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Passover meatball recipe

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AdinaA Mar 18, 2014 02:12 PM

Quinoa (cooked) works really nicely to lighten meatballs for Pesach. And meatballs in sauce are a really good make-ahead Pesach dish; they freeze so well. Just sharing a thought I had as I work out the menu, make-ahead schedule.

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  1. bagelman01 RE: AdinaA Mar 18, 2014 02:20 PM

    I also find that if you cube (1/2") eggplant and microwave a few minutes, you can mash it into the meatball mixture to lighten and extend....
    They freeze very well and are especially good in tomato sauce recipes. I do not like them in beef gravy or sweet and sour meatball presentations.

    4 Replies
    1. re: bagelman01
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      cheesecake17 RE: bagelman01 Mar 18, 2014 03:56 PM

      I like that idea! Kid's favorite meal is meatballs. Will have to try this

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        SoCal Mother RE: cheesecake17 Mar 18, 2014 04:02 PM

        I substitute matza for my usual slice of bread, no problem.

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          cheesecake17 RE: SoCal Mother Mar 19, 2014 07:29 AM

          I usually use a handful of matzah meal. But harm in extra veg...

        2. re: cheesecake17
          bagelman01 RE: cheesecake17 Mar 18, 2014 05:53 PM

          My ex-MIL lived in Palestine from 1939 on (came to US in 1953) meat was in very short supply and eggplant and other vegetables were used as extenders/fillers. To this day she still makes meatballs and meatloaf with the eggplant in it. I always used it to both keep the meat moist and get vegetables into my kids.

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        MartyB RE: AdinaA Mar 18, 2014 05:48 PM

        I just replace breadcrumbs with matzoh meal in my recipe.

        1. gotcholent RE: AdinaA Mar 18, 2014 06:43 PM

          Shredded apple is another great filler that also is phenomenal in helping to retain moisture. A personal favorite, stolen from my first college roommate's mother's arsenal, is a mixed meatball and matza ball dish, 50 percent of each, simmered in a sweet'n'sour sauce. It doubles your servings without doubling the price, has some wow factor, and is killer when made using shmurah matza.

          10 Replies
          1. re: gotcholent
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            ahuva RE: gotcholent Mar 18, 2014 08:04 PM

            does that mean that you mix the meat mixture with the matzoh ball mixture or that you make matzoh balls and meatballs and simmer together?

            1. re: ahuva
              gotcholent RE: ahuva Mar 19, 2014 04:17 PM

              Nope....we make the meatballs, add them to our sweet and sour sauce and then add the raw matzah balls to cook in the sauce as well. They fluff up and turn a wonderful red color. You end up with a two tone dish unless you happen to use the shmura which have a darker color and are almost indistinguishable from the real deal. In fact we have used shmura (bought on sale after the chag) to make a fantastic vegetarian main reinventing this recipe using half shmura balls and half matza balls. For pesach, my family has been designing our meal around the 10 plagues to really get our young boys (6,4 & 2) into the whole thing. Quinoa as lice, pesto chicken wing "frog-legs" and this mixed matza ball/meat ball combo has made a killer hail & brimstone.

              1. re: gotcholent
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                arifree RE: gotcholent Mar 19, 2014 04:38 PM

                I don't know what you'll do for the 10th plague but I'm sure it will be delicious!

                1. re: arifree
                  gotcholent RE: arifree Mar 20, 2014 08:03 AM

                  We've played with baby heirloom carrots, veal and cornish hens in the past for #10. Not sure about this year just yet. Any suggestions?

                  1. re: gotcholent
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                    arifree RE: gotcholent Mar 20, 2014 01:54 PM

                    baby chicken and baby bok choy?

                    Or...since the 10th plague is last how about...Death by Chocolate

                    edit: after checking wikipedia, DbC can be a flourless chocolate cake. Aha perfect!

                    1. re: arifree
                      queenscook RE: arifree Mar 20, 2014 02:09 PM

                      Death by Chocolate can also be for the plague of darkness.

                      1. re: queenscook
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                        arifree RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 04:05 PM

                        Well, I was also thinking maybe it could have some mint leaves (or hyssop) and cherry sauce on the sides.

                2. re: gotcholent
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                  SoCal Mother RE: gotcholent Mar 19, 2014 06:59 PM

                  wait, the matza balls cook in the sauce? you don't boil them at all?

                  this I gotta try!

                  1. re: SoCal Mother
                    bagelman01 RE: SoCal Mother Mar 20, 2014 01:04 AM

                    I make a gantzeh Tzimmes for the luncheon meal first day of Pesach. It contains all the dried fruits, vegetables, honey, cinnamon, a brisket and 24 matzo balls. It is cooked covered in the oven low and slow (250 degrees F for about 6 hours). The matzo balls are put in raw about 3/4 of the way down. They cook in the fruit juices,meat juices and honey, absorbing the cinnamon and all the wonderful flavors. Unlike my soup matzo balls which are floaters,these will be sinkers and can be eaten with a knfe and fork.

                    For Rosh HaShanah, I make a similar dish, but use drop biscuits or dumplings instead of the matzo balls.

                    1. re: bagelman01
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                      SoCal Mother RE: bagelman01 Mar 20, 2014 09:34 AM

                      Bagelman01, that sounds wonderful!

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              ahuva RE: AdinaA Mar 18, 2014 08:05 PM

              you can also try adding in potato flakes (instant mashed potatoes flakes) - it'll extend the meat and make for very soft balls.

