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Induction cookware questions

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I have a new induction cooktop which I really love. I saw an older discussion thread here on the subject of locating a griddle meant to span two burners. At the time there didn't seem to be a consensus of opinion. I'm hoping that in the meantime some manufacturer has come through. Anyone know of anything that would fit the bill? I've seen plenty of two-sided cast iron grills but I wonder if it can be used with the ridged side down. I've already noticed that with regular pans you can't leave a large part of the cooking surface uncovered or the burner turns off.

Which leads me into my second question. One of my burners is quite large and is useless for smaller cookware. If the coil doesn't sense that it is completely covered (or nearly so) it simply turns itself off. Is there a device or product meant to solve this problem on the market?
Thanks in advance for all suggestions!

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  1. Hi, edpa:

    (1) Yes, you can place the ridged side down; be careful you don't scratch your glass, though.

    (2) Yes, you can fool the detection circuit with a converter disk. These are widely available, but (a) you need to determine (just like with a pan) whether the disk is also large enough to trip the detector; (b) you must be careful not to overheat the glass; and (c) some would say it "defeats the purpose" of induction's efficiency.

    Aloha,
    Kaleo

    17 Replies
    1. re: kaleokahu

      Hey Kaleo,

      This makes me wonder, though, if an aluminum sandwich disk with a small pan on top might work just fine, especially if the pot is thin.

      I would say a cast iron disk would certainly render the quick response moot, but surely one of the disks out there must be good.

      1. re: DuffyH

        I believe all disks would work equally as well. You're just using them to radiate heat similar to a radiant cooktop.

        As for cast iron's responsiveness on induction...it is very fast to respond. I find it heats much faster than with any other cooking method...that is my perception only. No scientific experiments have been performed...nor with they be by me.

        1. re: DuffyH

          Hi, Duffy:

          I'm not sure I'm catching your meaning, but let me try.

          I haven't fooled with the disks much, but I bet there *are* good converter disks out there. I think, with all the ones I've seen, responsiveness is not emphasized at all. Rather, they are made simply so as to work and not warp. So a thick ferritic disk, to the extent that it has much thermal capacity, is going to blunt the responsiveness on an induction coil. And if it's thin enough to be truly responsive, it likely won't stay flat. The same can be said of pans as well to some extent, and a balance must be struck for all that convenience of induction and the compatible cladware aimed at it.

          I think the biggest problems with the converter disks have to do with the induction hob you try to put them on. Will the X model disk even trip the detector on Make Y, Model Z? If so, will the overheat sensor work? If not, you could crack your Ceran; if so, it might shut the hob down at an effective cooking temperature lower than what you want. Sadly, finding the right converter disk might be a long, ad hoc process. And the disks on the market are not inexpensive, either.

          If ever I get unrestricted access to a high-end induction top and a thermographic camera with which to compare copper-on-gas, clad-on-induction, and copper-on--induction-on-disk, I'm going to do a comprehensive set of tests. When I do, I'm particularly interested in quantifying the energy consumption "savings" of clad-on-induction over copper-on-disk, and copper-on-gas versus clad-on-induction. As far as I know, no one has actually done this.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

          1. re: kaleokahu

            Good morning Kaleo,

            Yes, you've got my meaning exactly. I see a number of steel plate disks, which would interest me not at all because they'd turn a quick responding induction hob into a molasses-slow radiant one, exactly what I'm trying to move away from. Perhaps a thin CI plate?

            Or, buy a really thin disk bottom pan and cut the base out? That might help with OP's problem. And spawn a whole new product!

            1. re: DuffyH

              Hi, Duffy: "...which would interest me not at all because they'd turn a quick responding induction hob into a molasses-slow radiant one."

              Well, IMO that's a bit of an exaggeration. Remember that you need to take the pan into account as well. For instance, it's debatable whether a CI pan on induction would be as downwardly responsive as a copper pan sitting on a coverter disk.

              And consider too that a disk, sitting atop the glass, is going to dissipate heat faster than will a radiant coil hidden under the glass.

