HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Boneless Ribeye for Prime Rib, please help!

j
Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 11:53 AM

I have read several discussions on roasting the perfect prime rib. Since reading all of the threads/posts I was wondering if someone could break it down in dummy terms for me for my specific piece of meat. Please and thank you!!! Ok so, here are the details: i have a 16 lb boneless ribeye loin. The loin itself is almost as long as a half sheet pan and its kinda flat and wide versus the round fat kind. I have a rack and a sheet pan to roast this on. I do not have string to tie it up yet, but I can get this tomorrow. I also need to buy an instant read therm. I don't think i will be able to sear this meat at all, it's just too big. I prefer the slow and low method as i do not want to overcook this beast. My family prefers rare to med rare. Should i bake it then blast at the end for the crusty outside? And I'm confused about what temp i need to take it out to rest at to achieve perfect med rare. I also plan on keeping it simple, just a kosher salt and fresh coarse cracked pepper rub down. Thanks to any and all input. I also hope fourunder is still around, i consider you the king of beef sir!

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. 9
    9lives RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 12:12 PM

    I'd cook it at 450f for 30 mins, then lower the temp to 325f

    Take it out when the thermometer read 105-110f.

    Let it rest under a foil tent for 20-30 mins.

    Carve and enjoy!

    1 Reply
    1. re: 9lives
      9
      9lives RE: 9lives Dec 22, 2013 02:51 PM

      After reading some more, I have slightly altered plans.

      Sticking with the 450 sear, but going to finish at a lower temp..220f..and more time.

      I prefer rare to mr so I think pulling at 110 and letting it rest should work for me.

      Happy holidays!

    2. c oliver RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 12:19 PM

      fourunder is one of my heroes on CH and nowhere does he excel more than when cooking meat.

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/824994

      1 Reply
      1. re: c oliver
        f
        fourunder RE: c oliver Dec 22, 2013 01:38 PM

        You are always too kind.

      2. a
        amazinc RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 12:27 PM

        Do you have a kitchen torch? I do mine low and slow then
        "torch" it until I like the color. I use this gadget on so many
        things that I think it's the best $30 I've spent.

        1. j
          Jennilikesyum RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 12:50 PM

          I do not have a torch, but I could purchase one. I have issues with gadgets and my husband is a truck driver. He will not be home until Christmas eve, and I'm worried I will need to have this going well before he gets in, but I suppose I can figure it out. ☺️ Thanks everyone for your responses. I will review the other thread and start writing out my instructions. I appreciate your help, and Happy Holidays to you all!

          1. King of Northern Blvd RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 01:22 PM

            Try to get a probe thermometer that you leave in the roast and have a remote on the outside of the oven instead of an instant read if you can. This way you can know what is going on at all times.

            2 Replies
            1. re: King of Northern Blvd
              j
              Jennilikesyum RE: King of Northern Blvd Dec 24, 2013 06:29 AM

              Thank you King! I did invest in one of these, and for a mere $15.00 I think it's going to prove to be a very good investment. I saw a wireless one that will page you and do some other nifty things. Have you tried one of those yet?

              1. re: Jennilikesyum
                King of Northern Blvd RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 28, 2013 03:10 PM

                Glad to have helped. I have not tried a wireless one yet. Both of my remote thermometers died on Thanksgiving day before turkey went into oven. Need to look into getting a new one.

            2. f
              fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 01:41 PM

              awww shucks....my head's going to explode. :0)

              A few questions before I make your head explode. ...do you have 5-6 hours to dedicate to the beef.....and what sides do you have planned and expect to need the oven for?

              18 Replies
              1. re: fourunder
                j
                Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 22, 2013 04:00 PM

                Well, I will have a mac n cheese recipe that uses the oven, everything else is cooked different ways. We are smoking a turkey breast and deep frying a whole one so that clears the oven basically. And yessir, I have all of tomorrow and the next half day to get it prepared. I would like to be serving around 4-5pm Est on Christmas Eve.

                Tomorrow morning I will go get the probe thermometer and also from a previous post I read of yours I understand you do tie all of your roasts, so I'm in need of butchers twine also. Any recommended brands etc on the twine and therm?

                Oh, the roast is in my fridge still in the same plastic vacuum wrap from Sams. Should I unwrap this?

                1. re: Jennilikesyum
                  f
                  fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 04:34 PM

                  Based on the details....I surmise you are planning to heat and brown the Mac n' Cheese for about an hour. If that's so, then the two hour rest is perfect for your timeline.

                  I would plan on getting the roast into the oven no later than 11 AM and follow the instructions....450* for 20-30 minutes, then drop down to 225*. The only other thing to do is rotate the roast inside the oven at the two hour mark. Continue roasting until you hit your target temperature.

