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Article FT Weekend: Ireland's Budding Craft cottage industry

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An interesting article shows the vicissitude of the roots of the craft beer markets, in differing locations.

"Artisan start-ups are flourishing in Ireland. Natalie Whittle meets a craft beer business brewing up a storm"

Title is in the print edition is 'Stout Hearted', on bottom page 7 Arts section, June 28/29 2014, Financial Times, just below the recipe for Strawberry pie.

It is said to be a .."craft-beer renaissance that embraces traditional methods".

Dungarvan Brewing is just one, the focus of this article.

This seems to have been related to the recession as we know, that Ireland was rising fast, then its economy nose-dived. As a result of the recession "a lot of people became unemployed....shorter work hours....had to supplement their income..."

And that seems to be when the Irish reached into their ancestral heritage, with 'start-up' food and beer companies.

Unlike my observations about the craft market's rise here in the States, which is based on making up for a tradition that never existed, that of making good beer, in Ireland, the catalyst is reaching into their long history, on a smaller scale.

"The recession has seen food and drink start-ups flourish all over Ireland, where a family beer business is brewing up a storm"-FT (Artisan food: Irish start-ups
By Natalie Whittle)

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/f6085b80-fc...

I would love to sample some of the home roasted barley beer from Dungarvan Brewing.......sounds yummy.

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  1. "Unlike my observations about the craft market's rise here in the States, which is based on making up for a tradition that never existed, that of making good beer, in Ireland, the catalyst is reaching into their long history, on a smaller scale."

    http://www.beerhistory.com/library/ho...

    3 Replies
    1. re: MVNYC

      "where to get food, how to secure shelter, and when would they get their next beer."

      Seeing that the natives they were to later supplant, did not have pubs and beer venues, the colonialist took to making their own beer.

      Eventually the colonialists secedes from the British, and the puritan got their way, and America eventually banned beer, disrupting it's flow with history of brewing, and when Prohibition ended, the industry and craft of making beer had been crimped by this.

      The UK's continuous history of making beer, and its high quality, in comparison to the beers of America, eventually caused many in Americans (in the late 80s to present) to attempt to make or craft their own beers in small breweries.

      To make up for the lack of a historic continuous quality thread, that the UK has with the past brewing for hundreds of years, the Americans use excessive amounts of hops.

      This is a substitute for the real thing, good taste. It is similar to the American Corvette, as opposed to the many UK speedster.

      Thus stated, many Americans are convinced their excessive hop beer is the best on the planet.....

      1. re: jonkyo

        Actually Ireland has had an equally long period of beer brewing stagnation. Guiness bought up all of the independent breweries save for Murphy's in the 1940's. Ireland has only experienced small independent brewers in the past decade or so. These Irish brewers are tapping into some mythic cultural knowledge. Anybody can learn to make good beer if they want. They don't have to brew the same exact way as their ancestors.

        If they did that, there would be no lager.

        1. re: MVNYC

          Depending how far back one goes, that is true. No lager.

          I think roasting barley would be quite a nice touch to brewing.

          Yes, buyouts of small businesses by large ones, such as the trend that has seen the minus-ing of small single owned broadcasters and newspapers, due to the buying by a few very large corp.

          That is capitalize, and for information and beer, is a Potemkin village, empty. Just the name brand.

          Where does Beamish figure with these buyouts? Murphy's and Guiness that is.

          It all began with Jesus and the Roman expansion. That shares with Madison Ave, much. The singular semiotic, known and worshipped...or drank...by all.

          So, with the UK and Americans setting the trend so to speak, regions are gaining back what they had before.

          As for lager, for me anyway, it was rare that I drank a lager while residing or visiting the UK.