              As you suggest, a thin cast plate should work well. In all cases with all hobs, the fastest downward responsiveness is obtained by moving the pan, ideally a very conductive one, off the hob.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

        2. re: kaleokahu

          And a converter disk reduces the efficiency of induction cooking.

          1. re: Caroline1

            Hi, Car:

            Why yes it does, although AFAIK, no one has quantified this reduction. It is certainly *not* comparable to replacing compact flourescents with incandescent lightbulbs.

            I know you have issues with your power rates and company, but for most people electricity use in cooking is a very small share of their cost. A small increase or reduction in a already-very small amount is a very, very small number.

            Aloha,
            Kaleo

            1. re: kaleokahu

              Agree. Power use isn't even on my radar. THE reason I'm changing is responsiveness. Period. That I'm also gaining a slightly cooler kitchen is icing on the cake.

              1. re: kaleokahu

                Ooooops! Oooops! Ooooops! I had a very long and very information packed response to this when my browser decided to shut down the page and I lost it. I won't repeat the list of swear words I found at my command when that happened! But I'll try to reconstruct some of the information cogently. Rewrites are NEVER as good as the originals!!!! Ask any professional writer!

                Okay... Induction cooking, converter plates, and pots and pans...!

                First off, some things that have to be understood about induction before we move on:

                1. Induction produces heat in cookware by exciting the IRON ATOMS in the cookware with a magnetic field produced by the induction unit's copper coils. RESULT: The higher the iron content of your cookware, the more responsive and faster responding your cookware will be. From direct experience, I have learned to gauge the temperature setting by the pan I use: An induction friendly stainless steel pan with an aluminum core will take higher heat and longer to attain temperature than a cast iron or DeBuyer Mineral B pan.

                2. In older induction designed cook units, which unfortunately means MOST of the American market, that technology ties the heat range that induction units can produce with the wattage it can draw. Thus, the highest heat range of “counter top” (aka “portable”) induction units draw 120v 1800watt power supply and deliver a heat range roughly the equivalent of most “small burners” on a radiant/coil electric range.

                Sooooo... It necessarily follows that if/when you use a “conversion plate” to sit on top of your induction burner that will transfer heat to a non-induction cooking vessel such as non-conductive stainless steel, a ceramic pot, a tagine, an all aluminum pan, you will NOT get the same level of response that you get when you cook with highly responsive maximum iron content pots and pans.

                The highest iron content in today's cookware occurs in DeBuyer Mineral B cookware, which is about as close to 100% iron content as is humanly possible. Next highest is cast iron, which isn't actually true iron because it is tradtionally (and still today) produced by the open hearth smelting method, and that allows oxygen to come in contact with the iron atoms, and even though it is only a small percentage of irong and oxygen that bonds, that limited bonding produces a “soft” steel. But these two metals do have the highest efficiency ability when it comes to cooking with induction.

                When I cook with “induction friendly” stainless steel pots and pans, I have to use a higher heat setting to get the same result I would get if I were using cast iron/Mineral B cookware. And if I use an adaption plate/trivet with non-induction friendly stainless steel cookware, the lag in efficiency is even greater.

                I HOPE this makes things clear!

                And for further clarification for you, Kaleo, I cook with induction because I am a cook first and foremost! What induction does for my electric bill is a very welcome and lovely side benefit, but my sole and primary reason for using induction is RESULTS IN COOKING...!!! '-) '-) '-)

                There's one other thing that should probably be clarified, and that is that ALL induction units available in the US today achieve an ILLUSION of “even heat transitions” you get with gas and radiant electric cooking by using “presets” that increase the radiation in increments to produce the impression that you have “smooth control.” The presets I've found on all induction units (UP UNTIL NOW!) have ranged from 10 to 19, with GE's induction cook tops having the 19, that has recently been increased to 20.

                But NOW there is a wonderful manufacturer who has kicked in with ONE HUNDRED presets so that they can more closely simulate the transition of gas or radiant electric in their commercial “front of the house” induction unit. They have also improved on the way the magnets are controlled as well. You can read about it here:

                http://vollrath.com/Vollrath/Press-Ro...

