HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

What Are You Planning For New Years Day?

For the New Year's Day meal, we always plan to include some type of pork product, something green and black eye peas for prosperity, luck and money. Last year I made braised pigs feet, a pot of mixed winter greens (kale, mustards, turnip greens cooked WITH corned pigs tails) and a pot of simmered dried black eyed peas, served in bowls with their juices.

This year, I'm away visiting my daughter and her boyfriend; she doesn't eat much pork with the exception of ribs and a pork chop, and she will eat pork BBQ when she can get it. He loves pork so I'm thinking this year, I'll put a pork shoulder on the grill and make pulled pork BBQ. For the sides, maybe spinach cooked with garlic and olive oil and fried okra for the daughter. Black eyed pea salad and hushpuppies.

What do you have planned for your New Year's Day meal (or New Year's Eve, if that's your day) ?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. I will have a big pot of french onion soup simmering on the back of the stove, some homemade baguettes and shredded gruyere for topping the soup. I'll also make some kind of light/fresh salad, most likely with endive and fennel.

    Not sure what I am going to make for NYE, entertaining the idea of a meet and a cheese fondue since we didn't do it xmas eve,

    4 Replies
    1. re: foodieX2

      I think you just helped me decide what to do with the beef broth that I am making from the leftover prime rib bones and roasted short ribs . Thanks for the inspiration! A nice salad, homemade bread..

        1. re: foodieX2

          Well the week got away from me so no soup today. Instead I decided to head to WF to get some kind meat to roast, leaning towards lamb or a rib eye roast but the place was packed! Ended up with some wild salmon which I'll serve on a bed of spicy sautéed leeks and spinach.

          Happy New Year everyone!

        2. My New Year's Day menu is written in blood... ;) Made the same thing for years.... Hoppin' John, collards with ham hocks (but not overcooked), and corn bread. The only thing that varies is dessert. Still haven't decided on that one yet.

          2 Replies
          1. re: ChefJune

            Mostly the same here. I've never developed a taste for collard greens, but the Hoppin' John (simmered with the ham hock that's been in the freezer since we finished the Thanksgiving ham) and cornbread are standards here, too. I'll probably make a pork chop for my husband, who can't sit down to a dinner without a big hunk of meat on his plate--but the Hoppin' John and cornbread are all I need!

            1. re: MsMaryMc

              I need collards with my BEPs and rice. The rest is 'gravy; :)

          2. Black eyed peas cooked with ham hocks (I like the smoky flavor it gives without having to bite into any pork pieces,) and greens (kale and chard from the garden,) for sure. I'm still undecided on the meat.

            I was thinkin' ahead and bought the dried B.E.P. and ham hocks when I did my Christmas grocery shopping, they can be VERY hard to find around here the weekend between the two holidays.

              1. re: Kelli2006

                This was our traditional New Year's meal, growing up. For over 30 years, I've tried to convince Mr P that pork and 'kraut are delicious together. This year, I give up. He wants steak.

              2. I'm going to do a slow cooker Bolognese with my new slow cooker. I also plan on making fresh pasta... haven't decided what kind yet, maybe tagliatelle. Haven't really decided on the rest yet... maybe garlic bread?

                77 Replies
                  1. re: juliejulez

                    How does one do a Bolognese in a slow cooker? Color me confused ::)

                      1. re: MamasCooking

                        http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/mem...

                        Please read this recipe, which is the one I do, and tell me how it can be done in a slow cooker. And, if not this recipe, then please link to a recipe for Bolognese sauce that CAN be done in one. Thanks.

                        1. re: c oliver

                          I think you are obviously capable of Googling slow cooker Bolognese yourself. As far as reading the recipe you linked to I might look at it if I have time but not a high priority:) Thanks for taking all of that time to respond and post it though.

                          1. re: MamasCooking

                            Okay. So please give me YOUR recipe for slow cooker Bolognese. There are many steps to a Bolognese recipe and I don't think those steps are compatible with a slow cooker. But I'm completely open to learning what you do.