                  I would hold the roast inside the oven at 140*, until you need to place the Mac n' Cheese into the oven. At that time you can cover it outside the oven. Heat your M n' C. I assume you are going to brown the casserole, so your oven will already be preheated high. Simply place your roast back into the oven, keep at 450 for 10-15 minutes....or crank up to 500* for 10 minutes.

                  If your roast hits temperature early, don't worry, it's a good thing. the longer rest will continue to tenderize the meat. It's far easier to hold a roast than to cook it up quickly and defeat the purpose of the Low & Slow approach.

                  In your original post, you mention that the roast is a flatter, rather than rounder shape. This is more important than the weight of the roast for estimation of cooking time. Although the following thread address a Boneless Strip Loin Roast, cooking any beef cut is similar in time and temperature. Have a read here and if not mistaken, the Strip Loin took me about 4-4.5 hours @ 215*

                  http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8328...

                  If you need anymore clarification or direction, please do not hesitate to ask. Also , refer to the following thread already alluded to by COliver.. It has all the necessary information and experiences from others to give you all the assurances and confidence you need to carry this task out.

                  It's really as simple as putting the meat in the oven and taking it out.

                  1. re: fourunder
                    j
                    Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 23, 2013 05:25 PM

                    Seasoned, without the twine. :/

                     
                    1. re: fourunder
                      j
                      Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 23, 2013 05:37 PM

                      Ok, so... I put on a new poncho, picked this sucker up like a fat baby and went to wrapping. I'm hoping when I grow up I will be able to tie a roast pretty like fourunder.

                       
                      1. re: Jennilikesyum
                        c oliver RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 23, 2013 05:49 PM

                        So, did you tie it really tight? I'd have thought it would have "rounded up" a bit. But I've never done one either :)

                        1. re: c oliver
                          j
                          Jennilikesyum RE: c oliver Dec 23, 2013 05:52 PM

                          I tried to tie it pretty tight, but the meat is cold and a bit stiff. I hope I did it well enough. I was also a little worried on the edges that if the fat melts away that the string wrapped there will just pop off. I guess we will see! I'll try and post a picture when it's done. Assuming I don't destroy it!

                          1. re: c oliver
                            j
                            Jennilikesyum RE: c oliver Dec 23, 2013 05:57 PM

                            Oh, if you wouldn't mind me picking your brain a minute, I have another question. I trimmed only a small portion of fat from the top of the "cap". I didn't even think to do this til i started rubbing it down with seasonings and realized i had just a layer of fat up there I could just peel away from another layer of fat. That's the part I removed. I'm positive there is still a nice thick layer of fat on there but my pan is only about an inch deep. Do you think that there's a chance of fat drippings overflow? I put foil in the pan, but I can always remove that prior to the bake. Thanks in advance!

                          2. re: Jennilikesyum
                            f
                            fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 23, 2013 08:30 PM

                            The netting (and Roast) looks great/.....you just have to learn to loop under, back over and under to the next string....and repeat. To tie a string so it does not loosen, you just go back over and under to create what is known as a surgical stitch. It's like tying your shoes...but before you pull tight, you just go over and under again and pull tight...There's probably a video on YouTube.

                        2. re: Jennilikesyum
                          f
                          fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 05:18 PM

                          I forgot to address the following. Twine is twinw....I've never seen a label or brand affixed, but I get the large spool in the restaurant supply house....it's about 5-6 bucks

                          it's not necessary to tie the roasts, but it does help to keep it together and and have the Fat Cap/Deckle stay in place. You can make it look professional and do every inch, but every 3 inches would be fine. if you do every inch, it will help you as a guide when you slice the meat to keep it true and not veer off for inconsistent slices. I purchase the twin in big rolls, but you can purchase them in smaller spindles(?). You cab even use the red & white bakery twine they use to tie off bakery boxes. The red is color safe dye.. I've see the smaller spools in Latin Ethnic markets, as they use it a lot to tie off tamales from what I'm told. The spools go for about $1.25. If you can't find them in a food or food supply store....any cotton rope will suffice from a crafts store. You really do not need that much....or just ask where you purchased the meat from. they should give it to you as a courtesy. In a pinch, you could even use double or triple sewing thread..

                          I purchased my roasts on Thursday Night and removed the plastic then and am currently air drying them in the fridge now.. I season 48 hours in advance of placing in the oven. Unless there are serious hard dried surfaces, I don't expect to shave and trim the roast very much after only a week......so I recommend you remove from Cryovac packaging, rinse and pat dry.....sooner than later.