                Compared to a Max Burton counter top unit, it's pricey, BUT.... this puppy comes closest to giving the infinite control you get with a gas or electric range! Hooray!

                There is SO VERY MUCH being developed and refined with induction cooking, including all metal induction in Japan (that they will not currently allow to be exported), as well as “full surface” cook tops that allow the cook to move pans around all over the cooktop and the heat” will follow the pan! Soooooo... My personal decision is to stay with good solid individual units for the time being, and not waste money re-cutting my granite counter tops until a really great super-duper cook top is available. At age 80, I may not live to see it, but who knows?

                But if price and budget were of no consequence, I would replace my whole black granite island home to my cook top and install INDIVIDUAL built-in units similar to the Vollrath unit across the cooking side of the island, but aligned so they are ALL “front of the stove” burners! No more reaching across hot boiling pots to stir another hot boiling pot!

                But first and foremost, I am an iconoclast and a firm believer that a “stove” does not have to LOOK like a stove. It just has to perform like one! And I do LOVE me some induction...!!!

                And while I'm talking about fun applications of induction, do you know you can get induction units that install UNDER your granite (or other heat proof) counter tops that perform like a hot plate, but you just have to remember where they are when you're putting out party trays or casseroles of hot food for your buffet line... Spiffy!!! '-)

                1. re: Caroline1

                  Hi, Car:

                  I would never insinuate that you are not a real cook. Having had that insinuation hurled at me (usually when facts disfavorable to induction are presented), it's not pono.

                  Yes, of course induction appliances are limited by their maximum wattage. In assessing converter disks, I'm not sure how germane that fact is, because lack of power is not one of induction's shortcomings. IOW, other than in a boiling race, I think there will be no shortage of power even with a disk. This is especially so with the $$-$$$, 220V/40A units, and those with a boost feature. The practical issue is really how you figure out settings for differentially-efficient pans.

                  When you say "Induction produces heat in cookware by exciting the IRON ATOMS in the cookware...", this is true, but a bit of an oversimplification. We can say the 24KHz frequency used in today's American appliances can only induce heat sufficient for cooking in pans made of or containing ferritic metals because the skin effect (a function of frequency, permeability and conductivity) of other materials, including copper, aluminum and non-magnetic steels, is too thin. But if you could make a copper pan that was 1/56th of a mm thick, your 24KHz hob would heat it.

                  Merry Christmas,
                  Kaleo

                  1. re: kaleokahu

                    ONE question...! Do you personally cook on induction, and if so, how often? The physics of cooking with induction does NOT directly equate with the physics of cooking over direct heat.

                    1. re: Caroline1

                      Hi, Car:

                      Yes, I personally cook on induction, and yes, the main physical principle is different than from that of putting your cooking vessel on a different kind of hob. I see nothing wrong with the principle, but I (I, as in "just me" and IMO) find it soulless.

                      I still have the Thermoclad frypan W-S gave me to evaluate, some cast iron and carbon steel, and my Pressure Magic pressure cooker/fryer. They and my canner still get some use on my Aroma. But with more rewarding (again, just my opinion) cooking modalities and wares at hand, I cook the less on induction than my other hobs. If I had a catering business where I had to cook on location, I'd use it more.

                      I can see it coming, it might as well come from you, Ipo: "You just don't cook enough on induction to appreciate/understand it!"

                      Aloha,
                      Kaleo

                      1. re: kaleokahu

                        Hey Kaleo,

                        IMO it's the cook who puts the soul into the food, no matter if it comes off a stick over a fire or out of a pan over induction.

                        I look at it like painting. Whether the artist uses a sable brush or an air brush, it's still his eye, his hand, his imagination and his soul that produce the painting. The brush is just part of a set of tools at his command.

                        Mele Kalikimaka,
                        Duffy

                        1. re: DuffyH

                          Hi, Duffy:

                          Yeah, well, I get kick from Champagne, but none from induction or the MW.

                          (Strictly) For me, to borrow from your artist analogy, induction is more like music sampling or painting on a monitor. Totally respect it, but too many ghosts in the machine for me, too far from the roots.

