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passover recap: What did you buy and never open?

I'll start.

wine vinegar
ketchup

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  1. I think we tried everything. How do you not use ketchup?! :-)

    6 Replies
    1. re: DeisCane

      Bet your kids won't use it up now that Heinz is back.

      1. re: AdinaA

        When ketchup is merely an ingredient (e.g., sweet and sour brisket), I use the KP version until it's finished, but frankly, we have very little left.

      2. re: DeisCane

        We stopped buying it because it sat in the fridge the whole rest of the year. No one wanted to eat it. This year we went Belgian-style with our fries and served them with homemade mayo. I ate mine plain. Beats eating that nasty KLP ketchup.

        1. re: rockycat

          Makes sense. I always make sweet and sour brisket for seder, which involves about a half bottle of ketchup, so it's a no brainer.

          1. re: DeisCane

            How do you make sweet and sour brisket? I overbuy KLP ketchup even though the kids don't like it all that much. Eventually, they get used to the flavor and I'm all over anything that doesn't have high fructose corn syrup.

        2. re: DeisCane

          I've really pared down my Pesach buying just so that I don't end up with all the things no one wants. All I have leftover are things that were bought by other people. I have an extra KLP confectioners' sugar because the person getting it for me forgot how much I asked for and I have some extra boxes of jelly candy because they were gifts from my college-age niece whose mother probably sent too much in her care package. We supply her with KLP Coke which she prefers over candy anyhow.

        3. All of the macaroons. But I am sure they will go!

          1. A tin of foie gras from France.

            4 Replies
            1. re: ferret

              did you get that in france?

              1. re: koshergourmetmart

                Got it through connections in France (if I told you, I'd have to kill you...). Have had it in years past and even my liver-loathing wife enjoyed it. Got it months ago and forgot it was in the pantry.

                1. re: koshergourmetmart

                  KGM--

                  FWIW, it's available here in London.

                  1. re: DeisCane

                    It's kind of a shame that one of the better foie gras producers in the US (Hudson Valley) is owned by two Israelis but they don't make a Kosher version.

              2. Whole wheat matzo farfel. Many jars of tomato sauce and tomato puree. Granola (and I use the term very loosely) breakfast cereal.

                1 Reply
                1. re: helou

                  I made homemade farfel granola, it was really good. Also used as topping for a baked apple crumble. If you want to use it up...

                2. Marshmallows
                  Cotton Candy
                  Pepsi

                  My 71 year old sister in law decided she's on a diet and these were purchased at her request.

                  1. Norman's yogurt - woefully inferior brand. Several containers opened and tasted, not eaten. remaining unopened containers pitched out.

                    2 Replies
                    1. re: AdinaA

                      Did you buy the Greek style? That stuff is truly vile. Seriously , wallpaper paste is better

                      1. re: AdinaA

                        I like Norman's lowfat yogurt quite well, but the vast majority of their yogurt is particularly bad nonfat yogurt. Then again, I tend to think all nonfat yogurt is vile.

                      2. Great topic :).
                        Baking supplies: cocoa, powdered sugar & cute disposable mini-cupcake tins. All I ended up baking was 2 batches of cookies (ground fruit & almond cookies). The rest I bought ready-made.
                        Canned tuna.
                        A pack of precut sheets of foil -- which I plan to use for Shabbat during the year.

                        1. As far as cocoa, I bought two 32-oz packages at the end of Passover when they were reduced to 99 cents each! Also imitation soy sauce (for my friend who can't have soy products),

                          Other stuff I didn't open were macaroons, lots of the free matzoh (but I eat it year-round so who cares?), some of the tuna (good for several years still), and a bunch of other stuff that we buy year-round anyway.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: eleeper

                            There's nothing different about cocoa so that's a great purchase! (I did the same!)

                          2. Great topic. Wine vinegar. I mean we had the best of intentions to eat lots of salads with dressing made from that vinegar, but somehow Pesach always ends up being our 1 week Paleo diet.

                            2 Replies
                            1. re: Kosher Carnivore

                              That's funny, and so true. As he bustled around setting out the 9th formal, 3-course meal (supper on Tuesday) of the passover eating marathon our host looked at the array of small plated holding pickles, cooked salads, raw vegetable salads, and cold fish already filling the dining table and asked, should I make the green leafy salad i have planned? The answer was no. Washing and chopping another bowl of vegetable just seemed like more work than anyone was up for.

