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Broiled Egg Panini

I have a vision of broiled egg panini, made starting with a whole raw egg between bread slices. I'd imagine I could eventually make the timing work so the yolk's not totally solid with lots of experimentation, but I'm wondering if anyone's already managed it and can share guidance?

I understand, fo course, that I could cook or partially cook the egg separately and then add it to toasted bread (and finish from there). It's not what I'm asking about, though.

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  1. Why dont you make a 3-minute egg and put that in the middle before pannini pressing?
    I cant imagine a raw egg heavily pressed between sliced bread without a complete mess.
    Maybe this is possible??

    2 Replies
    1. re: monavano

      The OP specifically stated,

      "I understand, fo course, that I could cook or partially cook the egg separately and then add it to toasted bread (and finish from there). It's not what I'm asking about, though."

      1. re: ttoommyy

        Well good luck to the OP then. Doubtful it works, but perhaps the OP could take one for the team and .... maybe just try making it?

    2. I have a vision of the raw egg oozing out of the sides of the bread as it's being pressed in the panini press/under the weight.

      1. I think you'd have to start by carefully cracking an egg onto a piece of bread and putting it under the broiler until the egg was at least somewhat set, then turning it into a panino by adding the second slice of bread and grilling/pressing. Otherwise you're going to end up with egg white (and yolk) everywhere.

        The only other thing I can think of that would work would be one of those little sandwich/pie makers that are meant for campfire cooking, which essentially seal your ingredients inside of two slices of bread before cooking. Since the edges are closed, you could crack your raw egg in there and seal it between the two pieces of bread, then cook it to your liking (keep the yolk runny or not, etc.).

        http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/45792?...

        3 Replies
        1. re: biondanonima

          Yes, I use my electric jaffle maker (electric version of campfire sandwich maker that you describe) to do exactly that. Place the piece of bread on the bottom, crack an egg into it, sprinkle salt and pepper or any other tasty little extras (chopped bacon, ham, herbs etc), place another slice of bread on top and close and latch the jaffle maker. The edges get crimped together and the egg cooks perfectly. I've never tried timing it to get a slightly oozy yolk, though. Might give it a go. For a different texture or to use less egg, I beat the egg up first and then pour it in.
          Yum, I think I'll go and make one now but with puff pastry instead of bread...

          1. re: Billy33

            I recall doing this as a girl scout back in the dawn of time, with toasted sandwich irons used over a fire. It was a little sandwich-bread sized device with two clamshells, bread and egg and ham/cheese inside and then clamped, held over the fire by a long handle. It crimped the edges of the bread and the egg didn't ooze out that I remember. However, it only pressed the edges, not the middle where the egg was cuddled. A lot of butter was helpful, smeared in the clamshell parts prior to the bread.

            1. re: Teague

              Wow - the visual imagery of this is sublime......my daughter is about to go into scouts. I hope that she will have these same vivid memories.

        2. Take 3 slices of bread, take one of those and cut out a round hole in the middle, stack that one in the center filled with your egg on top of one other slice, broil til some what set, place last slice over, and hope for the best...while pressing...perhaps some cheese as glue to hold slices together and prevent running....OR perhaps just cook the egg in the hollowed out slice turning once before the triple decker with cheese, bacon, etc....then pressing...

          1. Soft boil the egg just so the whites are getting firm then try to use a panini press? Or two pieces of preheated cast iron.

            I like and approve of the idea above to do an egg in a basket in a sandwich.

            1. The center wouldn't get hot enough to cook the egg and you'd have to be careful not to pop the egg. I've made toad in a hole grilled sandwiches in a skillet and even the pressure of a spatula can break the egg yolk if you're not careful. The toad in a hole grilled sandwich cooked the egg only because it was on the skillet. In a panini press, two slices of bread, raw egg, you'd have an oozy mess of raw egg--you wouldn't have to worry about solid egg yolks, though.

              7 Replies
              1. re: chowser

                Toad in the hole was the first thing that came to my mind when I first read the post. Doing something similar might work.

                1. re: mike0989

                  I thought toad in the hole was a Brit dish involving sausages baked in Yorkshire pud batter & served with onion gravy. No eggs involved.

                  1. re: rjbh20

                    I grew up with toad in the hole. In my family's version, you make a whole in a piece of bread, which you then "toast" in a frying pan. When the bread is just getting browned on both sides, you crack an egg into that hole and cook until the egg is cooked to your preference.