                          Mele Kalikimaka a me Hau'oli Makahiki Hou to you and Dude,
                          Kaleo

                        2. re: kaleokahu

                          LOL! I am NOT making fun of you, but I find "soulless" a very unique way of coming to grips with the differences between induction and ALL OTHER cooking methods! You're a WORD WIZARD...!!!!

                          Induction is a cooking force that has soooooo much potential, but in today's political climate there is so much of the applied physics problem solving in this technology that is not being shared across the board. SOME corporate protectionist policies are tighter than applied nuclear physics secrets! Anyway, maybe some time in the not too distant future even you will love induction because it will then let you use your wonderful copper pots to cook with...! Yay for "The Future!" But why is it that some "futures" never seem to become the "past"...???? <sigh>

                          1. re: Caroline1

                            Hi, Car:

                            My disaffection with induction appliances would not end with "all metal" becoming available, but that would be a major step forward. If I could, I'd smuggle you such a unit from Japan and deliver it by sleigh tonight!

                            My guess for its continued absence from the US (and European?) markets is--indirectly--consumer safety concerns and certifications. The detection and other electronics overlay is already daunting. Working out the bugs in the all-metal (different frequency, etc.) to UL's, regulators' and insurers' safety standards might be viewed as a bridge too far, at least until induction *really* takes off in the US market.

                            There might also be a shrewd market caluculus at work: If induction is only 10% of the US market, and 90+ percent of those who have it are perfectly happy with their clad and cast iron, truly we are few who would clamor for all-metal appliances.

                            I'll make some calls to the Yakuza for you. If Santa is missing a little finger joint, you'll know how you got it...

                            Aloha,
                            Kaleo

                    2. re: Caroline1

                      Caro,

                      <At age 80, I may not live to see it, but who knows?>

                      You don't type a day over 60! :)

                      I've been in lust with individual counter tile induction plates since the early '80's, when I saw them at the Del Mar Fair. Sweet! I want me a warming buffet, too.

                      Merry Christmas

              2. Adding to what Kaleo said, you can have induction disks made for you at a metal shop if the retail versions (such as the Max Burton version) are too small for the big burner or otherwise do not suit your fancy. When you do that, however, you are basically converting your large burner from induction to radiant, kind of like the solid-top burners that were somewhere between coil burners and glasstop radiant burners. Put a smaller pot on the disk and the disk will be radiating a lot of heat out of the areas not covered by your small pan, just as would occur with small pots on standard coil and radiant burners.

                For griddles spanning two burners, there are choices other than cast iron. Chef King makes one that is 14" x 23" which has been the subject of favorable comment over on gardenweb. The Chef King is carbon steel, so it requires seasoning but is not as heavy as cast iron griddles. It has handles that project upwards, too, which makes it easier to grab and move than a lot of cast-iron griddles (which are basically big flat plates with holes in the ends for handles.) The Chef Kings do not have ridged bases on the side opposite the griddle, so less worry about scratching the ceramic surface of the induction cooktop. (Also, with the temps you would use for things like pancakes, you could place parchment or paper towels or newspaper over the burners to protect the surface. If you want to use a gridele for teppan-yaki style cooking, the temps are probably too high for the "paper" trick.)

                IIRC, Chef-King prices range from about $60 to $110, varying by vendor. Dvorson's has it for $70, I think. There was also a slightly smaller version, 12" x 20," which is around $50.

                BUT . . . there's always a "but" isn't there? . . . when spanning/bridging induction burners, both burners have to be in the same zone and not all makers or models allow this. Read your cooktop's manual because some of them explicitly forbid burner-spanning. Others may allow it but have burners positioned in a layout that simply does not work for spanning. Of course, there are some induction cooktops (LG comes to mind) that are actually set up for griddles and have bridging elements. A couple of Samsung's freestanding induction ranges also have this kind of bridging element on the cooktop.