                            1. re: c oliver

                              I rarely consume beef. Maybe four times a year. I don't prepare those rich heavy types of sauces/meals for myself and it is not something I would order if dining out. Go ahead and Google Slowcooker Bolognese sauces. I did:)

                              1. re: MamasCooking

                                I did Google one and it kinda answered my question. It's actually assembled on the stovetop and then transferred to the slow cooker. And the recipe I did look at sounded pretty marginal. No wine, high heat, etc. I make a 5X batch a couple of times a year and freeze in portions. Since you don't make it, you may not realize what a good one really tastes like.

                                1. re: c oliver

                                  But since you don't make the crockpot one, you also may not realize how good it might be. Try it first and give us a report, comparing the two.

                                  1. re: coll

                                    coll, with all due respect, I'm sticking with the Hazan version. I actually use my slow cooker for very little 'real' cooking as I find it not sensitive enough. But that doesn't mean that it can't be good. I just plan on spending the day at home (which I do anyway being retired and having lots of free time) a couple of times a year.

                                    1. re: c oliver

                                      Of course you should stick with one you like. Just that I have yet to find Bolognese that blows me away. Not that I'm searching frantically.

                                      I don't do much cooking with my crockpot but won't discount it until I try it.

                                  2. re: c oliver

                                    I have had it at a friend's house quite a few years ago when I was younger and could consume luxurious rich foods. It was superb and addicting.

                            2. re: c oliver

                              So funny, because I just used my mom's slow cooker to finish off this very recipe.

                              I'm visiting, and I bought all the ingredients needed to make a big batch, and freeze some for her to use later. Started on the stove, but knew that her cast iron chicken fryer was not big enough, so I used the slow cooker after browning meat and adding milk. It worked a charm.

                              She has a good slow-cooker, though. Might not work with all slow cookers.

                              By the way, the method of starting a dish on the stovetop and then completing it in the crockpot must be pretty common -- I do it with most meat dishes.

                              1. re: DebinIndiana

                                When I first mentioned this, I thought people were cooking the whole thing in the SC. I wouldn't be able to do even the final cooking as mine won't cook slow enough to accomplish this: "turn heat down so that sauce cooks at the laziest of simmers, with just an intermittent bubble breaking through the surface.'

                          2. re: c oliver

                            This is the recipe I'm planning on trying out http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/recip... The reviews look pretty good.

                            It does require some "pre-assembly" work on the stove, but that's OK since I'm home all day. The slow cooker I received for Christmas has a metal insert for using on the stovetop to brown meat etc, so I could theoretically do all the stove work in that and then pop into the cooker to simmer all day. I don't really see how it's much different than using the stovetop.

                            1. re: juliejulez

                              i am sure it will be delicious julie!

                            1. re: juliejulez

                              Julie,

                              Please try your Bolognese recipe and report back. I know Cook's Illustrated has a version.

                              I use my slow cooker every Sunday during the winter months, usually for chili, soups, or tomato sauces.

                              Happy New Year!

                              ETA: with all respect to coliver, don't let someone yuck on your yum before you've even tried the goddamn recipe. Cooking with a slow cooker takes trial and error.

                              1. re: KrumTx

                                Krum, Hazan's was the first I ever made and I think it's perfection in a sauce. Not yucking at all. Aren't there any things that you just don't tinker with. Maybe not. And when I DO make it, I make SO much that it really is hours and hours. I don't make it for convenience :)

                                1. re: c oliver

                                  Yeah, I know. I'm just being nostalgic about being in my 20s with a new appliance and new recipe, I suppose.

                                  No foul intended.

                                  1. re: c oliver

                                    I'm mainly trying it out so I can 1) try out the new slow cooker 2) find a recipe I can make often. My time is usually pretty limited so a recipe that takes hours of babysitting isn't something I can do very often. So, if this works out, I can add it to my repertoire of things I can make more than once a year.

                                    1. re: juliejulez

                                      and that truly is the beauty of a slow cooker! Many things that took me all day to make no longer have to be an all day affair. Does it match Hazan’s classic? Most likely no but if you can make a wonderful sauce, one you can make from good quality ingredients and make often while still having a work/life balance? That alone makes it worth it!