                          1. re: fourunder
                            j
                            Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 23, 2013 05:18 PM

                            Ok, whew! I did the unwrapping earlier today but I forgot to dry it! I hope this isn't going to ruin it. I also seasoned it with a small jar of Ms Dash, and about a quarter cup of kosher salt. I guess that kinda defeats that whole salt free thing. ;) i wanted to use Salt Free 17 however I couldn't find any at local markets and no time to order from Amazon. In my haste today to get all my sweets baking done I failed toc heck this thread earlier and I have once again caught another goof. I bought butchers twine earlier at Earthfare, but I forgot to wrap the roast! Is it too late to just pick it up and start wrapping this around with the seasoning on it? I pretty much rubbed the entire thing down pretty heavy. I thought I'd read that you let yours sit open in the fridge with the seasoning on it, or someone somewhere mentioned this so that's where it is at right now. In your opinion should i remove it from the fridge tonight to let it get up to room temperature, my husband is expected home around 6am, or would you recommend I wait until then? And thanks again fourunder and everyone else for this valuable input and direction!

                            1. re: Jennilikesyum
                              f
                              fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 23, 2013 08:38 PM

                              It's 11:30 here where I am.....I would just take it out now or before you retire to be. There's a lot of debate as to when, or even if there is a need to remove from the fridge. If you like rare, keeping the roast cold will help to keep it rare, as it simply takes longer to heat up...for anything else, removing will aid in reducing the overall time....Whether or not it is proper food handling....It's what i do and I admit to it....pretty much always more than two hours and I've never hurt anyone yet....the same people come back for every holiday and no one ever declines the meat.

                              If you do leave the meat until 6AM, expect the roast to take 30-60+ minutes to hit your target temperature at 225* or less.

                              1. re: fourunder
                                j
                                Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 24, 2013 06:13 AM

                                Ok wonderful. I took it out before bed (2 am EST) so it's been coming up to temperature since then. Thank you so much for all the helpful advice. I look forward to carving a beautiful roast! Will let you know how it turns out.
                                Cheers~ Jenni
                                Happy Holidays everyone!!!

                                1. re: Jennilikesyum
                                  f
                                  fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 24, 2013 07:41 AM

                                  You did a very nice tying the roast. Again, you just need to learn the under over looping, and you do not need to do it in one continuous string. When you get into larger roasts...I always have to add and tie off with knots. Even most butchers tie the roast with single strings around and so not create a net. Here's mine seasoned and tied off last night. Three separate roasts..All turned out different in looks

                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  1. re: fourunder
                                    j
                                    Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 24, 2013 08:09 AM

                                    Oh nice, very impressive! I know I'm probably wearing you out but I've been confused with temperatures. I'm looking for anything medium rare. Could also lean towards rarer medium rare. What should i shoot for? Thanks again!!! Your roasts lookw onderful!

                                    1. re: Jennilikesyum
                                      f
                                      fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 24, 2013 08:27 AM

                                      * 450, 20 minutes

                                      * 225, till it hits 118-122....the carryover will be 5-7*

                                      * you'll have a digital probe, correct? This should happen around the 3-3.5 hour mark.

                                      * To be safe, figure 5-6 hours total time before you plan to serve.

                                      enjoy.

                        3. re: fourunder
                          j
                          Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Feb 15, 2014 09:38 PM

                          Here I go again! I have a boneless 10 lb roast this time. I reviewed this entire thread and I think the initial blast my first go with the preheated oven is why it cooked up so fast. I am going low and slow again, and will try to post a detailed roast with temps/times/pics. This was going to be a V Day roast but with the ice storm our celebration was postponed. More to come soon! ♡

                          1. re: Jennilikesyum
                            f
                            fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Feb 15, 2014 09:53 PM

                            Very nice...I always do 450 for 20 minutes and drop down to 210-225. No worries for a outer gray band or overcooking. Looking forward to hearing about the successful results.

                            1. re: Jennilikesyum
                              gmm RE: Jennilikesyum Feb 15, 2014 10:07 PM

                              If you feel like doing some reading...http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/th...

                              http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/20...

                              This is the method I've been using, basically cook low and slow at 200°, then blast at 500° to brown. The recipe says the cooking time is the same regardless of the size of the roast, anywhere from 3-12 lbs. I don't know how confident I feel about that though. My roasts have only been around 4lbs.

                          2. Wtg2Retire RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 01:44 PM

                            I had that problem, so took time the other night to come up with a "timeline" following fourunder's instructions. I worked from an array of messages regarding this process. I hope this is correct. If it is not, please help me correct it.