                              1. re: AdinaA

                                Monday night, I prepared a bit meal, and ended up making the salad. (Mesclun with green apple, Persian cucumbers, and avocado.)
                                No one touched it :(

                            2. Matzoh ball soup mix. I ended up having matzoh ball soup once at seder despite the fact that I love it and could probably eat nothing else for a week and be happy.

                              6 Replies
                              1. re: CloggieGirl

                                I bought 3 boxes (don't ask me why) and didn't open any of them

                                1. re: cheesecake17

                                  must be nice. I made almost 450 matzo balls this Pesach (and we only had 12 sleep in house guests for the holidays, but MIL lives next door and SIL's family 4 doors away and they all eat here) and had none left last night.
                                  When the Streit's Matzo Ball Mix went on sale at $1/box two weeks before Pesach, I bought 120 boxes to get us through the year.

                                  1. re: bagelman01

                                    Woah that's a lot of matzah balls!

                                    Anytime I make chicken soup with matzah balls, my husband tells me he prefers his mother's version. (She uses the soup mix)

                                    1. re: cheesecake17

                                      Mrs. B and eldest daughter eat matzo balls without the soup, as a meal or snack, or the starch with meat/poultry.

                                      I also use them in the gantzeh tzimmes and in "mex necks and balls, which has chicken necks, meat balls and matzo balls baked in salsa.

                                      Soup is served at both lunch and supper each day, so we end up using many matzo balls, not just in chicken soup.

                                      I usually end up cooking about 50 per day pareve(yes I do have large pareve keilim for Pesach) so that they can go in milchige or fleischige soups.

                                      Both Mrs B and her mother tell me I make the best matzo balls and soup, much better than they do (I think it's so they don't have to do the work). My mother also used the soup mix,we used to refer to her chicken soup as 'salt soup.' I'm glad she hasn't made it in 40 years.

                                      I

                                      1. re: bagelman01

                                        I think I'm going to move into your house next pesach!

                                        MIL is not the best cook. Salty/oily/simultaneously under- and overcooked

                                    2. re: bagelman01

                                      Why use the mix? They are so easy to make---though not in huge quantities. They always come out better when I make them later in the week for 4 or 6 than for 25 at my Seder.

                                2. Tuna fish and almond flour.

                                  1. Didn't open any but one of the non-Gebrukt cakes we purchased. Our usual brownies and sponge cake were enough. Didn't open the second eggplant parmisian. It was okay the first time, but once was enough. Would like to say that our obsession this year was avocadoes. We probably went through about 20 with various types of guacamole. Was pleased that the shredded cole slaw did not go bad and the non-Gebrukts matza ball mix from Liebers didn't disappoint once again.

                                    1. I didn't use the ketchup because my kids were not home.
                                      Mishpacha ketchup is actually pretty good, but they don't sell it where I live now. I will use it up in Russian dressing for corned beef sandwiches.

                                      We also had a bottle of diet Coke left, 2 cans of very $$$ tuna, some of the spices, one package of quinoa, one marble cake and some Meal Mart kugels. I will use all of it during the year except the tuna and spices, which I have put away for next year. I am going to try to keep the quinoa until next year.

                                      4 Replies
                                      1. re: SoCal Mother

                                        Yeah, I just picked up a couple of more things heavily reduced that I can next year (expiration dates being far enough in the future): ketchup and gefilte fish. Mark makes Russian dressing (with crumbled egg) as his Pesach salad dressing, and also makes a ketchup/honey-based BBQ sauce, so ketchup is more an ingredient than something we eat as is.

                                        I must make a note for next year to hit all the supermarkets nearby on Day 6 or so and see what I can scoop up on sale!

                                        1. re: eleeper

                                          I found that this year all the supermarkets were cleaned out when I went back on chol hamoed. I wasn't necessarily looking for bargains, just some basic stuff that I ran out of (cake meal), or ingredients for recipes I decided to make. There was almost nothing. I couldn't even find things like potato chips after the first days.
                                          I think the supermarkets this year had the usual variety, but much less of each item so they wouldn't get stuck.

                                          1. re: helou

                                            That's why I overbuy. You really can't count on finding stuff chol hamoed. Food, you'll find; but often you will not find the specific ingredient you need.

