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lard, tallow, good extensive butchers in Madison, Wisconsin?

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http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/981092

^ I posted the thread above after I found some nontraditional meats like ostrich, emu, duck eggs, and lamb heart at the Farmer's Market at the Capital Square here in Madison. But I would like to continue to try all the exotic nontraditional foods that I can find before I leave when summer is over.

Can you please tell me where are the best butchers and meat shops here? Here are just some of the things that I would like to buy:

lard, tallow, duck fat, geese, raw milk, raw milk cheese and butter, suet, bone marrow, and many other things as well.

Where do you recommend? I am staying right by East Campus Mall at the University Square if that helps any.

From my research, I have found these two places:
http://undergroundbutcher.com/ <- hopefully for exotic meats but on the phone they said their online is menu is outdated so they don't carry a lot of things the advertisement says they. (ie no duck, etc.)
Whole Foods Madison for duck fat
Cops for lard
Farmer's Market for raw milk and butter
UWP meats, Woodmans, Dicks,
Conscious Carnivore (black earth meats) for bone marrow and suet

Thank you

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  1. Your options are pretty limited for this stuff, as far as I'm aware, but Underground Butcher is a great place to start -- as is the Dane County Farmers Market and the market out by Hilldale on Saturdays. I would go into Underground and see if they can work with you on what you want to try.

    Perhaps give some of the ethnic markets a shot for some unusual meats, like Midway Asian Market on Park Street.

    Also you could go right to the source by calling Jordandal (http://jordandalfarms.com/) or one of these farms (http://www.csacoalition.org/category/...) and seeing what they have to try.

    You can find Willow Creek Farms lard at the Willy Street Co-op, I think leaf lard included.

    1 Reply
    1. re: SLOLindsay

      I like the suggestion of Jordandals. That is my source for pork belly when making bacon.

      I would float Knoche's out there as an option. I have only ever sourced pork shoulder roasts from them, but have found them knowledgeable. I have heard good things about what they can source, also.

      Knoche's Meat - (608) 233-1410

    2. I second Underground Butcher. I've bought suet there before, and my understanding is they that they start with whole animals so they can probably get you any pig or cow part if given enough notice.

      1. I got a tub of duck fat through neesvig's.
        You might want to call them on other items.

        1. Update:

          This weekend I was able to most of what I was looking for. I found and bought the duck fat, lard, tallow / suet ?, bone marrow and potentially some exotic meats.

          I put a question mark next to suet because when I asked for suet the butcher asked me if I wanted 'raw suet' or 'rendered suet'. I thought there was only 'suet'. He said people usually only cook with 'rendered suet'. So, I said I'll take it.

          When I got home I found out that 'rendered suet' is called 'tallow'. Lol. So, I that is what I have. I am not sure how to use all these different types of oils that I now have.

          I now have: vegetable oil, peanut oil, olive oil, tallow, lard, and duck fat.

          I am going to do some research to see if there are particular foods that each oil is very well suited to. If the oils are not divided up like that and the only difference is fat content then I will probably throw away all of the vegetable oil and peanut oil and solely use the olive, tallow, and lard.

          The bacon at The Underground isn't bad but has nitrites. Boy, I wish WF made in-house smoked bacon with no nitrites. I will try to check Conscious Carnivore this weekend for no nitrite in-house bacon and other treats.

          1 Reply
          1. re: bloodboy

            Not adding "pink salt" nitrates means using LOTS more "natural" (celery-based, usually) and generally inferior nitrates, leading to a less healthy, less "natural" product. Don't believe the hype.

            http://ruhlman.com/2011/05/the-no-nit...