HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

An Antidote for Very Salty Food?

You know how there are certain foods that can help you from the effects of really hot chiles? (An Indian friend says cabbage is the best antidote.) Well, I had a very salty meal today, and I have been chugging water all day, but it just hasn't worked to nullify the dry mouth/cotton mouth feeling I've had all day. (I am also on a medication that contributes to this cotton mouth.) Is there a liquid or food that is known to be helpful with this? thx much.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
    1. I don't think so. I drink a lot of water in general and find that when I eat something with hidden salt, I puff up right away. Something diuretic, to help you shed the water that is carrying the salt, might help. Coffee or alcohol might be the way to go, but that's just a guess. Some diuretic foods are lemon, melon, celery, onion, and cucumber, but there are more. Whether or not they help a dry mouth, I don't know.

      1. I think you are going to have to let your cells deal with the sodium overload. Depending on your health this may take a few days.
        Drinking water will help but too much can cause your cells just as much trouble.
        Think 'homeostasis'. Be good to your cells.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Puffin3

          Yes, it can take days after just one salty meal.

        2. The better question is why you ate a very salty meal.

          1 Reply
          1. re: ferret

            Curious is to why is that better question? Sometime you don't realize how much salt is in something until you feel the effects. Other time you just can't resist. Corn beef and cabbage I am looking at you!

          2. I find adding fresh squeezed lemon to my water helps the dry mouth feeling. Also green tea helps me flush out excess sodium.

            Lastly my dad took meds that gave him dry mouth. There is an over the counter mouthwash that can help. I don't remember the name but maybe ask the pharmacist.

            6 Replies
            1. re: foodieX2

              want to thank you and the others for some very helpful replies. What's so strange for me-was that the meal in question (on top of the meds) contained no soy sauce or msg. It took about 2 days to get over that uber thirst, and i did try lemon juice and cukes- which seemed to help.Now, before i try that mouthwash (i hate mouthwash) i'm going back to my regular black iced tea, with which i use lemon, to see if that has a thirst lessening affect that i didn't realize before (I switch types of tea every few months.) Thx much again.

              1. re: opinionatedchef

                Soy sauce and msg are not the only sources of salt.

                1. re: fldhkybnva

                  yes, f, i am well aware of that because i look at sodium counts for everything nowadays. But i think of soy sauce, fish sauce, anchovies and msg being the heavy hitters in the salt realm.

                  1. re: opinionatedchef

                    Even regular soy sauce has anywhere between 800 - 1200mg of sodium per TBSP of 15g !!

                    I only buy the Kikkoman Lite, which is about half that for sodium.

                    1. re: opinionatedchef

                      True, though it's amazing the sodium they can cram into foods without those items :)

                    2. re: fldhkybnva

                      My worst saltbomb experience this year followed sharing some Turkish pide and an Ethiopian platter with 2 Chowhounds. I'm guessing we each ate around 1100-1400 calories that evening, but I'm guessing we got triple our daily recommended amount of salt. The boots I'd bought earlier that afternoon didn't fit the following morning, so I returned to the store, thinking I bought the boots a half size too short, to discover the new pair was almost a full size too large 2 days later, after the salt was gone.

                      Ethiopian Veg Platter
                      http://www.thestar.com/life/health_we...
                      Turkish Pide
                      http://www.thestar.com/life/health_we...