                                            1. re: AdinaA

                                              That's been our experience. This year we were in Toronto, and my wife went shopping on Thursday of Chol Hamoed, and said the shelves at the regular supermarket were still full of stuff compared to Shoprite in NJ

                                      2. How many are you? Our immediate family is just 4, but we can sleep up to 20 comfortably........................warning we have 4 dogs and 2 cats. We're not black hat, Mrs. B wears pants and we have mixed swimming in our pool and hot tub.

                                        My first MIL was a terrible cook, and stingy as well. She'd make exactly one piece (1/8) of chicken for each person at the seder, one piece of fish, one potato, one spoon of carrots. I think it stems from growing up in depression/Nazi germany and then the deprivation/food shortages in Palestine/Israel from 1939-1953. After 3 years I told my ex: from now on I'm making Pesach, your parents and sister('s family) can come to us, but I'm not going there anymore.

                                        My current MIL (80+) is a wonderful person and am told she was a great cook in her day. But since she lives across our driveway (when she became a widow we built a home for her on our land) we send supper most evenings. However, there are certain specialties she makes that I love. For Pesach, she came to our house and made a lot of side dishes, with our girls doing the scut work. That way her grandchildren got to have certain food that was traditional in Mrs. B's family, not just from my side.

                                        1 Reply
                                        1. re: bagelman01

                                          I'll be there! It's me, husband, and a 3yo. Be warned though, the 3yo is mischievous and will climb almost anything :)

                                          Honestly, MIL tries, but she's just not a good cook. She's forever following recipes but they're just not from great sources

                                        2. I pretty much opened everything, but I wish I hadn't opened some things. I tried the Gefen gluten free pasta. Horrible product that couldn't be saved! Be warned fellow Chowhounders, it is an awful product!

                                          16 Replies
                                          1. re: sharonfl

                                            Oh, I tried once. Like eating solid glue.

                                            1. re: AdinaA

                                              Glue with some slime thrown in! Weirdest stuff ever; some of the "pasta" was soft and some of it was hard and no matter how much sauce and flavored oil I added, it was basically inedible. The product should be outlawed!

                                              1. re: sharonfl

                                                stopped at fairway in pelham on the way home to see what was left on their shelves from pesach, and one of the stock boys told me that 2 people came in last monday (im guessing not jewish bc it was yt) and bought full carts of everything labeled gluten free!

                                                1. re: shoelace

                                                  Won't be a problem next year. i mean, they'll get home, they'll boil up a package of potato-starch noodles, and they'll never shop the Pesach aisle again.

                                                  1. re: AdinaA

                                                    that exactly what i said- some of this stuff is so vile!

                                                    1. re: AdinaA

                                                      On the other hand, if they generally eat gluten-free, they probably are used to things not tasting exactly the way that the normal versions taste.

                                                      1. re: queenscook

                                                        Let them eat (flourless cocolate) cake.

                                                        1. re: queenscook

                                                          Perhaps, but there are definitely better options out there such as corn-, rice- and quinoa-based pastas. The last of which could theoretically be made KLP for Ashkenazim unless the quinoa question continues to recur. I wonder if I could get KLP rice flour and make all manner of rice noodles next year. There are plenty of other options, I know, but it could be an interesting challenge since I finally made the aioli this year that I'd been planning to make for the past 5 years.

                                                          1. re: CloggieGirl

                                                            It's a business opportunity for someone: Pesachdik quinoa flour; Pesachdik rice flour l'ochlei kitniyot; noodles; muffins; ... the mind boggles.

                                                            Of course, we all know that within living memory Italian Jews used supervised WHEAT flour to make fresh spaghetti on Pesach and Libyan Jews used it to make fresh, soft matzo.

                                                            Back in the real world, you can buy a home food mill (stores in about 1 cubic foot of space, costs ~$200 eg. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001...) and make your own Pesach flour

                                                2. re: sharonfl

                                                  I bought 2 boxes of Pesach fruit loop type cereal for grand kids , and honestly thought it was made from cardboard. The kids unanimously rejected it.

                                                  1. re: 4greatkds

                                                    We had some Pesach cereal left over one year and even the birds wouldn't eat it!