                            — Dry-Age in refrigerator for 7 Days
                            — 48 hours in advance of cooking, season with Kosher salt and cracked black pepper and return to refrigerator
                            — The evening before cooking the next day, sit roast on counter overnight to bring to room temperature
                            — When ready to start roasting, preheat oven to 450°
                            — Place roast on V-rack bones down with fat cap on top in roasting pan
                            — When oven has heated to 450°, put in roast to brown/sear for 20 minutes
                            — After 20 minutes, turn the oven temp down to 200°
                            — Target temperature around 120° for Medium-Rare check with instant read thermometer and when met remove roast from oven
                            — Wrap the roast in foil, put bowl over it, and then wrap towel around bowl for at least 1 hour – even 2 hours is okay
                            — When almost ready to serve, preheat oven to 450°
                            — When oven has heated to 450°, return roast to oven for a high heat blast for 10 minutes
                            — At the end of the 10 minutes, remove roast from the oven
                            — Ready to slice and serve - no other resting period required

                            16 Replies
                            1. re: Wtg2Retire
                              f
                              fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 22, 2013 02:24 PM

                              W....

                              You've pretty much nailed everything correctly, but just to fine tune since you have not mentioned any specifics on the size of your roast, i.e., Boneless Roast, 3 or 4+ Ribs, shape, weight and accounting for unknown variables(calibration/accuracy of oven)

                              * Unless it is a full 7+Rib Roast, generally removing about 4-6 hours from the refrigerator is fine, but large roasts I remove before I retire for bed.....I leave mine in the basement, where it never gets above 60*

                              * The sear can be 20-30 minutes. Once it starts to sizzle and you can smell the beef, I give it a few more minutes and it's suffice to turn down.

                              * At 200 degrees, after you hit your target temperature and you begin the holding period....the carryover heat will not be more than 5*. My experience is unless the crowd truly likes RARE beef, it's probably a little better and safer to go up to 122-125. I'm doing two bone-in (3 & 4 Rib). at 225* this year. For Medium-Rare, my target is going to be 125* this year, shooting for a finished temperature of 130+ < 135*. I'll remove the first roast, then shoot for 130 for the second roast, looking to hit 140+ <145* for a finished temperature of Medium for the crowd that likes the meat a little more cooked. I'll cover the first roast with the large stainless steel bowl you saw in the other thread and wrap in towels....when the second roast hits first target temperature, I replace the first roast back into the oven to continue the two hour resting period.

                              * I recommend a two hour rest or holding period....minimum one hour. I believe the key to the best results for zero bleeding is to rest as long as possible.

                              * How you described holding the roast is how I do so outside of the oven. If I can, I keep the roast inside the oven after I hit the target temperature, e.g. 130*. i crack the door open for 5 minutes to let any heat escape, then I set my thermostat at 140* to hold for 2 hours. Once you reduce the heat from 200, after the carryover effect ends, the cooking process has also stopped and the meat does not cook up.

                              Points to note:

                              To me, a finished temp @ 125 is usually too Rare for most tastes....but you know your guests better than I. My experience is most like to say they like rare or medium-rare...when actually they really like the next level up.....Prime Rib is a little different than steak in this regard....having worked at the Country Club for years at various receptions....you would be surprised how many came back for being under-cooked.

                              * you can use some oil or fat to brush the roast before the sear....and before the blast. The oil will aid in sizzling the beef surface for a little better crust.

                              * With Low & slow, you will not get very much in the form of any pan juices, but you will get fond. You can scrape the fond to make some Jus....if you do not, still make sure to transfer the roast to a new pan , otherwise the fond on the sheet pan/roasting pan will most definitely burn and smoke your kitchen.

                              1. re: fourunder
                                Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 22, 2013 03:22 PM

                                Thank you so very much, fourunder. With this info, I feel good about doing justice to the prime rib. I have never cooked one before. Thanks to you and all of the others posting about prime rib, I feel confident.

                                1. re: fourunder
                                  Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 22, 2013 04:02 PM

                                  I made a mistake above, my plan is to turn the oven temp from 450 to 225 not 200. I am uncertain about the roast I have, to me it seems to be a 5 bone, but the butcher told me it is a 3 bone. I know it weighs 7.44 pounds with the bones in. I did have the butcher cut the meat from the bone and the tie it back. There doesn't seem to much much of a fat cap, so I believe tomorrow, I will vist the butcher and ask for some fat to put on top.

                                  1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                    f
                                    fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 22, 2013 04:10 PM

                                    You most likely have a 3-Rib, 4-Rib by the weight you have indicated. I'm using 225 and roasting 2 separate roasts . the 225* setting will just get yo there a little sooner. You are still looking at 3-3.5 plus your rest.

                                    1. re: fourunder
                                      Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 22, 2013 04:21 PM

                                      Thank you so much, once again.