                    1. re: smtucker

                      Toad in the Hole is Yorkshire Pudding with sausages cooked in it.
                      My nana called the holey bread/egg concoction a 'One-Eyed Riley'. There are loads of different names for it but it definitely should not be called a Toad in the Hole.

                      1. re: Billy33

                        If you google images, you'll see there are variations.

                        1. re: c oliver

                          Nope, I'm not even going to look - there is only one dish that is called Toad in the Hole and it's not made with bread <grinning cheekily>.

                          1. re: Billy33

                            Billy33.....I think you might be right about that:)

              2. A hot oven might work better than a broiler - sort of using the standard pan-roasting method of starting on the stove and finishing in the oven. That extra heat from the bottom might get the egg cooking faster.

                3 Replies
                1. re: caganer

                  Oh...until I read this, I automatically assumed using a panini maker and thought the broiled part was figurative. Broiled eggs in the oven works well as does baking. The only thing you'd need is a way to hold the egg put, eg tomato or ham slice w/ hole in it. Or Martha Stewart has doubled the bread and cut a hole in the top one to hold the egg. The yolk remains runny. You need the egg to get heat so the panini has to be put together after the egg is cooked.

                  1. re: caganer

                    What is it about the panini press that would add a dimension that you wouldn't get from a broiler? The compression of the bread? The heating of the bread through contact rather than radiation.

                    1. re: GraydonCarter

                      Yes, the panini press compresses the sandwich and crisps the bread in a way that you would not get from a broiler.

                  2. I'm wondering if Jim is wishing he didn't use the word "panini" and just stuck w/ "toasted grilled sandwich" because his request has elicited more pedantic discussion on the word rather than what he is attempting. Although, that also might bring up discussion on what "toasted", "grilled" and "sandwich" really mean and if toasted must mean in a toaster and grilled mean on a grill and if anything done in a toaster can be called toast and what type of bread that must be. And let's not even get into what the plural of toast is.:-p

                    8 Replies
                    1. re: chowser

                      I think his choice of words is very important, because if he truly wants to make "panini" in the US sense of the word (since in Italy, all panini are not necessarily pressed/warmed), then he wants to press it which brings up a huge problem with the raw egg, which in turn is the reason he posted in the first place.

                      1. re: ttoommyy

                        I mean panini, hence my use of the term, and you're correct about the problem I was hoping to creatively solve.

                        1. re: Jim Leff

                          I don't know how you can put a raw egg between two pieces of bread and press even lightly with your hand much less a grill and not have a freaking mess. And I'd love to know WHY you want to do something like that. What's the end result you're looking for?

                          1. re: c oliver

                            It seems pretty obvious to me what the problem is here, and I can't even imagine why you WOULDN'T want to figure it out. I'm craving a sandwich with a crispy grilled exterior and a smooth luscious slightly runny egg yolk interior just thinking about it.

                            I don't know the answer, but I like the idea of doing it with 3 pieces of bread, with a hole cut in the middle piece for the egg. The bulk of that extra piece of bread might just cushion the yolk enough to keep it from bursting The problem is, then you'd end up with the wrong bread-to-egg yolk ratio, and the inner piece of bread would end up mushy from the soaked egg white and no contact with the panini press. So that's probably not a solution either.

                            I have a grill that opens flat, and has a loose "hinge" that adjusts height depending on what's in there. So maybe I'd start out with the grill open and hot, and place a piece of buttered bread on each side, so it starts to get grilled and crispy. Then I'd crack an egg on one side, and try covering that side with a pot lid (not touching the bread or egg) to keep the heat in and help the top of the egg set. Once the egg starts to look done, I'd take the piece of bread from the other side, gently place it on top of the egg, and gently close the press. I might even experiment using metal measuring cups on the grill on either side of the sandwich, to keep it from pressing down hard enough to break the yolk, but still just enough to press in the grill marks.

                            If that didn't work, I might try the same technique, using really thick pieces of bread, and hollowing out a little nest for the egg (being careful not to break through the other side of the bread.)

                            I hope you can find an answer and contribute to the betterment of sandwichkind.

                            1. re: Chris VR

                              The only way I see the end result being anything acceptable would be to "paninify" (that's the verb we use) the bread, fry the egg and then put them together. Get the desired result in a way that will work.