                                                    1. re: 4greatkds

                                                      An OT friend of mine collects the front loop type pesach cereal. She uses it with her clients to practice stringing and beading

                                                      1. re: cheesecake17

                                                        I'm an OT and hubby and I are ROFLAO at best use of a Pesach product yet! We tried the cheerio style ones once.. just plain bad..

                                                        1. re: chompie

                                                          I knew someone would get a laugh out of that :)

                                                          Apparently they don't crumble as quickly as froot loops

                                                          1. re: cheesecake17

                                                            Fresh Direct has them on sale, if your friend is looking for more.

                                                            1. re: CloggieGirl

                                                              I think she's got enough for the next decade!

                                                  2. I always buy too much matzah meal and too much dried fruit. (Although can one eat too much dried fruit during Pesach???)

                                                    1. Why use the mix? Over the years I have found that the Streit's mix has the exact flavoring and measurements to make what Mrs. B considers her favorite Matzo Ball. an Mrs. B eats Matzo Balls a couple times per week year round.

                                                      Using the Streit's mix: I use for a batch of 50 matzo balls:
                                                      14 extra large eggs (room Temp) whisked with 1 1/2 cups oil, then fold in the mix with a hand spatula. I leave them in a large stainless bowl to set for 30 minutes. I do NOT refrigerate the mix. Then they are shaped and dropped into a 24 qt npot of rapidly boiling water. I cover tightly, and reduce the flame to its lowest setting. I then set the timer for 35 minutes.

                                                      After 35 minutes, I remove with a slotted spoon, placing the matzo balls on baker's cooling racks to drain and firm. When room temperature I cover with tea towels if being used within 3 hours or place in airtight containers and refrigerate.

                                                      Over the years, I have tried assorted recipes, and one comesclose to the consistency of the Streit'smix. It is the one 'prepared' or mix I use on Pesach, everything else is from scratch.

                                                      8 Replies
                                                      1. re: bagelman01

                                                        Agree that Streit's is probably the best out there.

                                                        1. re: DeisCane

                                                          Streits is good but I also like Croyden House -

                                                          1. re: weinstein5

                                                            Sticking up for homemade. It's so easy. You make the chicken soup. You remove the chicken and whatever veggies you use (you're doing this anyway). You skim off the fat and as much liquid as required - a quick, one spoon operation. Add matzoh meal and eggs. Chill dough thoroughly. Perfect matzo balls. The only labor involved is shaping the balls, which you have to do with a mix, too. Plus, for my taste the mixes have way too much sodium.

                                                        2. re: bagelman01

                                                          Yup. I don't know what it is, but it always works out better than other mixes or recipes I've tried. Guests always like it too. Sure, mixing the dough isn't that hard but it's one less thing to think about. Also, there's at least one thing every year that requires salvaging or tossing because I'm cooking 5 things at once and forget that I've doubled or halved a recipe. I would be sad if that thing ended up being matzoh balls.

                                                          This year, it was pancakes while trying to prep food for the last two days. I forgot to reduce the amount of salt. Not horrible but certainly noticeable. When I made another batch the next day, they were declared delicious. This means that I no longer have to try to duplicate matzoh brei the way my husband's grandmother used to make. The pancakes tasted a bit matzoh-y and weren't that fluffy (I was sick of whipping egg whites, which might have helped) but we both thoroughly enjoyed them.

                                                          1. re: bagelman01

                                                            For some reason my matzaballs take way longer than 35 minutes. I just made a batch and it took over
                                                            an hour until they weren't raw on the inside. Each one is the size of a tablespoon(when I shape them and put them in the water)- so I doubt that it's an issue of them being too big. Any idea what I am doing incorrectly?

                                                            1. re: EmpireState

                                                              How dense are they? Is your water boiling? What is the temperature of the matza ball before going in the water?

                                                              1. re: avitrek

                                                                Water is boiling. The matza balls go in cold. I shape them with a small cookie scoop.

                                                                1. re: EmpireState

                                                                  How big a pot?

                                                          2. Potato starch
                                                            brownie mix
                                                            sour cream

                                                            4 Replies
                                                            1. re: evalinrose

                                                              Potato starch keeps til next year, or next millennium.

                                                              Seriously, I do use it, year after year. In certain recipes. What not to do is to use it up during the regular year. Inferior to corn starch in every way.

                                                              1. re: AdinaA

                                                                I'm sure it will be fine next year. I already packed it away in the Passover Pantry along with my ongoing collection of KFP spices.