                1 Reply
                1. re: JWVideo

                  Look, if you just want a "trivet" that works well and transfers heat efficiently on an induction burner, no reason to pay fifty to a hundred-plus bucks for one. Just use a large cast iron skillet, and put your sauce pan in the skillet! If you want to damp down any warping possibilities, use a dedicated cast iron skillet, put a couple of chopsticks or whatever in the bottom with about an inch or so of water and place your saucepan on that. It will give you very even heat distribution for your non-induction cook ware. The cast iron pan MAY be subject to rust, but a good oiling after every use this way should head that off easily.

                2. Why wouldn't a plain steel griddle suffice?

                  http://www.dvorsons.com/chefking/Grid...

                  These were mentioned in earlier threads. You don't need a consensus, you just need one solution that works.

                  1. As for your large hob, get a large sauté pan. That's what it's for.

                    1. Whether you can use a large cast iron double sided grill/griddle combination successfully on your new induction cook top depends entirely on how the "burners" on your cook top are laid out. *IF* you can place the griddle in the standard manner with which it would bridge two burners on either a gas or radiant electric cook top, then you should have no problem. But if one "burner" is much lower wattage than the adjacent one on your induction cooktop, you will have high heat on one end of the grill and lower heat on the other. There is SOME bridging, but not enough to make the grill temperature equal on its full surface. I compensate by using the lower heat half as a warming station, or to toast hamburger buns while grilling the burgers. I find much greater convenience with having both the huge double sided cover-half-the-cooktop griddle/grill AND a square cast iron "frying pan grill" that has the raised grilling ridges across the bottom. That gives me the best of both worlds!

                      As you gain experience with induction cooking, you will find that cast iron is one of the most responsive types of cookware you can use on induction. Well, cast iron cookware is only slightly outdone by DeBuyer's Mineral B cookware, which is pure iron. Traditional "cast iron" is really a soft steel because it is produced by open hearth smelting, and that allows some oxygen to bond with some iron atoms in the process, this producing a "soft steel." But a magnet will stick to it, no sweat! '-)

                      As for your problem with the burner turning off when you use large pans, when you cook with induction you cannot adjust the heat in a pan by sliding it to a position where it doesn't cover the whole burner the way you can with radiant heat (gas or electric). I'm not saying that is what you do, but I am saying it might be a possibility based on the problem you're having.

                      Enjoy your new induction cooktop! It will keep amazing you for years to come!

                      29 Replies
                      1. re: Caroline1

                        <But if one "burner" is much lower wattage than the adjacent one on your induction cooktop, you will have high heat on one end of the grill and lower heat on the other>

                        Which can be awesome for a grilling setup, with hotter and cooler zones. So nice.

                        1. re: Caroline1

                          Cast iron is about 98% iron; the main other ingredient is carbon. Cast iron pans are heavy and thick because that's the easiest way to produce durable pans from this hard, but brittle material.

                          If most of the carbon is worked out the iron (as by blacksmith hammering), the result is much more ductile, but soft material, wrought iron. Steel is a compromise, with a carefully controlled carbon level, about .5%. This is widely produced by steel mills in plate form, which can be easily shaped into pans like DeBuyer's.

                          My guess is that pan thickness is a more significant difference than the carbon content when talking about induction response. Pan diameter relative to the induction coil is also important.

                          A while back I timed boiling water in various pots on my MaxBurton. The fastest was a stainless steel mixing bowl with a small flat base (a nonmagnetic one at that).

                          For me, heat distribution and response at low power settings are more important. Hence I mostly use induction-ready cast aluminum and disk bottom stainless steel. I also use cheap enameled steel if I just need to boil a bit of water.

                          1. re: paulj

                            I also have a Max Burton, but your results are different from mine.

                            1. re: Caroline1

                              I understand the Fagor is much better than the Max Burton.

                              1. re: c oliver

                                My personal criteria for "much better" is how many presets a unit has and its maximum temperature. Fagor only has 7 presets. Max Burton has ten. Fagor lists its maximum temperature as 430 degrees, Max Burton lists theirs as 450 degrees. That makes the Max Burton "MUCH better" in my book! '-)

                                1. re: Caroline1

                                  I have a CH-friend who has spent her career in the kitchen/cooking arena and is one of the best home cooks I know of. She's the one who stated a preference for the Fagor. I used a Max Burton when our house was being gutted and didn't care much for it. My induction range had spoiled me I suppose.