                        2. re: ttoommyy

                          He also used the word "broiled" and if he meant panini pressed then you don't broil. Does he want pressed, or broiled? It's not clear. I think he'd have better luck frying it on the sidewalk than on a panini press between two slices of bread.

                          1. re: chowser

                            it's broiled, not pressed or fried, so as not to have any clean up afterward. and the yolk wanted runny or semi-runny. a feat most akin to ordering scrambled eggs with french fries in a diner...

                            1. re: Gastronomos

                              But it's not broiled if it's done in a panini press. You'd have to use the broiler for that. What does he want, panini press or broiler?

                              http://www.cookthink.com/reference/91...

                              At least scrambled eggs and french fries are a possibility (breakfast special #1, lunch special #4, hold the burger, bacon and toast). Putting an egg between two pieces of bread into a panini press won't get you anything but a mess and a half hour clean up which we know thanks to pikawica.

                      2. Curiosity got the better of my good judgement and I just gave this a try. Not a success. I used my waffle maker, as it's lighter weight than a panini press. Preheated it, then brushed with melted butter. while iron was heating, broke a very fresh egg into a small bowl and seasoned with S&P. Put a piece of bread in the iron. Poured the egg on top and it slid off the bread and into the iron faster than I can blink.

                        Took a photo, but have no idea how to upload it.

                        14 Replies
                        1. re: pikawicca

                          LOL. I didn't think about the slippery factor :)

                              1. re: Chris VR

                                Not quite that bad, but still a big mess.

                            1. re: pikawicca

                              This is what I referred to above as an "oozy mess of raw egg." Even if he placed it in something that would hold the egg, eg., a slice of hollowed tomato, between two slices of bread, it wouldn't get hot enough to cook the egg. The bread would be burnt way before the egg cooked.

                              1. re: chowser

                                Just don't go here; you'll end up with with a 30-minute clean-up.

                                1. re: pikawicca

                                  Thanks for the warning. I'll stick w/ my toad in a hole. My panini press doesn't come apart so it's a pain to clean when it's not a huge mess.

                                  1. re: chowser

                                    I **hate** cleaning my Panini press!

                                    And speaking of that slippery/oozing problem, I always manage to forget to level mine when I'm cooking something that could "run." It can either be level or on an angle to drain off fat/grease. I can't tell you the number of times something good has drained out instead!

                                    1. re: jbsiegel

                                      What do you put in your sandwich that oozes all the way off the grill? We have little bits of cheese sometime come out around the edge of the sandwich but that's all. And if we're careful and don't take the cheese all the way to the edge of the bread, then we don't even have that.

                                      1. re: c oliver

                                        I think I just overstuff! I also tend to put mayo on the outside of the bread before grilling. If I end up with too much of that, it'll ooze out too (particularly if I have a lot of sandwiches on the press at once).

                                        And we just won't talk about the time that I tried to make chocolate chip cookies on it!

                                        1. re: jbsiegel

                                          The chocolate chip cookie thing should be the start of a board called "The Most Ridiculous Thing I Ever Attempted to Cook and Failed At" :)

                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            Chocolate chip cookie dough works great in a panini press. Crispy outside, chewy inside. The key is to start w/ cold dough and keep the panini press flat. Two minutes to a delicious hot pressed cookie. I used to say I wanted to start a panini press dessert shop w/ things like that.

                                            1. re: c oliver

                                              Ha ha! I actually read somewhere about trying it!

                                              How about "The Most Ridiculous Thing I Ever Attempted to Cook and Succeeded At"? My answer: Candy Corn Pudding - the kids were in heaven!

                                              1. re: jbsiegel

                                                This is really hilarious! Who'd a thunk?

                              2. I wonder if you could start with dough, instead of already baked bread. Lay out thinly-rolled foccacia or pizza dough into a pan with a shallow shape - like one of those muffin top baking pans, add the egg, and carefully crimp the edges. Maybe prick the top crust before covering the egg to let steam out? Bake in a hot hot oven to get a nice crust? Or quickly fry the baked sandwich in a cast iron skillet with lots of butter to get buttery, crispy crust?

                                Guess that would be more of an egg pie than panini though. I was thinking of this recipe for corneal muffins with eggs baked in the middle (which are delicious BTW) and how to tweak that idea to get to an egg panini: http://aeriskitchen.com/2012/03/egg-b...

