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Steakhouse at hotel or near [San Francisco]

Visiting in two weeks and looking for great located hotel with excellent restaurant either in hotel or close walk. Steak preferred but not required.
Money not an issue. Thanks.

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  1. Stay at the Westin St Francis, home to Bourbon Steak. The Clock Bar is good too. There are many good restaurants in proximity to Union Sq.

    1. Alfred's is across the street from the Hilton Financial District at 750 Kearny (not to be confused with the Hilton Union Square on O'Farrell).

      9 Replies
      1. re: Robert Lauriston

        Had excellent crab cakes and a tasty bone-in NY steak at Alfred's last time there, an old school type of place.

        1. re: curiousgeo

          Old-school, local, great corn-finished prime beef dry-aged in house and grilled over charcoal, and lower prices than the competition.

          1. re: Robert Lauriston

            I love Alfred's... but Harris' Steakhouse on Van Ness corner Pacific is my favorite in the city!

            1. re: OliverB

              I thought Alfred's was better in just about every way.

              http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8117...

              I liked Harris' enough to go back but I'd order something else.

              http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8117...

              1. re: Robert Lauriston

                Alfred's is one of my favorite restaurants in the city and one of the first that I visited with a close friend when I moved to San Francisco 3 years ago so it will always hold a special place in my heart. I usually pop-in at least once a month for happy hour cocktails in the bar, and every other month (okay maybe every three!) for a proper sit-down dinner.

                That said, the quality and cuts of dry aged meat are not comparable to Harris' Steakhouse from my experience. They carry on Grison's Chop House tradition of only serving corn-fed Midwest beef and it's probably the closest you'll get to a classic KC steak in Northern CA. My friends did a ribeye cookoff last year and Harris' dry-aged came in second after Five Dot Farms grass-fed non-aged; the others were from Belcampo, MacGruder Farms, Baron's in Alameda, and Marin Sun Farms. Anyway, for my money Harris the best in the city... though admittedly I've never been to any of the chains or modern steakhouses because I have little interest.

                You should give it another chance. I was just there two months ago with my dining group and had an exceptional meal. I ordered the New York Cut this past time. One friend ordered the lamb chops and they too were wonderful. Great chop salad and perfect cocktails too. They were even giving away free hardcover books at the door, though I didn't take one as my shelves are already overflowing

                Check out the old wooden Grison's menu:
                http://postcardy.blogspot.com/2010/06...

                1. re: OliverB

                  >>My friends did a ribeye cookoff last year and Harris' dry-aged came in second after Five Dot Farms grass-fed non-aged; the others were from Belcampo, MacGruder Farms, Baron's in Alameda, and Marin Sun Farms.>>

                  That's really interesting; we've tried Baron's & Marin Farms but not Belcampo, Harris or MacGruder. However, we had both the non-aged and aged Five Dot Farms rib-eye last year on a one-to-one comparison. Altho good for CA beef they were not in the top-level Midwest/East Coast steakhouse tier.

                  1. re: OliverB

                    I thought Alfred's beef had more flavor. Both buy corn-fed Midwestern beef and dry-age it in house.

          2. re: Robert Lauriston

            You really like Alfreds, RL. I had a very substandard steak there back in 2002 and never returned. I usually go to Izzy's, Harris, or Alexander's. I'll have to try again.

            1. re: sfchris

              I think a very negative review from Michael Bauer in 2004 was a wake-up call and they got their act back together.

          3. You should be aware that the general consensus is the steakhouses in San Francisco are not as good as what you might find in the mid-west and in New York City.

            If you want to stay in the Omni Hotel in the Financial District (California & Montgomery Streets), there is a Bob's Steak & Chop House (a Texas-based chain) on the ground floor. A couple blocks away on California Street is the famous Tadich Grill (very good seafood and they serve a good steak too) and Perbacco (excellent Italian).

            7 Replies
            1. re: DavidT

              I ate at Bob's years ago when it first opened, and it was killer good. But the prices were heart-stopping, even though my friend was picking up the check on expense account (gee, remember those? LOL!). Never forgotten it, though.

              1. re: DavidT

                Bob's does not dry-age its meat. I guess you can get away with that in Texas.

                Steak is not one of the safe things to order at Tadich.

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/850791

                1. re: DavidT

                  You should be aware that the general consensus is the steakhouses in San Francisco are not as good as what you might find in the mid-west and in New York City.
                  _________

                  What "general consensus" are you referring to?

