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Le BAT and Bones - 2 Winners, One Day

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On our most recent trips to Paris, we haven't usually eaten two big meals per day - it's either a big lunch and a light dinner, or the reverse.

So, what happens when there are two real meals scheduled for one day. Not a problem, especially when the early meal is at Le BAT, and one can have a simple salad as your plat. But even the 2 and 3 course lunches are a bargain.

And if Bones is dinner on that same day? Consider yourself lucky, as we did...

http://tastytravails.blogspot.com/201...

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  1. Thanks for reporting back. And I love your blog ! :)

    1. I love your blog, too. The only place I've ever found cuttlefish is in a Portuguese restaurant in RI, where it's grilled. I like it a lot and have often wondered why it's so seldom used here. Is it starting to show up on French menus, or was this unusual do you think?

      Those 2- and 3-course lunches do seem like a bargain. I'm putting both places on my list. Thanks.

      18 Replies
      1. re: ccferg

        Cuttlefish, seppie in Italian, is a staple here in Italy.

        1. re: allende

          Squid, as you know allende, is very popular in RI, thanks to our Italian population. But for some reason cuttlefish was never embraced here. I don't even see it in the Italian fish markets. I believe it's very plentiful so it's always baffled me.

          1. re: ccferg

            ccferg: It is also immensely popular on the Iberian coasts, and also in China, Korea, Japan, and south Asia. Of course Italy but not only. I love Spanish squid, for both the taste and how it is cooked there.

            1. re: Parigi

              Thanks, Parigi. Is "Spanish squid" synonymous with cuttlefish? We eat mountains of squid -- or calamari -- in southern New England, but except for that Portuguese restaurant I've never seen cuttlefish (closely related to squid, but as I understand it, not the same thing).

              1. re: ccferg

                Indeed. And I meant cuttlefish, especially the ink. But the Spanish also make a mean squid. Am big fan of Spain. :)

              2. re: Parigi

                And it is a staple of Southern French cuisine, particularly in Languedoc where it is an ingredient of seiches à la sétoise (seiches à la rouille) and tielle.

                1. re: Ptipois

                  The tielle sétoise has been calling my name ! Am so going to do tielle intravenously come June.

                  1. re: Parigi

                    Parigi, I just googled tielle setoise and I want one right now! The BBC recipe I found called for "1 small squid," but I'm sure they're talking about cuttlefish because they say it should weigh about about 1 pound. What we call squid in southern New England aren't nearly that big -- you usually get about 10 squid in a pound.

                    1. re: ccferg

                      To be totally confusing, I must say that the tielle I had contained squid - calamar - and not cuttlefish, and I have had it many times.
                      I won't swear that someone won't use cuttlefish in a recipe.

                      1. re: ccferg

                        Squid is no good for tielle anyway, you need seiche which is fleshier and more tender. Usually you only use the "blanc", the mantle.

                        1. re: Ptipois

                          I've never had tielle, but in looking at the recipes I found, it was pretty clear I wouldn't be able to substitute the readily available squid for seiche/cuttlefish. I'm sure the squid would get rubbery and/or lost. Cuttlefish really is much fleshier and (from my limited experience) stays more tender when cooked for more than a few minutes. You've got me dreaming now of a trip to Languedoc.

                          1. re: ccferg

                            Alll the Tielle I had in Sète used calamar. But unlike NYT journalists, I don't intimate that I have tried all the tielles in Sète and have thus attained authority.

                            1. re: Parigi

                              I'm wondering if the calamar they use there are bigger than the ones they sell here in RI.

                              1. re: ccferg

                                Yeah, calamar from Chernobyl, which they have the gall to call calamari.

                                1. re: Parigi

                                  You're kidding, right? That's horrifying.

                              2. re: Parigi

                                Or is it possible that restaurateurs are sometimes casual about using the words "calamar" and "seiche" in prepared foods interchangeably? According to Wikepedia, that happens in -- god forgive me, I know I'm unleashing something scary -- Italy.

                                1. re: ccferg

                                  Yes, very scary:)

              3. re: ccferg

                Thanks for the blog love (blove?). Trust me, were it not for CH and a few other places around the 'net, I wouldn't have found these places on my own.

                More reports shortly.