                                      There are many dishes I still do the “old fashioned way” but that doesn’t stop me from trying versions of these same dishes other ways-be it the slow cooker, the microwave or using a few readymade components.

                                      And as Krum noted a slow cooker is like anything else-trial and error. My first attempt at any dish is rarely as good as when I am experienced in making it

                                      1. re: foodieX2

                                        Personally, my family does not care for the Hazan classic. Not everyone loves all of her recipes.

                                    2. re: c oliver

                                      And I tried the Hazan recipe and was not blown away. I myself would be interested in another version, so nice to have choices.

                                      1. re: coll

                                        Yah, I thought the Hazan was a bit of a letdown, too.

                                        1. re: linguafood

                                          coll and lingua, what recipes do you favor?

                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            I don't cook by recipes for the most part. I use them as a general base for ingredient information and sometimes cooking times. But that's about it.

                                            I've made more satisfying bolognese sauce by throwing stuff together (don't tell anyone... it includes a good amount of tomato paste).

                                            1. re: linguafood

                                              I'm just not good enough a cook for that generally. I'm definitely a recipe follower.

                                              1. re: c oliver

                                                Eh, don't sell yerself short. Most things are pretty easy to make, especially if one has a good nose and tastebuds, as well as basic knowledge of ingredients and cooking techniques, i.e. experience. I'm sure you are quite capable.

                                                I just don't like following directions much :-)

                                                1. re: linguafood

                                                  Guess what? I rarely speed in my car either :) I don't know. I figure those folks (cookbook authors) get paid the big bucks and I should pay attention. I'm sure there must be a thread about this :)

                                                  1. re: c oliver

                                                    I do speed sometimes, but then I'm a pretty great driver.

                                                    I just can't be bothered to look up a recipe for, say, piccata or any other dish I've made umpteen times. I might look at a recipe once to get a basic idea, but I take it from there.

                                                    Tons of folks get paid big money for the things they do. That doesn't necessary equal quality.

                                                    I can count the number of *actual* recipes I use on one hand. Caesar dressing is one of them, as I've found a great one on the interwebs, caponata is another. But I think I even tweaked those to my liking.

                                                    1. re: c oliver

                                                      HaHa about not speeding in your car. I do if I don't pay attention but I am methodical about details so I pretty much follow recipes unless it is something I have been cooking for years. I have a list of several foods I want to try and cook in 2014 and one is Beef Wellington. I think I will add the Bolognese sauce to the list too.

                                                2. re: linguafood

                                                  Mmmm... Sounds familiar.
                                                  Pretty much sums up my approach

                                              2. re: linguafood

                                                After having made many bologneses I too have come to the conclusion that I do not like it as we'll.I like my sauce with more tomatoes. This one is my tried and true meat sauce.
                                                http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/pa...

                                                1. re: DowntownJosie

                                                  That sounds and looks fab. I might have to have pasta again soon! All that talk about bolognese.

                                                  Damn you, 'hounds! '-D

                                                  1. re: linguafood

                                                    I'm completely out of the sauce so that's on my list. And then, of course, I have to make here green lasagna. Sooo good. And, yeah, dammit, I follow the instructions :)

                                                    1. re: c oliver

                                                      I love this short rib and porcini lasagna, just as delicious and time consuming as MH.
                                                      http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/sh...

                                                  2. re: DowntownJosie

                                                    Thanks for the recipe. I'm going to make it!

                                                  3. re: linguafood

                                                    I'll third not being blown away by the Hazan version. I made a Batali version (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ma... ) and the Hazan recipe side-by-side one day, and both DH and I preferred Batali, although we did think that the Hazan recipe (which was substantially more acidic due to a higher proportion of tomato and wine) might work well in lasagne since it would stand up well to the creaminess of the bechamel. However, we keep going back to Batali, over and over. We also tried the Lynn Rosetto Kasper recipe from Splendid Table and found it much less to our tastes than the Batali.

                                                    1. re: biondanonima

                                                      OK, now I'm positively confused. I thought traditional bolognese sauce was made *without* tomatoes -- just meat, wine, milk? Cuz that's the recipe I've been thinking of, and it's clearly not the Hazan recipe......

