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Food Heroes

sandiasingh Dec 28, 2013 08:59 AM

While Michael Pollan is definitely one of my top food heroes, I find this list to be a little bit incredible and am curious how it came about. Walmart's food buyer? Really?

In addition to Pollan, my food heroes are Robyn O'Brien, a tireless activist on the issue of GMO's and additives in children's foods; Wenonah Hauter, a committed and accomplished real food lobbyist and founder of Food and Water Watch and author of "Foodopoly," a brilliant book; and Jamie Oliver for his work for improved school lunches. Second line heroes are Tyler Florence for his dedication to informing parents about organic, home-made babyfood and how easy and healthful it is for the little ones, and the Food Babe for her appeal to young people and her savvy marketing skills--she has made a real difference in getting the word out about the importance of food and health.

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/fgmi45...

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  1. ttoommyy RE: sandiasingh Dec 30, 2013 03:51 AM

    The article you reference uses "most powereful" in its title while you are using "hero." There's a big difference there. The guy from Walmart makes this list because of the volume of food he purchases; therefore he really does wield a lot of power in his field.

    2 Replies
    1. re: ttoommyy
      sandiasingh RE: ttoommyy Dec 30, 2013 07:39 AM

      I understand that and am sure he is not one of Michael Pollan's "heroes" either. Regardless, the powerful food buyer of Walmart will never wield any power over me, nor receive my respect. Nor do I think he will make any major impression on Walmart food buyers. It's a marketing game.

      This link popped up on Pollan's page as I was about to post my food hero list and that's why I included it here. Activists such as those I posted above have much more power over influencing peoples' perspectives than Michele Obama or most of those listed among the "most powerful." While it's a nice thing they have done with the White House garden, it has very little influence over most peoples' eating habits. Again, it's a marketing game.

      1. re: sandiasingh
        ttoommyy RE: sandiasingh Dec 31, 2013 09:14 AM

        "Regardless, the powerful food buyer of Walmart will never wield any power over me, nor receive my respect. Nor do I think he will make any major impression on Walmart food buyers. It's a marketing game."

        He certainly wields power over America's farmers who are struggling to make money these days. Like it or not, this man, among all the people cited, probably has the most power of all.

    2. b
      beevod RE: sandiasingh Dec 30, 2013 08:02 AM

      Heroes risk their lives. These people merely risk their jobs and, or, reputations.

      1. h
        HillJ RE: sandiasingh Dec 30, 2013 12:45 PM

        These are folks doing their job; some self titled. Folks interested in being a part of the greater good in food source circles. Mavericks in some areas and whistle blowers in others. I don't know about food hero but they are certainly on the fairly short list of "give a damn."

        1. i
          INDIANRIVERFL RE: sandiasingh Dec 31, 2013 09:19 AM

          Hero has become one of the most overrated terms used in the USA.

          A Medal of Honor awardee from Viet Nam that I knew was never treated like a hero upon his return. He was gold in the Army.

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