                                      1. re: fourunder
                                        Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 22, 2013 04:26 PM

                                        I am beginning to worry again. Originally I thought I was going to be feeding 6, because 2 men were out of the country working. Now I have found out the 2 are returning today. Will the size roast I have feed 8 people. I have so much to learn about prime rib.

                                        1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                          f
                                          fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 22, 2013 04:37 PM

                                          Basic rule is 1 bone per two guests.... For hearty eaters...I would go 1 to 1 or a couple of extra.

                                          I guarantee your guests have never had the Prime Rib results you will give them, so there will be request for seconds

                                          All the local supermarkets here in NJ are selling Prime Rib for 4.99/lb., very inexpensive. I'm planning on two roasts, each averaging about 7 lbs. I'm cooking one to Medium-Rare and the other to Medium.

                                          1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                            f
                                            fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 22, 2013 05:20 PM

                                            I forgot to mention, if you do not add to the total weight of your roast/s for your party, you have more incentive now to try the low and slow approach. With low temperature roasting, you will have minimal shrinkage of the meat for the highest possible yield in servings.

                                            1. re: fourunder
                                              Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 23, 2013 05:54 AM

                                              I will go out to buy another roast this morning. Hope to not have to ask anymore questions. You have been very gracious in answering my inquiries very promptly. Thank you.

                                              1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                f
                                                fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 23, 2013 08:42 AM

                                                No problem...always glad to help. even on Christmas Day, I'll be on and off the computer until 2PM....out dinner is planned for 3.PM.... so I'll get the Prime Ribs and a Leg of Lamb in around 9-930AM.

                                                I'm going to need two ovens now., but I have that covered.....I'm even toying with the idea of possibly using a Nesco Counter Top Air Roast Oven. I picked one up at a Thrift Store for 5 bucks and it looks new, but it is missing the fan attachment.

                                                 
                                                1. re: fourunder
                                                  Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 25, 2013 11:57 AM

                                                  HELP PLEASE. Put the flat 12+ lb in the 450 oven at 9:00 a.m. and blasted for 20 minutes. Per your advice checked for the temp at 1:30 p.m. and the darned digital thermometer is not working. Juices are running out of the roast and found my oven only goes as low as 170. So, we took it out of the oven and have loosely covered with foil.

                                                  How do you test for doneness without a thermometer. We don't want raw-rare, but we don't want over done either.

                                                  1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                    woodburner RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 25, 2013 12:21 PM

                                                    Jeez... you need a thermo. Go to a neighbor to borrow one. Go to a store. The supermarket will have a cheap dial thermo.

                                                    1. re: woodburner
                                                      f
                                                      fourunder RE: woodburner Dec 25, 2013 12:37 PM

                                                      Cheapos work pretty good too.

                                                       
                                                       
                                                      1. re: woodburner
                                                        Wtg2Retire RE: woodburner Dec 27, 2013 02:44 PM

                                                        I totally agree. I put it on my shopping list as soon as Fourunder helped me get the situation under control. As I said, I am so mad that this thermometer was used only once and no longer works. Not a cheapo but not what to my mind was inexpensive either. Don't want to pay so much money for a Thermopen.

                                                        1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                          woodburner RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 27, 2013 05:57 PM

                                                          Hey: If you have a remote with a probe on a wire, which goes back to the main unit, sometimes they go crazy (reading out impossible temps) when water gets into the joint between the metal probe and the wire.

                                                          if you lay the metal probe and wire joint in the bottom of a small pot, and cover with like 1/2 in. of veg oil, and boil for a f minute, it will force that water out of the joint and it will work again! Or buy a new probe/wire unit (sold separately).

                                                          1. re: woodburner
                                                            Wtg2Retire RE: woodburner Dec 28, 2013 01:29 PM

                                                            Good info. Thanks for sharing.

                                    2. woodburner RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 02:26 PM

                                      Wow. So many opinions. A lot of fancy and intricate stuff, too.

                                      I like fourunder's recommendation for low and slow -- hard to go wrong -- but also takes a bit of time.

                                      I have had excellent results with the simple k salt and coarse pepper, plus some granulated garlic and a touch of cayenne. No Tying. No torch. No 450 (ouch says the roast). Just trim any excessive fat, but leave a nice layer. Fat side up. It is already one nice piece of meat. I like to go either oven or grill/smoker hot -- maybe 325 -- and that whole roast will take about 3 or 3.5 hrs to get to 120 internal. That's where I pull it, tent it for about 30 min. And it will be a beautiful med-rare throughout with a nice exterior crust.

                                      Simple and reasonably quick. Make this horseradish sauce from my friend Anna to go with. You will plotz (look it up on a yiddish translator).