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                cheesecake17 RE: AdinaA Mar 19, 2014 07:30 AM

                Maybe this is silly, but how do you serve your meatballs on pesach? I won't buy the pesach noodles (they're gross) and there's only so much rice I'm willing to check/clean.

                20 Replies
                1. re: cheesecake17
                  queenscook RE: cheesecake17 Mar 19, 2014 07:39 AM

                  I don't necessarily serve them with anything, but you can do quinoa if you feel the need to nest them on something.

                  1. re: queenscook
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                    cheesecake17 RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 06:51 AM

                    We don't eat quinoa. (All year, not just Passover). I think it tastes like dirt, husband and daughter won't touch it!

                    1. re: cheesecake17
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                      SoCal Mother RE: cheesecake17 Mar 20, 2014 09:37 AM

                      No worries this year cheesecake17, quinoa will be difficult to obtain in most cities.

                      Although I personally love quinoa, I can't eat anything with cilantro (trendy overused herb that seems to get into EVERYTHING these days) so I completely feel your pain.

                      1. re: SoCal Mother
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                        arifree RE: SoCal Mother Mar 20, 2014 02:04 PM

                        One should never feel guilty for not liking certain things. Food should be a pleasure, not a challenge (I hate the whole idea behind 'Bizarre Food' and 'Man vs Food').

                      2. re: cheesecake17
                        queenscook RE: cheesecake17 Mar 20, 2014 09:59 AM

                        Maybe you're not washing it well enough. Although most quinoa comes washed these days, some still probably tastes like it needs to be washed.

                        Actually, now that I think about it, the Pesach couscous that I have bought for the past two years, has been very tasty. it's actual Israeli couscous, not made from potato starch or some other Passover substitute. That would go very well with meatballs.

                        1. re: queenscook
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                          avitrek RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 10:21 AM

                          Israeli Cous Cous is basically a type of pasta. It's made with wheat. I don't know what they use on Passover, but it must be some kind of Passover substitute.

                          1. re: avitrek
                            queenscook RE: avitrek Mar 20, 2014 01:56 PM

                            No, you are incorrect.

                            There is probably more than one brand, but this is what the Pereg box says: "How is this product kosher for Passover? Pereg's Israeli couscous is made in the same process as matzo, it does not leaven. There is only 18-22 minutes permitted between mixing the flour and water, and removing the finished baked product from the oven. The mixing machines are stopped every 18 minutes to be cleaned,leaving no trace of dough that may leaven the next production round. All this guarantees an optimum kashrut result."

                            It's OU-P.

                            1. re: queenscook
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                              cheesecake17 RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 02:03 PM

                              Is this available everywhere? I'm going to look for it

                              1. re: cheesecake17
                                queenscook RE: cheesecake17 Mar 20, 2014 02:11 PM

                                I saw it everywhere last year. The box I just quoted from is left over from then, actually; haven't done any Pesach shopping yet for this year. If I see it any time soon, I'll try to remember to report this.

                                1. re: queenscook
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                                  cheesecake17 RE: queenscook Mar 21, 2014 06:56 AM

                                  Thanks. I've been avoiding the shopping. But I'll look for it

                              2. re: queenscook
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                                avitrek RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 08:28 PM

                                Interesting. So it's basically mini matzahs.

                                1. re: avitrek
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                                  AdinaA RE: avitrek Mar 21, 2014 03:50 AM

                                  No. It behaves and tastes like year-round Israeli couscous. It's real pasta with a real hechscher.

                            2. re: queenscook
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                              cheesecake17 RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 02:03 PM

                              I've tried different brands, washing it, not washing it, cooking it in stock vs water. I guess I just don't like it. I've never cared for anything with quinoa in restaurants either...

                              1. re: queenscook
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                                AdinaA RE: queenscook Mar 20, 2014 02:40 PM

                                The pesachdik couscous is wonderful!

                          2. re: cheesecake17
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                            Ulyyf RE: cheesecake17 Mar 19, 2014 08:04 AM

                            Depends on what you're making, I'm sure, but I find that mashed potatoes make a good substitute for noodles with Swedish meatballs and recipes of that ilk (not sure how I'd make that meal kosher....), and spaghetti squash or zucchini, of course, make a good sub for Italian pastas.

                            1. re: cheesecake17
                              bagelman01 RE: cheesecake17 Mar 19, 2014 11:25 AM

                              One of my teenagers' favorites is Mex Necks and Balls....
                              I bake the meatballs and chicken necks in a jar of Gold's Salsa..................

                              Served over a salad of greens

                              1. re: cheesecake17
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                                arifree RE: cheesecake17 Mar 19, 2014 01:08 PM

                                Pesach is a great time for trying out all those starchy vegetables such as plantains, yuca, taro, lotus root and everything else you may find in a bag of Terra chips.

                                1. re: cheesecake17
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                                  DevorahL RE: cheesecake17 Mar 20, 2014 07:45 AM

                                  Mashed potatoes or spaghetti squash!

                                  1. re: cheesecake17
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                                    AdinaA RE: cheesecake17 Mar 20, 2014 07:55 AM

                                    Many years ago, before the Inca discovered quinoa, I used to serve marzo farfel sauteed in browned onions as a side to dishes in a sauce, like meatballs.

                                    Of course mashed potatoes work, or boiled potatoes that you mash into the sauce with your fork, but so do other mashed winter vegetables. especially winter squash. You could serve meatballs in a bowl made out of an acorn squash or pumpkin.

                                    1. re: AdinaA
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                                      cheesecake17 RE: AdinaA Mar 20, 2014 02:04 PM

                                      Haha :)
                                      Mashed potatoes is a great idea. The kidlet loves them!

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