.
                                                                            http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/ty...

                                                                            1. re: Harters

                                                                              Yummy! The only ingredient I'm not sure to find in Turin is the dry cider. We have cider but I'm not sure we have a wide variety or distinction. I'll check.
                                                                              What do you think of a shepherd's pie with rabbit?

                                                                              1. re: milkhoneyandrum

                                                                                So long as the cider isn't very, very sweet, it should be OK. But if you don't feel you have the right thing, use a dry white wine instead - it'll be fine.

                                                                                Personally, I don't think a shepherd's pie is going to work that well. Unless you really build up the flavour of the rabbit mince, I think it's going to be too bland with just the mashed potato on top. You could try and build the flavour in the potato - for shepherd's pie, we sometimes mix the potato with cooked onions and then finish off with grated cheese on top before cooking. Might work with the rabbit?

                                                                        2. I love rabbit, but it's been years since I cooked one. I've cooked several, but I have to say I never quite mastered the jointing of the rabbit.

                                                                          My favorite part of the rabbit, bar none, is the liver. Rabbit liver is the finest of all livers saving foie gras. Rabbit liver is so fine, mild and surprisingly large.

                                                                          1. I make a good terrine with it. I use Thomas Keller's recipe in his Buchon cook book.

                                                                            1 Reply
                                                                            1. re: Candy

                                                                              ohhh yummmmy.. there is a place here that serves delicious terrine...you must be very patient...

                                                                            2. In a jambalaya is good, too. I live in Montana and I can't find anywhere that sells dressed rabbit, and I'm too old to hunt anymore! Fricassee was My grandma's specialty.

                                                                              1. I like to get two and and take them apart. I sauté the boned loins, braise the legs with a bit of stock, and make a batch of rabbit sausage which I adore. The texture and flavor is enhanced.

                                                                                1. You probably have a favorite pasta sauce recipe, but here's ours:

                                                                                  Ragù di coniglio, from “Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way”
                                                                                  For the condimento:
                                                                                  1 rabbit weighing about 4½ pounds (2 kilograms), cut into several pieces (frozen and thawed is fine)
                                                                                  2 ounces (60 grams) pancetta
                                                                                  1 white onion
                                                                                  1 carrot
                                                                                  1 rib celery
                                                                                  1 sprig fresh rosemary
                                                                                  2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, preferably lightly fruity
                                                                                  3 tablespoons (40 grams) unsalted butter
                                                                                  1 level teaspoon fennel seeds
                                                                                  ⅓ cup (90 milliliters) dry white wine
                                                                                  2 cups (600 grams) tomato puree
                                                                                  1 teaspoon salt
                                                                                  freshly ground black pepper
                                                                                  To make the dish:
                                                                                  1 pound (450 grams) pasta (tagliatelle are particularly good)
                                                                                  1 cup (150 grams) grated parmigiano-reggiano

                                                                                  Put the rabbit pieces in a deep 14-inch (35-centimeter) skillet without any fat. Heat over low heat until the meat throws off its water, about 5 or 6 minutes. Remove the meat and discard the liquid. Meanwhile, chop finely together the pancetta, onion, carrot, celery, and rosemary (in the food processor if desired). When you have removed the rabbit pieces, put the oil and the butter in the same pan and add the pancetta mixture. sauté over low heat for about 10 minutes, or until the fat melts and the vegetables are soft.

                                                                                  Return the rabbit to the pan and add the fennel seeds. Brown the meat, turning often and scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the wine, turn up the heat, and let it bubble until the alcohol smell disappears, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato puree, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and simmer, covered, over medium heat for about 40 minutes, or until the rabbit is tender.

                                                                                  Remove the meat from the pan, then bone and chop it coarsely. Return it to the sauce. Let the flavors blend a few more minutes over low heat.

                                                                                  Make-ahead note: The process can be interrupted at this point and the sauce kept in the refrigerator for a couple of days or frozen. In any case, like other meat sauces, it will be tastier the second day than when freshly made.

                                                                                  Dbrain the pasta and transfer it to the warmed serving bowl. Toss first with the cheese and then with the sauce. Serve immediately.

                                                                                  1. You probably have a favorite pasta sauce recipe, but here's ours:

                                                                                    Ragù di coniglio, from “Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way”
                                                                                    For the condimento:
                                                                                    1 rabbit weighing about 4½ pounds (2 kilograms), cut into several pieces (frozen and thawed is fine)
                                                                                    2 ounces (60 grams) pancetta
                                                                                    1 white onion
                                                                                    1 carrot
                                                                                    1 rib celery
                                                                                    1 sprig fresh rosemary
                                                                                    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, preferably lightly fruity
                                                                                    3 tablespoons (40 grams) unsalted butter
                                                                                    1 level teaspoon fennel seeds
                                                                                    ⅓ cup (90 milliliters) dry white wine
                                                                                    2 cups (600 grams) tomato puree
                                                                                    1 teaspoon salt
                                                                                    freshly ground black pepper
                                                                                    To make the dish:
                                                                                    1 pound (450 grams) pasta (tagliatelle are particularly good)
                                                                                    1 cup (150 grams) grated parmigiano-reggiano

                                                                                    Put the rabbit pieces in a deep 14-inch (35-centimeter) skillet without any fat. Heat over low heat until the meat throws off its water, about 5 or 6 minutes. Remove the meat and discard the liquid. Meanwhile, chop finely together the pancetta, onion, carrot, celery, and rosemary (in the food processor if desired). When you have removed the rabbit pieces, put the oil and the butter in the same pan and add the pancetta mixture. sauté over low heat for about 10 minutes, or until the fat melts and the vegetables are soft.

                                                                                    Return the rabbit to the pan and add the fennel seeds. Brown the meat, turning often and scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the wine, turn up the heat, and let it bubble until the alcohol smell disappears, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato puree, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and simmer, covered, over medium heat for about 40 minutes, or until the rabbit is tender.

                                                                                    Remove the meat from the pan, then bone and chop it coarsely. Return it to the sauce. Let the flavors blend a few more minutes over low heat.

                                                                                    Make-ahead note: The process can be interrupted at this point and the sauce kept in the refrigerator for a couple of days or frozen. In any case, like other meat sauces, it will be tastier the second day than when freshly made.

                                                                                    Drain the pasta and transfer it to a warmed serving bowl. Toss first with the cheese and then with the sauce. Serve immediately.

                                                                                    1. Love rabbit and prepare it often. Usually braises, but sometimes roasted stuffed with Armagnac soaked prunes and wrapped with bacon.