                                      HORSERADISH SAUCE

                                      16 oz sour cream
                                      Jar of Gold's prepared horseradish (drain)
                                      2 T mayo
                                      Small jar whole grain mustard
                                      lemon zest and juice of half lemon
                                      worcestershire sauce
                                      S&P
                                      Tabasco

                                      You can cut in half for one roast.

                                      3 Replies
                                      1. re: woodburner
                                        s
                                        skyy38 RE: woodburner Dec 29, 2013 06:02 PM

                                        Fat side up? Why?

                                        1. re: skyy38
                                          fldhkybnva RE: skyy38 Dec 29, 2013 06:05 PM

                                          Gravity I suspect, let the drippings fall onto the meat and not settle into the pan

                                          1. re: skyy38
                                            f
                                            fourunder RE: skyy38 Dec 29, 2013 07:07 PM

                                            Self basting...

                                        2. MamasCooking RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 02:56 PM

                                          I have never prepared a boneless prime rib and the largest I have done is probably 8-10 pounds. The method WTG references works start with high heat then low slow and luscious:)

                                          1. j
                                            Jennilikesyum RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 22, 2013 04:09 PM

                                            Thanks again to each and everyone of you who have taken the time to read and reply! It's very much appreciated. I am so nervous about this since it's my first Prime Rib!

                                            2 Replies
                                            1. re: Jennilikesyum
                                              Wtg2Retire RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 23, 2013 05:56 AM

                                              Jenn, when I have time today, I plan on posting an update including all the info that fourunder has provided. Hope this will help. I know exactly how you feel since this is my first prime rib, too.

                                              1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                j
                                                Jennilikesyum RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 24, 2013 07:01 PM

                                                I hope yours will be or has been a success as well!

                                            2. Wtg2Retire RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 23, 2013 07:04 AM

                                              I could not wait until later. I am so hyped up about this. If needs corrections, please let me know.

                                              PRIME RIB PREPARATION AND ROASTING

                                              — How much prime rib to purchase:
                                              Select a prime rib roast that has a lot of marbling, which is the visible fat running throughout the meat. The more marbling there is in the meat the more moist and flavorful it will be when cooked. *Basic rule is 1 bone per two guests.... For hearty eaters...I would go 1 to 1 or a couple of extra. I guarantee your guests have never had the Prime Rib results you will give them, so there will be request for seconds. You most likely have a 3-Rib, 4-Rib by the weight you have indicated (7.44 lbs). I'm using 225° and roasting 2 separate roasts . the 225° setting will just get you there a little sooner. You are still looking at oven time of 3-3.5 plus your 2 hour rest time.

                                              — Preparing Meat for Cooking:
                                              — You can leave the meat attached to the bone or have the butcher cut meat away and tie the roast. It has been suggested that the butcher cut the bone away and retie makes carving easier. However, when I was purchasing the roast, another lady was buying hers also. She said she has prepared prime rib low and slow for many years and that they have prime rib quite frequently, but never has the butcher cut the bone away. She advised that it is very easy to carve after cooking. She said her mother always has the butcher cut the bone away and retie. So it is your choice. I could not find what fourunder recommends concerning this.
                                              — Dry-Age in refrigerator for 7 Days
                                              — 48 hours in advance of cooking, season with Kosher salt and cracked black pepper and return to refrigerator

                                              — Removing roast from refrigerator:
                                              — *For a 3 or 4+ Rib roast remove roast from refrigerator about 4-6 hours before ready to start cooking.
                                              — *For a full, large 7+Rib Roast, I remove before I retire for bed.....I leave mine in the basement, where it never gets above 60°

                                              — After the roast has reached room temperature:
                                              — When ready to start roasting, preheat oven to 450°
                                              — Place roast on V-rack bones down with fat cap on top in roasting pan
                                              — When oven has heated to 450°, put in roast to brown/sear for 20 minutes. *The sear can be 20-30 minutes. Once it starts to sizzle and you can smell the beef, I give it a few more minutes and it's suffice to turn down. You can use some oil or fat to brush the roast before the sear....and before the blast. The oil will aid in sizzling the beef surface for a little better crust.
                                              — After 20-30 minutes, turn the oven temp down to 225°
                                              — Target temperature around 125° for Medium-Rare check with instant read thermometer and when met remove roast from oven. * My experience is unless the crowd truly likes RARE beef, it's probably a little better and safer to go up to 122-125. I'm doing two bone-in (3 & 4 Rib). at 225° this year. For Medium-Rare, my target is going to be 125° this year, shooting for a finished temperature of 130+ < 135°. I'll remove the first roast, then shoot for 130 for the second roast, looking to hit 140+ <145° for a finished temperature of Medium for the crowd that likes the meat a little more cooked. I'll cover the first roast with the large stainless steel bowl you saw in the other thread and wrap in towels....when the second roast hits first target temperature, I replace the first roast back into the oven to continue the two hour resting period.