                                                      I'm pretty sure I saw it here on CH at some point.

                                                      1. re: linguafood

                                                        As I understand it, traditional Bolognese is a meat sauce that is flavored with a small amount of tomato, either in the form of paste, sauce or crushed/whole tomatoes. I prefer sauces made with tomato paste, because to me they seem to have a meatier flavor with more umami, whereas those made with whole tomatoes are more acidic and taste more like a tomato sauce with meat (which I certainly enjoy, but that's not what I want when I want Bolognese!).

                                                        1. re: biondanonima

                                                          i remember a sara moulton show where she had two prominent italian chefs making the "real" bolognese --and each had a completely different recipe. it was fun to watch their rivalry, and they were very serious about which recipe was "true bolognese." LOL.

                                                          i'm sure someone here will recall who the two men were.

                                                      2. re: biondanonima

                                                        I like that Batali version. Think I'll try it. This is our usual, a knock off from CI.
                                                        http://365clevercookbooks.wordpress.c...

                                                    2. re: coll

                                                      My husband LOVES the Hazan recipe. I don't like bolognese regardless. Something in the texture...

                                                      1. re: Jerseygirl111

                                                        I once had Bolognese at a very nice restaurant, as the guest of an expert on Italian cooking, and the dish was sublime. He told me it tasted like filet mignon, which is what he found used in Italy quite often, and when he inquired they confirmed he was right. If I ever try making it again, I will make a point NOT to use chop meat.

                                                              1. re: foodieX2

                                                                But wouldn't one USE ground meat for it? If not, then what?

                                                                1. re: c oliver

                                                                  You USE ground meat, I USE chop meat; let's call the whole thing off ;-)

                                                                  http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=l...

                                                                  1. re: coll

                                                                    Please explain. You said you would not use "chop meat" which was then explained by foodieX2 as meaning ground meat. Don't you make it with ground meat?

                                                                    1. re: c oliver

                                                                      They're one and the same, is what people are trying to say. Except for this particular restaurant, it appears that they used ground/chop filet mignon.

                                                                      Yes?

                                                                      1. re: linguafood

                                                                        Well, that's what I think. But then coll said " I will make a point NOT to use chop meat." So I truly don't know what the hell :)

                                                                          1. re: linguafood

                                                                            I obviously missed the fact that she grinds her meat also.

                                                      1. re: KrumTx

                                                        I posted the CI down thread. Fussy but worth it IMHO

                                                      2. re: juliejulez

                                                        I'm so not a cook, but I'm trying, so please ignore the stupidity of this question (and this sounds good, too)...

                                                        When making this do you really not drain the grease from the meats first? That sounds kind of unappealing.

                                                        Thanks, Will

                                                        1. re: atomicpurple

                                                          I would be sure to get the leanest beef, or even use some chopped veal or pork. Or as I noted about, filet mignon or another type of home ground beef. When I made it on the stovetop, I found you DO need a bit more grease than usual, but if you got 70/30 chop meat I don't think it would be very appetizing.

                                                          1. re: atomicpurple

                                                            I don't drain the grease from the meats, but I do use fairly lean beef/pork/veal mince. Also, I make a couple of small changes to the Batali recipe I use - he calls for 8 tablespoons of oil/butter in addition to the meat fat, and there is a quarter pound of bacon/pancetta involved as well, which is quite fatty. What I do is render the bacon in just a bit of oil/butter to start, then saute the vegetables in that fat, rather than adding all the oil/butter he calls for and adding the unrendered bacon later as suggested.

                                                            For me, this amount of fat works perfectly for sweating the veg and I don't find the finished product greasy at all.

                                                            1. re: biondanonima

                                                              I think B sauce is supposed to be pretty "fatty." I use chuck or pork shoulder both of which have plenty of fat on them.

                                                              1. re: c oliver

                                                                It is supposed to be rich, but with the bacon in the Batali version, I find that there is plenty of fat if you render it out (and don't drain it) while still using lean mince (although I never buy anything leaner than 85/15, so I guess "lean" is a relative term).