                                                                1. re: AdinaA

                                                                  Agree throughout. But I have used it instead of corn starch in a pinch. Because I always have so much it never runs out! :-)

                                                                  1. re: AdinaA

                                                                    I use potato starch as body powder & put it in my Crocs to keep them from getting overly sweaty in summer. Def beats cornstarch in that arena.

                                                                2. this is funny... every year I try to buy less and less packaged goods and yet I still have a bag full to give to the tzedakah food pantry -- 2 boxes matzah, 1 box egg matzah, 1 can farfel, 1 can cake meal, 2 boxes of ready-made cake. I bought the pesachdik cold cereal one year when kids were little, and yes, even the birds wouldn't eat it.

                                                                  1. A friend of mine answers: Chopped almonds.

                                                                    1. Not enough boiling water in too small a pot. Matzo balls need lot of room in a large and wide pot (not just tall) If it's taking that long to cook them through you have to many matzo balls cooking for the size of the pot and amount of water.

                                                                      Rule of thumb: 24 matzo balls need 10 quarts boiling water in a 12 quart pot. The timing starts after all the matzo balls have been dropped into the water, the lid put in tightly and the heat reduced to a minimum.

                                                                      ALSO>>>>make sure the water is a furious rolling boil befre you start putting the matzo balls in the water. It a a gentle boil the temperature will drop too fast

                                                                      13 Replies
                                                                      1. re: bagelman01

                                                                        What Avitrek and Bagelman said, plus if the boil tapers as you load the broth with matzo balls, pause until it is again at a rolling boil, then resume inserting matzo balls. you can do this in smaller volumes of broth, just keep that boil rolling.

                                                                        1. re: bagelman01

                                                                          Thanks! I will try a larger pot next time. Hopefully that will do the trick.

                                                                          1. re: EmpireState

                                                                            We did better than usual this year. Didn't finish our Manny's Matzoh cuz it was like eating plastic/glass. Anyone else find it a weird hard consistency this year? Stuck mostly to Streits Egg Matzo, our flaky softish favorite. Also hubby bought two giant matzo meals instead of the smaller ones, so have one left and also Matzo Ball mix we were going to try cuz last year ours were rocks.. But we got served matzo balls twice so never made it.. We also have a Gefen cake mix left. which were very good, especially the brownies, but agree with their pasta which we wish we didn't open. I had it for lunch the last day and hubby refused and said it was a terrible last taste of Pesach so we made a nice Pesach supper and ended Pesach the next day instead..

                                                                            1. re: chompie

                                                                              I don't know whether you're aware that Ashkenazim are not allowed to eat egg matzah on Pesach, unless they're unable to eat normal matzah. There should be a note to that effect on the box, but it may be a bit obscure. I remember one brand used to simply have a note saying "for the laws of eating egg matzah see Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim ch 462"; most people wouldn't know how to look that up.

                                                                              1. re: zsero

                                                                                thanks...I actually always thought it was just for the seder, not for the week.. So we use regular at Seder.. My teeth couldn't take the regular all week tho!

                                                                                1. re: chompie

                                                                                  It varies within Ashkenazim. Most of the Ashkenazim I know will have egg matzoh outside of seder but not matzah ashirah made with wine or fruit juice. Consult with your applicable kashrut authorities as you feel necessary.

                                                                                  1. re: CloggieGirl

                                                                                    Isn't egg matzo usually made with fruit juice? See for example Manischewitz:
                                                                                    http://www.amazon.com/Manischewitz-Pa...

                                                                                    1. re: CloggieGirl

                                                                                      1. There is no legal difference between wine, fruit juice, and eggs. Matzah made with any of these is matzah ashira, and subject to the same requirement that it not contain even a drop of water, and the same Ashkenazi ruling that since it's difficult to be sure that no water at all has entered the process, only those who have no alternative (i.e. normal matzah is too tough for their teeth, or lack thereof) may eat it.

                                                                                      2. In any case, all commercial "egg matzah" contains fruit juice as well as egg.

                                                                                      Note that Sefardim agree that one drop of water would make the whole batch chametz. They are just more confident of their ability to ensure that this will not happen.

                                                                                      Also note that modern machine production makes it *more* difficult to ensure that no water has entered the process. If the machines are cleaned with water, how do they ensure that they're completely dry before adding the ingredients?