                                  1. re: c oliver

                                    And Fagor is undoubtedly her personal preference. Obviously her preferences and mine are different. I'm not defending mine. I'm just stating what it is, and I gave the reasons for it: Range of heat and number of preset steps involved to provide the illusion of infinite heat control. MY opinion! I feel no need to match my opinions with those of others.

                                    1. re: Caroline1

                                      And my Max Burton was subpar. But, again, I've been using an induction cooktop for several years, every day, so my criteria are undoubtedly higher than some.

                                      1. re: c oliver

                                        "Max Burton" and "General Motors" have a great deal in common. Neither makes just one model.

                                        1. re: Caroline1

                                          And since I use a Samsung, I get what I want. I have two homes and bought the exact same range for the second one when we remodeled. But, hey, this is way off what the OP is asking about.

                                        2. re: c oliver

                                          ...and indubitably lower than some.

                                          1. re: kaleokahu

                                            Yup. My induction criteria are obviously higher than yours (and Caroline's) but lower than the lucky ones who have this Thermador jewel:

                                            http://www.uakc.com/CIT36XKB.html?pro...

                                            1. re: c oliver

                                              An alternate explanation is that we who do not Samsung have yet to have our criteria met.

                                          2. re: c oliver

                                            I'll just tack this on. New Year's dinner consisted of more large pots than I could comfortably fit on my cooktop so got the Max Burton (model # 6000) out and used it. The responsiveness was alright but what I didn't like - actually quite DISliked was that all the heat seemed to be coming from the smaller ring even though the pot was quite large. It wasn't a deal breaker for me for that meal but if I had been making a buying decision on induction this would have sent me on to a different technology. Just thought I'd pass this along.

                                            1. re: c oliver

                                              The #6000 has only one induction coil, which heats a ring about 6" in diameter, regardless of pan size. More expensive stovetops use several concentric coils (per burner) with the possibility of adjust their use based on pan size.

                                              1. re: paulj

                                                Good for others to know. Since I have been using an induction range for several years it's moot for me. It's funny that they have the smaller and the larger rings marked on the cooktop.

                                                1. re: c oliver

                                                  The rings just help center the pot; they don't define the coil area.

                                                  1. re: paulj

                                                    Hi, Paul:

                                                    The manual suggests that, but usually these circles also purport to define the minimum and maximum pot sizes. I'm curious... Is the smaller circle 4" in diameter?

                                                    Aloha,
                                                    Kaleo

                                                    1. re: kaleokahu

                                                      Inner oval is 5.5 by 6; outer about 10 (and is partial). The pan I boil coffee water in fits inside the inner markings. The smallest 'pan' that works is a 4.5" dia mixing bowl. My moka pot is smaller, but wrong material. I have an ibrik buried somewhere that might be the right material but wrong diameter. I haven't tried it.

                                                      A pan with a 9" base in a good conductor (e.g. thick aluminum) works ok.

                                                      1. re: paulj

                                                        I was using a very large and deep frying pan so the only cooking was done in that small ring in the middle. But it was a saucy type thing so I just kept stirring regularly.

                                                    2. re: paulj

                                                      Well, on my cooktop they certainly do but, again as I said, I just pass this along so that people won't try to compare the Max Burton 6000 to a full cooktop.

                                                      1. re: c oliver

                                                        My new range arrives tomorrow, yay! It's amazingly fast delivery, as I ordered it on the 28th.

                                                        1. re: DuffyH

                                                          That is SO exciting! What do you plan to cook first? Well, I guess we all start with boiling water :) Keep us posted please.

                                                          1. re: c oliver

                                                            OMG, this is too funny. Already scheduled is split pea soup, in the slow cooker. Saturday is BBQ chicken. But sunday! Sunday is chicken tacos, so I'll be using a sauté pan on it. :)

                                                            Eggs! I fry an egg almost every morning. That will likely be it's first test. Right after I boil some water. ;)

                                                            1. re: DuffyH

                                                              I especially like frying eggs on it because of the responsiveness. I can deliberately get it going pretty hot and then way down immediately. Yesterday I had all four burners going plus the aforementioned hot plate. Imagine how nice that's going to be in the summer.

