HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

Cream of Spinach from Almontaser (sic) or Yemen style

  • 10
  • Share

I loved this restaurant in the Cobble Hill area, Brooklyn for many years. It's been closed since the 90's but I still crave their creamed spinach. It was a Yemen restaurant. I plead ignorance to the proper conjugation to turn it into a word to describe the people of Yemen descent (-i, -ese, -ian, etc).

It's more than just a bit of lemon and some nutmeg/cumin. Anyone with experience with Yemen food or this restaurant, your input is greatly appreciated.

TIA

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. I don't know this dish but the term is Yemeni.

    1. Hey that was my grandfathers restaurant he actually passed on that delicious recipe to us, he still makes the same food he made in the restaurant occasionally when we ask for it. It's awesome how that restaurant made such a landmark in Cobble hill

      8 Replies
      1. re: Abbyalmontaser

        wait! you can't leave the creamed spinach fans hanging like that...... PLEASE share the recipe!

        i'm always looking for more ways to enjoy creamed spinach: when i was in college, we lived on creamed spinach, white rice and yogurt - they seemed to be the only safe items in the cafeteria!

        1. re: rmarisco

          Wow I'm honored! It's actually quite simple it's only fresh garlic cloves, salt, butter and heavy cream and to make it's thick texture we mix all purpose flour in the heavy cream to create the thick texture. So the first step it to boil spinach in water then drain, then put the spinach in a pot and pour the heavy cream(all purpose flour should be in it already) over the spinach and allow it to come to a light boil then add half a stick of butter and salt to taste( I prefer a lot of salt and Grandpa doesn't :p) then add the garlic cloves if you prefer to throw them in whole or mashed it's how you like it, we prefer to mash it so we aren't biting into a whole clove of garlic. And there it is, bring it to a boil and enjoy!! Thanks so much my Grandfather will appreciate the wonderful feedback from everyone.

          1. re: Abbyalmontaser

            Thank you for posting this recipe. The dish had a yellow tint and a very distinct flavor profile, do you happen to know if there was any variations to the dish? I've experimented with curry, turmeric and annato to try to replicate the coloring but the flavor is never quite right.

            Thanks again for posting.

            1. re: ncghettogourmet

              No problem I was glad I could help!! The butter made it more yellowish he didn't put anything else in to change the color but the butter I believe is what the yellow tint is. And again you are very welcome he will be very happy to know people still remember his cooking!!

            2. re: Abbyalmontaser

              Butter, flour, heavy cream?

              It doesn't sound very Yemeni to me.

              It still does sound delicious, but I'm wondering if the butter/flour/cream were used in lieu of harder to obtain original Yemeni ingredients?

              1. re: Roland Parker

                It was one of the more simple sides there are many Yemeni dishes that include a variety of spices but are used more for entrees and bigger dishes, he liked to keep the spinach a little more simple and creamier without those Arabic spices

          2. re: Abbyalmontaser

            We ate there weekly for quite some time. If you are not able to give the recipe can you give an idea of the spices (not measurements) to get me a bit closer?

            1. re: Abbyalmontaser

              Oh yes, please share the recipe or at least an idea of ingredients!