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Gourmet chicken fried steak?

ipsedixit Feb 14, 2014 04:11 PM

Does anyone in LA make chicken fried steak with either high-end ingredients or unusual cuts of meat, or both?

For example, a place in Dallas makes chicken fried steak with bison ribeye (i.e., "chicken fried buffalo steak").

Anything of that ilk in these parts?

  1. s
    sal_acid Feb 15, 2014 07:12 PM

    I do see your point. Too often food like this is made with crap meat (which is one of my misgivings about Mexican food). CFS would be better if not tough.

    1. Will Owen Feb 15, 2014 05:00 PM

      I can see that flying in Dallas, but just trying to find a truly decent everyday one here is kind of a chore. The typical problem here is that somebody DID try to gussie it up and got too fancy with the gravy or the potatoes. About the best I can think of is at Harry's, on San Fernando just north of Burbank Blvd, but you need to get it as a breakfast plate, with eggs and hashbrowns. The dinner version comes with the worst mashed potatoes I've ever tried to eat – avoid at all costs!

      I think it'd be nice if someone made a version with pork steak … maybe I have a new project.

      1. s
        susiequeue Feb 15, 2014 03:17 PM

        "Gourmet chicken fried steak" -- isn't that an oxymoron? Isn't the whole point that's it's a guilty indulgence, like Mexican food cooked in lard. Or watching a Real Housewife show.

        I'd personally like to know where a good chicken fried steak is! (Koreatown's Taylor's used to have one; not sure if they still do. The La Canada branch does not.)

        Ahh, the sheer, blissful joy of eating fried, fatty, thoroughly bad-for-you food! Oops, I mean kale.

        1. w
          Worldwide Diner Feb 14, 2014 07:32 PM

          Think it'll taste any different after breading, frying, and then smothered in gravy?

          3 Replies
          1. re: Worldwide Diner
            ipsedixit Feb 14, 2014 08:01 PM

            It did with the bison meat.

            1. re: ipsedixit
              c
              cfylong Feb 15, 2014 07:08 PM

              It may not be the meat so much as the technique used to bring out the flavor of the bison. Someone in Dallas must have taken the time to perfect some chicken frying details and kitchen equipment to do that. Might be interesting to see what they can do with a chicken fried filet or ribeye.

              1. re: cfylong
                ipsedixit Feb 15, 2014 07:48 PM

                It's sort of like hamburger.

                It's all ground meat, but there is not an significicant differene between a burger made with a choice cut of wet-aged chuck versus one made with prime, dry-aged sirloin.

                And you can still discern a difference even when one decides to drown the burger in all sorts of accouterments like lettuce, onions (raw or caramelized), bacon, tomato, pickles, cheese, sauces this and condiments that, etc.

          2. barryc Feb 14, 2014 06:47 PM

            there probably is, though i personally don't see the point; the point of the technique is to make a cheaper less tender cut more palatable.

            it would be like making a kobe beef meat loaf (for the folks who don't get it - why take a piece of meat with incredible marbling and grind it up? you could probably create an equally tasty rendition for a lot less money by taking a cheaper cut and adding a little pork fat to the mix.).

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