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Jun 5, 2014 10:01 AM
Discussion

Matching jamón ibérico de bellota and wine

Probably best (or most poetic?) wine pairing notes ever.
Sorry, only Spanish, Català and French, at least for now.
Maybe by request they'll add the English translation?
http://www.ciurana.es/es/utilidad/20/...

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  1. Pretty damn gorgeous writing...and I was a strictly-Tio-Pepe person. Informative, too. Nice link. Thanks, Charles.

    1. It's definitely flowery language. Neat to read though - and I'm always looking for more things to get me to shove that acorn pig into my face.

      1. Rioja would be the classic choice, but I recently had a 2005 Vallana Gattinara with some Jamon Iberico de Bellota D.O. Guijuelo Marcos Salamanca and that was a great combination.

        2 Replies
        1. re: Robert Lauriston

          Two cheers for a good Gattinara as one great choice among aged reds, but I'm leaning, as the article suggests, in the end, to a classic fino and/or manzanilla pairing.

          1. re: bob96

            Each to his own, but to my taste a mature red is a better match than sherry. It doesn't get much better than Rioja and Iberico.

        2. Chiming in days late and Euros short . . .

          The key -- for me -- is what one is eating. OK, I know that sounds obvious, but my point is: do you enjoy jamón ibérico de bellota in a vacuum? All by itself? No other dishes on the table?

          Sometimes that is absolutely true. I *love* jamón ibérico, and there are certainly times when I feel the ibérico de bellota is worth the premium. And we have been known, when in Spain, to indulge in a bit of this wonderful meat all by itself. On those occasions, we *have* enjoyed a glass of Rioja with the jamón, and it's been a beautiful combination. Indeed, when there, and ordering tapas/pintxos, they typically arrive one at a time -- making it easy (well, easier anyway) to order different wines with different pintxos.

          However, typically we are having the jamón with *other* plates of tapas/pintxos and -- almost always here in the States, at least -- they all arrive at one time. In that case, we might go with Fino/Manzanilla or another wine that will compliment a broader array of the dishes set down before us.