                  1. re: DavidT

                    I used to work at 555 Montgomery, around the corner from Bob's. I tried it twice and I was pretty appalled by the food.

                    I think Alexander's is one of the best restaurants in the world - but it is anything but a traditional steakhouse. I can't imagine anyone being disappointed by dining at Alexander's, but if you want a traditional steakhouse, in SF I would choose Harris, on the Peninsula Izzy's, in the East Bay Vic Stewart's, and in the South Bay Forbes Mill.

                    1. re: RKaplan

                      Huh, I stay at the Omni for work and just ate at Bob's. Had the ribeye and the Kansas City Strip and they were both really good, excellent even. I only have California to compare it to, but it was definitely better than the steak at Ruths Chris.

                      The cinnamon carrot may not be to everyone's liking, but they'll swap it out if you want. I liked it though.

                      I liked the lobster tail with béarnaise sauce too.

                      The prices are high, but so is the price of everything else in this city.

                      1. re: choctastic

                        "Better than Ruth's Chris" is not very high praise. Neither of those chains dry-age their beef. Last time I looked at Bob's menu prices were higher than at Alfred's, which is three blocks away.

                        1. re: Robert Lauriston

                          And if had worked late and wanted a steak right after work without needing to cross town for it, I would happily go to Alfred's. One of the best Oysters Rockefeller in town, the bone-in ribeye with chimichurri sauce, and, always, the ravioli side order. For a change, the bistecca alla fiorentina. One time, the meat a little less than excellent. Every other time, wonderful.

                          But there's just something about Harris'. Maybe they use those super-high heat grills to get a better sear on the meat, I don't know. It's just better. I still say that the first tomahawk chop I had at Alexander's is the best steak and quite possibly the best meal I ever ate in my life, but as stated by many, Alexander's is not a traditional steakhouse. If someone asked me about a steakhouse in SF, I'd MENTION Alexander's as a possible ALTERNATIVE, and it would probably be the first restaurant on the list if someone just asked me for a recommendation for a great, memorable meal in the Bay Area, price no object. But for a pure, traditional steakhouse, I still say Harris' is the best that the Bay Area has to offer.

                          I have never eaten at the many new high-end steakhouses that have sprung up in NY and Las Vegas and LA, so I'm sure there may be better new places out there. If you had asked me a few years back what the best I ever had anywhere was, I would have said Ben Benson's in NY, but it's gone now. I guess that would leave Gene and Georgetti's back in the old hometown Chicago, Pappas Brothers in Dallas, and Vlado's in Richmond, a suburb of Melbourne (Victoria, not Florida).

                  2. Alexander's, stay at the Four Seasons.

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: ipsedixit

                      Alexander's has great "Money not an issue" steaks, but it's not that close to the Four Seasons (just under a mile). The Four Seasons is a very nice "Money not an issue" hotel, much nicer than, say, the Chinatown Hilton, which is just a rebranded Holiday Inn. If you are going to stay at the Four Seasons, you might want to try the hotel restaurant. It's changed around a bit over the years and I haven't tried the latest version, but supposedly, it has a steak theme.

                      1. re: nocharge

                        When did "just under a mile" become distant.

                    2. Whatever you do, stay away from Morton's. I had a business dinner there in May and it may be the worst meal I've been subjected to in the last decade.

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: Melanie Wong

                        Totally agree - but at least Morton's caused the funniest MB review I have ever read:

                        http://www.sfgate.com/restaurants/art...

                        1. re: sfchris

                          Yes, I remembered discussion of that review on this board. I intentionally did not look at it before attending this biz dinner so my opinions would not be influenced. No chance of that as every dish from appetizer, salad, sides, steak, and dessert was awful. Even the rolls were stale! The one saving grace was the baked potato --- and I've never seen a larger one. Must've been two pounds, yet the accompaniments of butter, chives, sour cream and bacon were so skimpy they didn't make it around the table. But at least this was edible. Yet there were two people at my table who raved about the meal. I guess that's what keeps Morton's in business. It's such a shame and waste of money, this much have been quite expensive with the private room and all.

                          1. re: Melanie Wong

                            We should create a thread on awful restaurants that stay in business because of expense accounts and proximity to business hotels. Morton's would be the king. It's impressive that they stay in business soley on national name recognition.