                                              — The resting period two ways:
                                              — # 1 Outside the Oven - Wrap the roast in foil, put bowl over it, and then wrap towel around bowl for at least 1 hour – even 2 hours is okay *I recommend a two hour rest or holding period....minimum one hour. I believe the key to the best results for zero bleeding is to rest as long as possible.
                                              — # 2 In the Oven - *How you described holding the roast (# 1) is how I do so outside of the oven. If I can, I keep the roast inside the oven after I hit the target temperature, e.g. 130°. i crack the door open for 5 minutes to let any heat escape, then I set my thermostat at 140° to hold for 2 hours. Once you reduce the heat from 200, after the carryover effect ends, the cooking process has also stopped and the meat does not cook up.
                                              — When almost ready to serve, preheat oven to 450°
                                              — When oven has heated to 450°, return roast to oven for a high heat blast for 10 minutes. *You can use some oil or fat to brush the roast before the blast. The oil will aid in sizzling the beef surface for a little better crust.
                                              — At the end of the 10 minutes, remove roast from the oven
                                              — Ready to slice and serve - no other resting period required

                                              Points to note:
                                              *To me, a finished temp @ 125° is usually too Rare for most tastes....but you know your guests better than I. My experience is most like to say they like rare or medium-rare...when actually they really like the next level up.....Prime Rib is a little different than steak in this regard....having worked at the Country Club for years at various receptions....you would be surprised how many came back for being under-cooked.
                                              * With Low & slow, you will not get very much in the form of any pan juices, but you will get fond. You can scrape the fond to make some Jus....if you do not, still make sure to transfer the roast to a new pan , otherwise the fond on the sheet pan/roasting pan will most definitely burn and smoke your kitchen.

                                              *Indicate responses or paraphrased responses from fourunder

                                              6 Replies
                                              1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                c oliver RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 23, 2013 07:42 AM

                                                Is the a compilation from other replies? Or have you already cooked it?

                                                1. re: c oliver
                                                  Wtg2Retire RE: c oliver Dec 23, 2013 01:25 PM

                                                  This is a compilation of comments/advise/suggestions/thoughts from the many message threads I read and for my own ability to prepare and cook the roast (my head was spinning from all of the info). I have never cooked a standing rib roast, but I want my first one to be wonderful and to treat the meat with the respect it deserves.

                                                2. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                  f
                                                  fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 23, 2013 08:26 AM

                                                  You're hired....

                                                  Btw. my two roasts are now up to three 4-Rib

                                                  If you click on this post in the thread *Prime rib Successes and Disasters*

                                                  you can see how I slice the bones, but leave them partially attached.

                                                  http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8249...

                                                  1. re: fourunder
                                                    Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 23, 2013 01:39 PM

                                                    I will definitely go review that message.

                                                    Had to end up purchasing a 7-rib roast; there were no smaller ones left. I will just put the 3-rib in the freezer and have it later - it has been dry aging so I hope that putting it in the freezer will be okay.

                                                    Regardless, the 7-rib will not have as much time to air dry. And darn it, I just realized I did not have the butcher cut it from the bone and tie it and get additional fat to put on the roast. So your message linked above may have been your ESP working.

                                                    The 7-rib weighs 12.82 pounds and from looking at pictures you have posted, I believe it is more of a flat roast than a round one. After reviewing additional posts about larger roasts, I believe this one will take about 4-5 hours just in the cooking phase. Does that sound about right?

                                                    BTW, I am also still working on updating the instructions. Do I have your permission to post them? I had not thought about that previously, but this is all your work. You may e-mail me at Fairwayser@yahoo.com

                                                    Are you up to three roasts because of additional guests? Just curious.

                                                    P.S. I have decided to go with your thoughts about the target temperature, so will go more towards the hi

                                                    1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                      f
                                                      fourunder RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 23, 2013 08:53 PM

                                                      First, I am up to three roasts, because of added guest and for guests to be able to take leftover home if desired. I'm also roasting a Leg of Lamb that's been wet aged for three weeks and air drying since yesterday.

                                                      The flatter roast generally cooks faster...but the bones add some time. I would plan on around 6.5-7 hours....4.5 to roast, then the hold. Again, if it hits temperature sooner, just hold the roast. I'm presently arguing with my brother now for oven time....silly, since I've purchased all the meat and cooking it at his wife's (My SIL) request.