                                                              1. re: c oliver

                                                                Eggs will be a whole new thing. Currently, I heat the DB pan on 5 until it's sort of hot, enough to foam butter. Then the egg goes in and the heat gets immediately cranked down to 3 while I pick the pan up for a few seconds to cool it, then when I flip the egg, I turn the heat off and let it cook on the residual heat.

                                                                I was reheating some of my tomato sauce for pasta tonight and thought how well THAT would do, as opposed to the "1 minute, stir, repeat 2 more times" exercise I go through with my microwave. I'm pretty sure the new range will be faster than that.

                                                                1. re: DuffyH

                                                                  I was thinking about a somewhat typical breakfast for us of bacon and eggs. I start the bacon at about 8 (of course, everyone is different but from 8 I go to 9 then HI then Power boose). Once it starts cooking I reduce to 6 (or 5.5 if really thick like I have right now). When it's done, I reduce to SI (simmer), remove the bacon to a paper towel lined plate that's sitting RIGHT BESIDE the skillet and that goes into a warm oven. Then I turn it up to 8 again and drop in two eggs that were in one bowl. That higher heat starts setting them up right away so I can them use my spatula to divide them. Once that's done I'm down again to probably 4/4.5 til I'm through cooking. It's just so damned easy with the almost instantaneous responsiveness. Over Christmas we did a house exchange and they had what appeared to be a nice Wolf range. DROVE ME NUTS!!!! Nuts, do you hear??? :)

                                  2. re: paulj

                                    I just tried heating bare pans on the default 5 power setting, and measuring the temperature with an IR thermometer

                                    8" cast iron skillet - got up to 400deg after 1 minute; uneven heat distribution
                                    8" nonstick aluminum - a little slower in heating
                                    deBuyer carbon steel skillet, similar size base - up to 400 by 30 seconds
                                    enameled steel tapas pan - up to 400 by 15sec.

                                    I didn't try my 8" stainless steel, since it is more reflective and does not register well on the thermometer.

                                    1. re: paulj

                                      Hi, Paul: "My guess is that pan thickness is a more significant difference than the carbon content when talking about induction response."

                                      You may be right. It certainly is *a* significant factor. Your thin SS bowl may be champ as a result of the "skin effect" phenomenon. Induction appliances can melt aluminum foil (melting temperature 1221F), even though it contains no carbon or iron AT ALL. But try a regular aluminum pan, and ...*nothing*.

                                      The ideal for induction top cooking responsiveness would be a whisper-thin (yet strong and durable) aluminum or copper pan placed *into* a pixelated, vented, zoneless coil "bowl" like a wok burner. Unrealistic at the present time, although I expect someone will take a shot at an induction version of a Thermomix or Bimby.

                                      Aloha,
                                      Kaleo

                                  3. Let us know how it works out for you!

                                    1. Thanks to everyone for the input. Not only did I receive several suggestions for the griddle cookware I'm looking for but I've benefited from the ensuing discussion.
                                      Ed

                                      1. http://www.amazon.com/plate-allow-sto...
                                        Discussion about using an induction disk with small pot such as mocha pot.

                                        1. I have this, love it and it will last forever:

                                          http://cookware.lecreuset.com/cookwar...

                                          2 Replies
                                          1. re: bagnut

                                            I kinda lust after that but, whew, the price is high, isn't it?!?

                                            1. re: c oliver

                                              I've had mine for >15 years, purchased at a local independent cookware shop so I am sure it was priced less then, and that I paid below list price.

                                              That said, in general I am of the philosophy that when buying something I will use frequently, it's worth it to pay for quality.
                                              I've observed several bargain-lovers over the years, and over time they've paid a lot more to repeatedly replace heavily used items than had they invested in quality up front.

                                              However, if it's not something you will use a lot then for sure factor that into the value proposition.