                                                                                      1. re: zsero

                                                                                        So why did the OU make a big deal of certifying things as "matzah ashirah" this year if they've been certifying egg matzot for years? Since I eat them either way, I've never paid close attention to the distinctions.

                                                                                        1. re: CloggieGirl

                                                                                          The egg matzos have for years had a Ashkenazi-centric notice on the box that they're only for those who can't eat normal matzah. (As I said before, sometimes this notice was so obscure as to be useless, but it was there.) This year the OU started catering to Sefardi consumers, who allow matza ashira for all, confident that all water was kept out of the process. (How one can achive this in an industrial setting, I don't know.)

                                                                              2. re: EmpireState

                                                                                I have a question for you mavens of Passover... I have always wondered if there are any rulings, laws or traditions regarding eating Pesach food after the holiday.. I figure everyone eats matzo balls and matzo brei all year, but I have wondered about the other leftover stuff. We love Pesach food and when they sell the leftover stuff for 75% off I am always tempted to keep eating it during the year, but I feel like maybe it takes away from the specialness. Also I feel funny when I mix things Pesach and non.. like Passover cake and regular ice cream or pudding. Is there anything against mixing things together or eating stuff after the week is over, or can I go hog wild?(oops, inadvertent not very kosher expression used there....:)

                                                                                1. re: chompie

                                                                                  It's close to a week later, and I'm still eating my matzah lasagna. Except for challah, my entire shabbos was Pesach leftovers: chicken soup, fruit soup, brisket, meatballs, three kugels, sorbet, and meringues. If we hadn't gone out for dinner today, I would have eaten Pesachdik today. I think I have another two or three servings of the lasagna, which I'll continue to eat 'til it's gone.

                                                                                  Now, I don't really buy much processed/prepared food for Pesach . . . not because of halacha or minhag, just because I make most things myself. Still, I do buy things like marinara sauce, and I don't think there's much wrong with eating that stuff during the year. And aside from my kugels having matzoh meal and/or farfel, and the matzah lasagna, most of what I make is not specific to Pesach. Meatballs are meatballs, brisket is brisket, etc.

                                                                                  1. re: chompie

                                                                                    No problem. Some people have the custom not to eat matzah after Purim, so it will be special when Pesach comes. But until Purim there's nothing to worry about.

                                                                              3. I have a very literal answer to this question. ALL MY CANNED GOODS. I realized only once Pesach started that I didn't have a can opener, and didn't really need the canned goods like tomato paste, pineapple, etc. That's what you get for making Pesach for the first time!

                                                                                8 Replies
                                                                                1. re: DevorahL

                                                                                  Very funny. I do used canned tomato paste. And I usually buy hearts of palm and artichoke hearts because they are good in salads and without requiring refrigerator space.

                                                                                  1. re: DevorahL

                                                                                    Among the truly useful things is making a list of things like a can opener to buy before next Pesach.

                                                                                    1. re: AdinaA

                                                                                      I keep fairly accurate records in a file in the computer, and make notes like that during chol ha'moed and when Pesach ends, so I'll see it when I begin to plan my menu, shopping, etc. Last year, for instance, I put a note in to remind myself to polish the Pesach silver (kiddush cups, etc.). It didn't get done, of course, but at least the note was there!!

                                                                                      1. re: AdinaA

                                                                                        I'm just curious, why not buy a can opener during Passover? Sorry if I'm ignorant about it...

                                                                                        1. re: chompie

                                                                                          You could buy one during chol hamoed. But the big prep work is usually for the first two days anyhow.

                                                                                          1. re: DeisCane

                                                                                            But most of that prep is before chag when you could buy a can opener too. I think the real answer is Devorah didn't need any of the canned products so never felt compelled to buy a can opener.

                                                                                            1. re: avitrek

                                                                                              It's also a sex/gender and generational thing. Those of us older males can remember being on a camping trip having forgotten the can opener and using a strong knife, or a hammer and nail to open cans...................

                                                                                              It's 50 years since I became a Boy Scout, but I remember the motto: Be Prepared.

                                                                                              1. re: bagelman01

                                                                                                Yeah well I have a friend who has had multiple surgeries and has lost partial use of his hand from trying to open a bottle of wine with a knife.