                                                      I may just try to cook everything in my own oven just to break his chops and let him know....he may have the Viking Stove...but it doesn't mean he know how to roast meat...I'm considering cooking at 200* for a longer period of time. Generally, when you have multiple roasts, you need to add an additional 30 minutes for each additional roast @ 250. I'll just figure a way to fit it all in and see what happens.

                                                      I realize this is your first Prime Rib and you want it to come out great.....but I've cooked enough to know with patience and time, it's pretty hard to screw up....you can get a clunker for a roast, but it will be beautifully pink inside. I don't really fret too much..If I come in late, so be it. but if I go low at 200, I'm looking at around 8 hours with four roasts...it obvious it's not ideal, but there's only one way to find out if it is possible. Worst case scenario is I have to pull one roast out and use my brother's oven ....cook to target temperature and hold it for two hours outside the oven in a cooler. I'm not worried about making the perfect roast, just a good one with pink inside..

                                                      1. re: fourunder
                                                        Wtg2Retire RE: fourunder Dec 24, 2013 08:23 AM

                                                        First, you are so generous to want to provide guests with leftover prime if they desire. Don't know that I am going to be that generous.

                                                        Can't brothers and sisters be a pain at times! They can be such darned irritants. Go for cooking in your own oven and let him keep his Viking for himself. Though his wife needs to tell him you will be using the Viking at her request (maybe he is up set with her thinking that he can't roast worth a dang because she ask you to do the roasting and he is going to play the wronged spouse by keeping the Viking to himself). LOL.

                                                        Again, thank you so much for giving me so much needed advice and encouragement.

                                                        Blessings upon you and yours and have a very Merry Christmas.

                                                3. j
                                                  Jennilikesyum RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 24, 2013 04:31 PM

                                                  Thanks everyone for your help. Prime Rib #1 was a success! I was very worried because I hit temp at 1pm! Only two hours in. I set my oven to warm. The roast went as high as 140 during rest, and the first cut did scare me but the second cut was much more red and there was no juice on the board, but plenty in the meat. So thankful you all were able to help me in making my first PR! Happy Holidays!! :*

                                                   
                                                  6 Replies
                                                  1. re: Jennilikesyum
                                                    Wtg2Retire RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 24, 2013 04:34 PM

                                                    Congratulations, Jenn. Hope I have the same success tomorrow.

                                                    1. re: Wtg2Retire
                                                      j
                                                      Jennilikesyum RE: Wtg2Retire Dec 24, 2013 07:03 PM

                                                      Thank you so much, and enjoy the cooking. I was so stressed and overall, it was a piece of cake!

                                                    2. re: Jennilikesyum
                                                      f
                                                      fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 24, 2013 10:00 PM

                                                      Very nice to hear you had an enjoyable roast.....I don't think I ever hit temperature that quick though....another reason to have a digital probe thermometer. Congrats...

                                                      1. re: fourunder
                                                        c oliver RE: fourunder Dec 25, 2013 07:37 AM

                                                        I was wondering if the oven is off. That WAS very quick.

                                                        1. re: fourunder
                                                          j
                                                          Jennilikesyum RE: fourunder Dec 25, 2013 08:27 AM

                                                          We don't have a very impressive oven. To be honest I thought something was wrong. I'm guessing that the 40 minutes on 400/450 really gave it a boost. I also had it preheated. Not sure if I was supposed to do that or not, but yes I was super worried when it hit temp two hours in. We didn't serve until 6 pm also so I was freaking out until we actually cut it. In the picture it seems very overcooked but maybe my flash brightened it up. The second cut and on gave perfect med rare, very bright red with blood pooling on the meat if you pressed on the slice with a fork. I told my husband next year I'm going to ask Santa for new kitchen appliances.

                                                          Merry Christmas everyone!

                                                          1. re: Jennilikesyum
                                                            f
                                                            fourunder RE: Jennilikesyum Dec 25, 2013 08:47 AM

                                                            The 450 in the beginning should only be for 20 minutes in a preheated oven.....if putting in a cold oven, then the 40 would be okay, though not recommended....If you used a digital probe, I'm curious to know if the alarm sounded at your target set?

                                                            For future reference, even if you hit your temperature early, just open the door, let the heat escape for a few minutes , then keep your roast in the oven at 140 to keep warm and hold the roast. it will not cook up past the carryover. You can remove the roast when you need the oven for sides. When the sides are finished, you put the roast back into the oven for a warm-up phase, or not....or simply do the high heat blast. When the last sides are removed from the oven, you put the roast back in at 4508 for 10-15 minute....or you crank up the oven to 500*, let it get hot and then put the roast in for about 8 minutes.

                                                      Show Hidden Posts