                                1. I spent some time trying to figure out something like this sandwich - I have a flying saucer sandwich maker - (if you haven't heard of these and you like toasted sandwiches - get one - they make amazing sandwiches) however, the runny egg in the center just doesn't work - I tried it w raw egg any number of ways, including with cheese and ham to protect the bread, and try to keep the egg from running out - it went everywhere and didn't actually cook through at all (runny whites are gross) - I ended up using very softly scrambled eggs, they cooked more but still had some creaminess. Great sandwich, but not what I had envisioned, which sounds similar to what you are looking for.... so, my long winded answer is that I don't think you can do it!

                                  2 Replies
                                    1. re: GraydonCarter

                                      awesome - mime always blew up - I was on a commercial stove - so may have had it too hot.

                                      And may I just add that Toastite sandwiches seem to make chemically enhanced sandwiches - everything tastes so much better in them (crack like)..... my dad used to make applesauce sandwiches that tasted so amazing! Everyone in my family has one now - Must be a Toastite -preferably an old one!

                                  1. Ensconce the egg between two slices of cold cheese and then two slices of very cold tomato. Maybe take out the center of the lower tomato and make a bowl with the cheese for the yolk. You aren't trying to smash the sandwich, as many do, but toast on each side. By the time the tomatoes get hot and the cheese starts melting, the egg can begin cooking.

                                    4 Replies
                                      1. re: c oliver

                                        Yeah, what the hell! You can smash it more when the egg is cooked to distribute the yolk. I'dd suggest having 2.3 beers before trying this. Scrape up any browned excursions and put them back on the sandwich when done. I'm not seeing the problem here.

                                        1. re: rudeboy

                                          Oh, I agree with you but OP doesn't want something toasted. He wants a "panini" (sic). :)

                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            Good point. That's why I'd smash it at the end. Voila - panino. But if the wife is there, panini. We all read the lame wikipedia article.

                                    1. OK Jim Leff - what the hell did you do?!?!

                                      13 Replies
                                      1. re: rudeboy

                                        Still pondering. The only solution above that fits my needs would be toad in the hole, but that's not really what I'm visualizing.

                                        Perhaps my only course would be to start the Panini with all ingredients except the egg, while simultaneously frying egg in skillet, stopping when it's the least bit set, and then adding it to the Panini and proceeding with toasting. It'll remain to be seen whether I can accomplish this while keeping the yoke reasonably soft, and how hard it would be to wedge the bread slices apart once they've started in the panini maker.

                                        Btw, just to annoy the bejesus out of the foreign grammar weenies: panini panini panini panini panini.

                                        I'm also mentally toying with the idea of creating a round frame, placing it atop one of the bread slices, dropping raw egg into that, and proceeding with toasting. Question is height of frame--whether it can be high enough not to leak egg under pressure, yet low enough not to interfere too much with sandwich compaction. If the frame was made out of something edible, I wouldn't have to worry about removal. Unlike toad in the hole, this route wouldn't create an excess bread situation.

                                        1. re: Jim Leff

                                          "Btw, just to annoy the bejesus out of the foreign grammar weenies: panini panini panini panini panini."

                                          HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!

                                          1. re: Jim Leff

                                            Jim, you are wimping out on this issue. As I said, have a couple of beers and just go for it. Make it an epic night. Make your panino, and kiss your wife while you are making panini.

                                            1. re: Jim Leff

                                              You know, I think there'd be a market for a shapeable, expandable frame to surround the bread when toasting panini to keep liquid ingredients from seeping out.

                                              I know about those two handled gizmos where the two sides lock together, cutting off excess bread, and surrounding the entirety. But I'm imagining a more flexible solution.

                                                1. re: Gastronomos

                                                  Cool. So you can put a raw egg in between the bread?

                                                  1. re: c oliver

                                                    sure. it's a cheap contraption too. so the investment wont break the bank. it's good for grilled cheese, and I add other stuff to it as well. ham and cheese, etc...

                                                    1. re: Gastronomos

                                                      Well, it looks like this will solve OP's 'problem.'

                                              1. re: Jim Leff

                                                I was thinking it might work to crack an egg onto a piece of bread on a hot panini press. Cover w/ frying pan to start cooking the egg. Remove pan when whites are set, top w/ bread. Gently press so top bread is cooked. If the egg oozes, use a slice of tomato, center removed, to hold it in place while toasting w/ top bread, then remove if you don't want tomato.

