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Seconds "Sale" at Falk USA

FYI, the new incarnation of Falk in the USA is now offering their stockpot seconds at 25% off. http://www.falkusa.com/falk-copper-co... They are now merely offensively overpriced, as opposed to the repugnantly-priced firsts.

However, as is their wont, the necessary cover is neither included nor discounted ($95-$125 extra). I laugh every time I look at their steamer pan. Only $565 (excluding the cover grate--which cost another $155).

Who are they kidding?

Aloha,
Kaleo

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  1. BUT! they offer "free shipping" on orders over $1000.00 so there's that... :D

    3 Replies
    1. re: petek

      Hi, Pete:

      Good point. If you buy that steamer with cover and grate, you'd already be at $720. That and a 20cm saucepan ($320 + another $85 for the cover) would be more than one Grover Cleveland. AND free shipping?

      Why have I waited so long? :D

      Aloha,
      Kaleo

      1. re: kaleokahu

        I'm not familiar with Falk, what's your take on it(besides being overpriced)?

        1. re: petek

          Hi, Pete:

          It's really good stuff--probably 95th percentile of what is possible, and arguably the best cookware available worldwide, new, at retail.

          My quibbles with the brand (other than price) are minor in the cosmic scheme of things.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

    2. Hi Kallo,

      What do you think of the 18 cm Saucier? We took a cooking class/demonstration/dinner a couple of weeks ago and the chef made a big deal of using a saucier for roux for gumbo. This piece is their "Try Me" piece and is 25% off, which makes it expensive but reasonable. The same price essentially as a 2 qt. Viking. Since roux is so easy to burn, I might be able to talk Mrs mikie into one of these.

      5 Replies
      1. re: mikie

        Hi, mikie: "What do you think of the 18 cm Saucier?"

        I think it's a fine pan, and it is the best value in pans they offer.

        I am not an adoring fan of this particular shape, but there are many who are. If you have problems fitting a whisk into the corners of a conventional saucepan and/or want the "bombee" curved walls (as opposed to a evassee or Windsor's straight splayed sides), then there is no better new pan available, to my knowledge.

        It would make an excellent choice for adventures in saucing, and the SS lining should make it 90% worry-free from an owner's standpoint.

        Let's be clear, though. Too-high heat can burn roux in this pan faster than in that 2Q Viking--it will just burn more evenly. But with the *right* (read: somewhat lower than you're used to) heat, it will brown more evenly, and this pan's responsiveness means more "saves" when you must adjust.

        I seriously considered buying this pan when Michael Harp was the guy in charge. I didn't, mostly because I couldn't convince myself that 18cm was large enough. You have to ask yourself: "Large enough for *what*?", but bear in mind that this shape entails a substantial reduction in volume compared to a regular saucepan. This particular piece, while it is 18cm in diameter at the rim, holds but 1.3Q; this is the same volume as my conventional FOURTEEN cm saucepan.

        You might ask the new distributor if they would knock $60 off the 20cm saucier, which is the equivalent of a 16cm straight-wall pan. I think they might do that for a first-time customer; it wouldn't cost you anything to ask.

        I hope this helps,
        Aloha,
        Kaleo

        1. re: kaleokahu

          Kaleo, thank you. As usual you are a wealth of information and excellent suggestions.

          It did seem a bit small, but the roux recipe for a fair amount of gumbo was only 1 cup of oil and 1 of flour, so I'm thinking that would be large enough, however maybe not so good for other recipes. Definately something to consider.

          The chef at the demo meal, had a "big ass" commercial gas range and had the heat up fairly high when making the roux. He was using a Viking 3 qt. saucier because he was making a very large pot of gumbo for about 40 people. He emphasized the saucier shape so that you could wisk and not have dead spots that would burn and ruin the roux. "Once scorched your only alternative is to start over." I figure this might be one chance to explore the merrits of copper and get Mrs mikie on board. We lived in New Orleans for about 7 years and really like the Cajun food.

          1. re: mikie

            You're welcome, Mikie. Sounds like the 18cm is big enough, so it's a win-win.

            What's your fav resto in NOLA? I just got the Antoine's cookbook, and want to cook every recipe.

            Aloha,
            Kaleo

            1. re: kaleokahu

              Hi Kaleo,

              Well Antoine's is certianly one of the best in town. My boss, when I worked there, always liked Arnoud's, that was his favorite and he was a native 4th warder. Galatoire's is also a very good and well known place.

              There are a lot of other very good restaurants that are less well known. We used to frequent the restaurants in what's called West End, this is the area near the lake on the west side of NO near the marina, on the way to Southern Yacht Club. Most of this area was wiped out even before Katrina and I haven't been back there since Katrina, so I'd guess none of the ones I liked are still around.

        2. re: mikie

          Hi Mikie,

          Thanks for the heads up. My new bernaise pan is on the way.

          Cheers, D

        3. I am so happy there is finally some truth in advertising. So nice that they displayed the seconds at the top of the page. The middle rivet has obviously never been touched by a 16 oz. ball peen hammer, let alone a multi ton press.

          1. I am a really fan of the saucier pan shape and their 18 cm try piece is tempting, but when I looked at the dimensions, it is just too small if you are a vigorous whisker like I am. I could only stir with a wooden spoon like I do with my tin-lined 1.5 qt one - good for small amount of creme anglaise.