                                                            2. re: atomicpurple

                                                              The grease came to the top while cooking, so I just skimmed it off with a spoon like the recipe said, right before serving. I used 88% lean ground beef.

                                                            3. re: juliejulez

                                                              Just finished eating. I really liked the cooking method.... started it at 10am before heading out to watch a hockey game and go furniture shopping, came home and it was still lightly simmering away.

                                                              As for the recipe itself, it was a bit meh. Needed more flavor. I didn't use ground pork, just all ground beef, because I didn't have the ground pork I thought I had in the freezer. I think this would be good with at least part italian sausage like someone in the comments suggested.

                                                              I'll still freeze the extras, it'll probably still be good in lasagna, with the addition of some more seasoning or sausage.

                                                              1. re: juliejulez

                                                                I have a rescue for you - a jar of Arabiata Sauce. Last winter we made a very bland batch of bolognese and ended up mixing the remains with the Trader Joe's Arabiata Sauce that our friends had recommended but was "too spicy" for Mr. B. A match made in heaven.

                                                                1. re: Berheenia

                                                                  i didn't realize trader joe's made an arabiata sauce. i'll look for it.

                                                                  julie - for the bolognese "meh"ness -- add salt to a small portion in a bowl to see if that helps. i'd also try fish sauce -- me, the heretic!

                                                                  1. re: alkapal

                                                                    Huge plus one on adding fish sauce to spag bol. We do it all the time. Secret ingredient!

                                                                2. re: juliejulez

                                                                  Sorry this didn't wow you julie. I took a look at the recipe you shared and 1/2tsp of thyme isn't a lot of seasoning for a large pot of bolognese. If you have some leftover, you might try brightening the flavours by tossing in some chopped fresh herbs. I usually finish mine with a handful of fresh basil and Italian parsley. Also, I find the saltiness of freshly grated parmesan brings out the earthy flavours of the dish. It might be worth stirring in a handful of that as well prior to serving.

                                                                  1. re: Breadcrumbs

                                                                    When we made our meh sauce it was after a marathon week of entertaining a crowd. I had bought some mirapoix from Trader Joe's and we used the rest of it in the Bolognese. It was the only culprit in our tried and true recipe - it was probably beyond it's sell by date.

                                                                    1. re: Breadcrumbs

                                                                      Yeah I definitely will be adding fresh herbs when I use it again. I didn't actually have any dried thyme so I did dried italian seasoning instead, but still... it did seem like such a small amount. The parmesan is a great idea too... I sprinkled some on top but adding it into the sauce would be good.

                                                                    2. re: juliejulez

                                                                      Bummer about the bland sauce but I'm sure it's salvageable. If you decide to try another recipe, I would choose one that uses milk instead of heavy cream. I made the Lynn Rosetto Kasper recipe a while back, and it called for cream - I felt like the dairy fat overwhelmed EVERYTHING else and just made the whole thing very blah, even though there were plenty of tasty ingredients in it.

                                                                      1. re: biondanonima

                                                                        SAME ISSUE with murgh makhani (Butter Chicken)-- the cream dulls the spices. that's why yogurt is used to cool the palate.

                                                                        if you want creamy AND spicy, one needs to really ramp up the spice level.

                                                                        1. re: alkapal

                                                                          Yes, this happens in a lot of Indian recipes. Heavy cream is listed as a sub for khoya (whole milk solids) in a lot of recipes/cookbooks, but I don't care for it - it dulls the flavors, whereas the khoya brings richness without all the tongue-coating fat. There are plenty of Indian dishes I thought I didn't care for (because they were too bland) until I had them made with khoya.

                                                                          1. re: biondanonima

                                                                            Is khoya similar to Turkish keimak? Like yogurt butterfat?

                                                                            1. re: ChristinaMason

                                                                              I don't know that I've ever had keimak, so I'm not sure. Khoya is basically SUPER evaporated milk - you start with whole milk and just boil it until all you have left is a ball of sticky solids, kind of the texture of silly putty. It's very rich and nutty tasting, not at all tangy (the way I would expect a yogurt product to be).

                                                                      2. re: juliejulez

                                                                        thats too bad! Lasagna with sausage sounds like a good choice.