HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Discussion

Several Questions About Woks on Electric Coil Stoves

There have been some great discussions on here regarding this topic, but something confuses me:

I bought a Williams-Sonoma hand-hammered carbon steel wok (that has been reviewed on this site) to use on my apartment's electric coil range. It is flat bottomed.

Many places state that these electrics don't get as hot as what is required to properly stir fry in a wok. Because of this, after seasoning the wok, I popped it on the coil and turned it on to 'HI'. Essentially as hot as it goes. I tested a tiny drop of peanut oil on the wok, and once it hit center it promptly ignited.

So I'm confused - how can this wok possibly need to get hotter if the oil already catches fire in it? I can't even add food to it on HI without scaring the neighbors.

On that note, I also bought the Lodge cast iron wok because once heated, it retains heat (supposedly well due to its density) which will allow me to add food to it without a sharp drop in temp.

The temp drop is what I experienced with the WS wok when I turned it down to use. It resulted in less charring and more boiling/steaming.

Are either of these woks going to work for me on my electric coil stove? And what do i do regarding the high heat needs of stir=fry versus the tendency of the peanut oil to burst into flames?

 
  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. <Many places state that these electrics don't get as hot as what is required to properly stir fry in a wok.>

    A lot of time people have misspoken. Most electric stoves can get an empty wok pretty hot, it is that they do not have enough power to keep the wok hot after the foods are tossed in. Once you tossed the foods in, the wok will very quickly cool down. The stoves, at this point, need to quickly supply the energy to heat the wok back up.

    < I tested a tiny drop of peanut oil on the wok, and once it hit center it promptly ignited.>

    Is your wok clean? Obviously, a very hot wok can ignite the oil. However, a wok full full debris and curds will do so easier.

    <how can this wok possibly need to get hotter if the oil already catches fire in it?>

    After you toss in your food, then you will find out if your stoves have enough power to sufficiently stir fry your foods.

    <it retains heat (supposedly well due to its density) which will allow me to add food to it without a sharp drop in temp.>

    Ah, same thing just mentioned earlier.

    <It resulted in less charring and more boiling/steaming.>

    If you have a more powerful stove, then you won't get boiling and steaming.

    <Are wither of these woks going to work for me on my electric coil stove?>

    The cast iron wok will give you sufficient heat capacity to partially overcome the weaker stoves. However, you will very unlikely able to toss foods in a heavy wok like it. The WS wok is a bit too thin. I have it. It works, but, objectively speaking, it is probably not the best wok I have.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

      Thank you very much for your reply. I thought that my WS wok was clean when the oil ignited but perhaps I missed something.

      1. re: J_Tay81

        Maybe not. Maybe you really have the wok really hot (way pass the flash point).

        Following DuffH's comment, yes, you should not turn down the stove power after you add the food keep the stove output high and try to maintain the hot temperature. In fact, that is the most important time to increase heat not decrease heat.

    2. <The temp drop is what I experienced with the WS wok when I turned it down to use. It resulted in less charring and more boiling/steaming.>

      You turned down the heat. Why not run the WS wok at high heat, but add the oil before it reaches flashpoint? That way you might have enough heat being poured into the pan to allow it to recover more quickly than at the lower setting, preventing food from boiling.

      4 Replies
      1. re: DuffyH

        DuffyH,

        If I follow yourreply correctly, then I should put the empty wok on the burner set to HI, but add the oil prior to the wok fulling coming up to temp? Would that avoid the small fireball I created in my kitchen the other night?

        1. re: J_Tay81

          <but add the oil prior to the wok fulling coming up to temp?>

          I don't know exactly what you mean, but you don't want to add the oil from the beginning. You want to add the oil after the cookware has been heated. Add the oil right before you add the food.

          1. re: J_Tay81

            <add the oil prior to the wok fulling coming up to temp>

            It sounds like your wok was OVERheated before you added the oil.

            Heat the pan, add oil, then food. The pan should be very hot, but not so hot it makes your oil catch fire.

            1. re: DuffyH

              I lightly toss my stir fry ingredients in the lightest coating of peanut oil before throwing them into a carbon steel wok that has been heating empty on hi for 5 min. Exhaust fan on, kitchen door open they hit the dull red carbon steel wool bottom, dance around the wok a bit and stay crispy while getting that singe I find really pleasing. The actually time in the pan is almost always under a minute... Veggies work best diced in fairly small uniform pieces & meat I've either velveted and blanched or smoked.

              I believe this would be in keeping with the "bao" style of stir frying - ingredients added rapidly with no break and constantly stirred.

        2. Recovery time is what is the problem with an electric cooktop. In my opinion you cannot get a wok too hot. If you had oil ignite then try adding the oil to the food you are cooking prior to putting it in the pan. I have a cast iron wok and I preheat it in my oven to 550 degrees for an hour before cooking. I've never had oil ignite before even at that temperature.

          4 Replies
          1. re: ranger99

            I don't expect you would, but I'm curious why not simply heat the pan on the burner... It would get hotter sooner anyway. Consider how the seasoning in a skillet would burn off if left and as far as I understand that occurring at around 700°F.

            1. re: CaliforniaJoseph

              I have a ceramic cooktop and it will would take longer than an hour to heat the whole cast iron wok up to 550 degrees. It's hard enough even with a heavy cast iron wok to keep it hot enough on the stovetop.

              1. re: ranger99

                Have you considered getting a single induction burner for this purpose? I saw one at Costco that I'm seeing good reviews on... For $59 I'm thinking I'll take the leap myself.

                1. re: CaliforniaJoseph

                  Mine works really well if I preheat it in the oven. Not sold on the induction burners - not all of them work as well as others in my experience.

          2. I got so frustrated trying to use my 40 year-old wok on my smooth surface electric cooktop, that I bought a single-burner butane stove for around $20 and that little gem gets blazing hot and holds the heat level, unlike the electric stove element that turns itself on and off. I set the little burner on top of my stove and use the exhaust fan for safety purposes, and also because I am stir-frying. The butane stoves are available online or in Asian market stores, and the canned butane refills are quite inexpensive, too.