                                                1. re: chowser

                                                  This will most certainly NOT work., as I posted above.

                                                  1. re: chowser

                                                    I just gave it a try. No tomatoes so I used a very thick slice of onion ring. Heated up the press, put on a piece of bread, the onion and then the egg gently in the center of the onion. Some egg white leakage but it stayed. If I had pressed the onion slightly into the bread, there would be no leakage. I covered the top w/ the pan turned upside down (like diners cook cheese onto burgers), covered for five minutes, Nothing--useless idea. I removed the pan, slowly lowered the panini press top propped w/ a wooden spoon so the press didn't touch the egg but was very close to it, like a broiler. When the whites were just barely cooked, I topped w/ second piece of bread and gently closed the press and let it sit until the top piece of bread was toasted. After removing, I took out the onion. Cooked whites (thin, though), runny yolk. So, it worked. Not worth the hassle but it works.

                                                  2. re: Jim Leff

                                                    So for nothing more than the simple notion that there is a solution to all things delicious, I fucked with this concept. I got a solid result - albeit, with a certain amount of ass pain.

                                                    I started with a loaf of Italian bread that I got from a local baker near the end of the day. I sliced two, pretty thick pieces, on the bias. In one of them I "dug" a "hollow", about halfway through the slice, leaving close to a half inch, around the edges, unscooped. Both pieces of bread went under a low broiler for a minute or so - just to develop some crispness before browning.

                                                    A raw egg was placed into the "gut hollow" and that piece went back under the broiler for another minute or so to permit it to basically set some. I covered that with a round of liverwurst* of similar size to the egg, a few shards of sweet onion slices, and some Swiss cheese. It was topped with the other slice of bread, which I had gently slathered with Mayo, and finished in my twenty-year old, cheap, panini** press thingy.

                                                    It was good, real good. Though, admittedly, the first time I tried it without the initial broiler toasting, it was a mess.

                                                    *It may be your question, but it was my time, so why not double down on the experiments, no?

                                                    **I say, "panini"
                                                    You say, "panini"
                                                    Somebody says, "panino"
                                                    Everybody howls, "Hey you kids get off my lawn!"

                                                    I've been makin' this point for too long now for it to be worth elaborating upon anymore.

                                                2. I gave this one more try. Without getting into a debate on the panini/o or bread type, I used naan (I'll omit bread so not to drive the pedantics crazy). Naan on hot panini press, two slices of cheese w/ holes cut out, raw onion ring in each hole. Cracked egg into each hole, seasoned. Lowered top pf press close to eggs, propped open w/ wooden spoon for 5 minutes. Topped egg w/ cheese then w/ naan, gently closed press. Sit for a minute. Perfectly broiled egg panini. I tried to post a picture but it's not working.

                                                  8 Replies
                                                    1. re: c oliver

                                                      LOL, now I'm on a roll since I broke out the panini press. I'm going to try this w/ ciabatta next, center scooped out to hold the egg.

                                                    2. re: chowser

                                                      Sounds great! Consider posting photos to http://imgur.com/and linking thereto. It's free, anon, and easy. No need to create an account.

                                                      Bet the scooped ciabatta rocks....

                                                      1. re: Jim Leff

                                                        Okay, let's try this.

                                                        http://i.imgur.com/xtdqsUZ.jpg

                                                        The egg yolk showing isn't as runny as the other, which leaked all over them plate, in a good way.

                                                        Tonight's dinner is going to be patty melt panini w/ egg. I'll cook the patty first, add to scooped out ciabatta, top w/ egg and continue as above.

                                                        1. re: chowser

                                                          Posting to CH, esp. with the new enlargement feature, will be a lot better IMO.

                                                          1. re: c oliver

                                                            I tried repeatedly and had problems uploading from my phone. It might be that my phone is so old but it didn't work.

                                                          2. re: chowser

                                                            Great photo! You're doing important work!

                                                            1. re: Jim Leff

                                                              Tried the panini ciabatta idea. The key to making it work is minimal pressure on it once the lid is shut. Some yolks broke, which is fine but no runny yolks. I think it needs to be propped w/ a wooden spoon the same thickness as the sandwich, or to hold it manually so it gets pressed but not too much. It was a good easy dinner. I did a vegetarian option on onion roll w/ roasted cauliflower, egg and cheese w/ scooped out the center. That was excellent.