HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

Pizza Traditionalist.......No More.

If someone told me 10 years ago of the wonderfulness of using Brussels sprouts for a pizza topping, I wouldn't even consider it. Sausage, pepperoni, mushrooms, pepper and onion, perhaps ground beef....these were the toppings I grew up with. I think anchovies are a bad idea, but at least they seem to be "traditional". Anyway, last night I made this Brussels sprouts, bacon, onion, and mozz white pie. It was fantastic! Highly recommended! Who knows, I might even try a Hawaiian next.

 
  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. bitter greens on pies is pretty standard, like broccoli rabe or arugula. your pie sounds great!

      1. That looks and sounds delicious! I wish my husband would eat Brussels sprouts. I love them roasted with bacon and walnuts.

        My favorite nontraditional pizza is butternut squash, caramelized onions and goat cheese. (with some fresh herbs)

        1. I love Brussels sprouts on pizza - my DH was skeptical the first time I did it, but fell in love instantly. They're our favorite vegetable - why WOULDN'T they be good on pizza??? :)

          1. Sometimes when I make homemade pizza, I do a "garbage" pie... everything but the kitchen sink. THIN sliced onions/peppers, black olives (NOT outta a can), left-over veggies,,, plenty of cheese.

            7 Replies
            1. re: kseiverd

              So where do your black olives come from, a jar? Your own olive tree?

              1. re: Dirtywextraolives

                If @kseiverd is like me, the olives come from either an Italian deli or a market that has olives of all kinds that you buy by weight. At least that's what I got from the statement "(NOT outta a can)."

                1. re: ttoommyy

                  Oh you mean like an olive bar? We have one of those in one of my local upscale markets. They cost close to $20 a lb. and trust me, those come out of large industrial sized jars ;)

                  1. re: Dirtywextraolives

                    That's true, but there's a difference between being stored in water, brine or oil...

                    1. re: fourunder

                      Absolutely. Most varieties of olives are not canned, except for the ubiquitous mild pitted black olives from CA.

                      1. re: Dirtywextraolives

                        yeah those olive bar olives have nothing to do with those tasteless black olives in a can.

                    2. re: Dirtywextraolives

                      Well, everything has to be packed in something before transport and distribution. But the ones I buy locally at my local Italian deli are much better than the ones in a a jar or can from the supermarket shelf.