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ISO almond baked goods recipes

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zackly Dec 17, 2013 07:33 AM

I have in my freezer about 4# of almonds, sliced and whole.I'd like to use them up in holiday baked goods. if possible I'd like to incorporate them into the dough or batter after pureeing them in a food processor,like almond paste. Any recipe suggestions? Thanks!

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    smtucker RE: zackly Dec 17, 2013 08:44 AM

    My two favorite almond treats are Almonds Florentine [I use the ottolenghi recipe] and Viennese Crescent Cookies, from the Joy of Cooking.

    The Florentines are gluten and dairy free so a great item for people with special diets. The cookies are just a holiday tradition in our house. I think my mother started to make them in the early 60's when the NYTimes published a recipe and article.

    1. e
      Erika L RE: zackly Dec 17, 2013 12:02 PM

      Be aware that grinding almonds will result in almond meal or almond flour. It won't give you almond paste--that's a combo of ground almonds plus some kind of sweetener such as sugar or honey and also sometimes a binder.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Erika L
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        nothingswrong RE: Erika L Dec 17, 2013 04:29 PM

        +1

        To answer the question, I came across these a while back and they look delicious: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/20...

        I made the dough as directed, but used chocolate batons from Guittard to make them into pain au chocolats. They were SUPER TASTY and easy, if you don't mind the whole yeast thing.

        Also, this isn't a baked good, but will use up some almonds: http://food52.com/blog/4684-anya-von-...

        I've been intrigued by the recipe for months now but keep forgetting to grab almonds at the grocery store.

      2. greygarious RE: zackly Dec 17, 2013 04:43 PM

        I buy Trader Joe's almond meal and sub it for a fourth to a third of the flour when I make ordinary cookies, quickbread batters (muffins, cupcakes), and dessert tart(let) shells. Unless you also add almond extract or amaretto, you won't have noticeable almond flavor in this type of thing, just a generic nutty hint to the finished product.

        Spiced nuts are a good way to use a lot of whole, raw almonds. Almonds are particularly suited to curried nuts.
        Sing out if you want the recipe.

        The solofoods.com and odense.com websites have lots of recipes for their almond pastes, filling, and marzipan that also call for using the nut in some form.

        Note: If you just whir nuts in the food processor, the oil will separate and you'll have almond butter. For almond meal/flour, put nuts and sugar into the machine and pulse until finely-textured, taking care to rest it a few times so the nuts don't heat up (which would make the mixture oily).

        1. d
          DowntownJosie RE: zackly Dec 17, 2013 04:47 PM

          http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2010/0...
          I have made this cake a couple of times and love it. The first time I followed the directions but did not like the chocolate filling so much so I replaced it with a conventional ganache(cream and chocolate
          )I also like the clementine cake from nigella Lawson.
          I second smtucker in
          Inking Ottolenghi's Florentines, they are wonderful.

          1. Ttrockwood RE: zackly Dec 17, 2013 06:36 PM

            Banana bread made with almond meal is really amazing, as mentioned previously pulse the almonds to create almond meal. This simple recipe was great:
            http://m.justapinch.com/recipes/bread...

            1. r
              rockycat RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 05:17 AM

              If you're going to make your own almond meal it's a good idea to put some of the sugar from the recipe in the processor with the almonds. That will help keep you from turning the almond meal into almond butter.

              1 Reply
              1. re: rockycat
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                pine time RE: rockycat Dec 18, 2013 09:47 AM

                I sometimes put a few spoonsful of the regular flour along with the almonds, for the same reason.

              2. Pia RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 07:22 AM

                Rainbow cookies! Also known as seven-layer bars. Thin layers of almond cake, traditionally colored with food coloring, layered with raspberry or apricot jam and covered with chocolate. Epicurious has a good recipe.

                Also, you could make mini-almond tart crusts and fill them with lemon curd or pears.

                1 Reply
                1. re: Pia
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                  TracyKaplan RE: Pia Dec 18, 2013 11:17 AM

                  Oh I second making rainbow cookies. We made our own using this recipe from Smitten Kitchen http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/1...

                  They were very quickly eaten after we took this picture!

                   
                2. m
                  momnivore RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 11:23 AM

                  One of my all time favorite cakes is Nigella's Clementine Cake - http://www.nigella.com/recipes/view/c...
                  There are lots of discussions on CH about it if you do a search. It may not be for everyone, but I LOVE it.

                  11 Replies
                  1. re: momnivore
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                    pine time RE: momnivore Dec 19, 2013 11:53 AM

                    Do you think Satsumas could be a good sub for Clementines? I might try a 1/2 recipe as a trial...

                    1. re: pine time
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                      momnivore RE: pine time Dec 19, 2013 11:55 AM

                      I don't see why not. I know people have also made this with meyer lemons when in season to great success.

                      1. re: momnivore
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                        pine time RE: momnivore Dec 19, 2013 12:36 PM

                        Terrific--my Meyer lemons are nearly reading for picking, so that's another option.

                    2. re: momnivore
                      herby RE: momnivore Dec 19, 2013 12:08 PM

                      It is really is Claudia Roden's cake - for some reason it really irks me that people say it is Nigella's. Sorry, just can't help myself :)

                      1. re: herby
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                        momnivore RE: herby Dec 19, 2013 12:31 PM

                        Sorry! I don't know it any other way - that's how I was introduced to it. Either way, I think it's pretty delicious!

                        1. re: momnivore
                          hotoynoodle RE: momnivore Dec 20, 2013 12:58 PM

                          i love this cake too.

                        2. re: herby
                          greygarious RE: herby Dec 21, 2013 04:58 PM

                          I can't resist pooping in the punch bowl here - there are those of us who despise this cake, whoever is guilty of creating it. To each his own; I just didn't want uninitiates to think it's a surefire hit. I made it with Meyer lemons. Hated the texture, and the flavor that is created by cooking the whole fruit. Even my dogs wouldn't eat it.

                          1. re: greygarious
                            hotoynoodle RE: greygarious Dec 21, 2013 11:00 PM

                            the links offered show plenty of differing opinions.

                            why are you giving your dogs cake? seriously?

                          2. re: herby
                            paulj RE: herby Dec 22, 2013 07:36 PM

                            http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2009/0...
                            Smitten Kitchen's attempt at this recipe

                            1. re: herby
                              paulj RE: herby Dec 22, 2013 07:49 PM

                              In Roden's original Book of Middle Eastern Food, it is an Orange and Almond Cake, p413. Same method (boiling the oranges, pulp, add eggs and ground almonds, bake. It's the first recipe in the Sephardic Cakes chapter. With almonds it is (according to Roden) suitable for Passover.

                              http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/or...
                              http://www.jamesbeard.org/recipes/ora...

                              A good recipe if you want to join the Historic foods trend. :)

                              1. re: paulj
                                paulj RE: paulj Dec 25, 2013 10:03 AM

                                I made Roden's cake for Christmas Eve. We all liked it. Good orange flavor, with just a hint of the rind bitterness. Moist, denser than ordinary cake, but still pleasant. It complemented a cheese cake that others had brought.

                                I cooked 2 large naval oranges in the pressure cooker. First for half an hour, and then because they didn't seem soft enough, another half. I pureed them in the food mill (coarse disk). Mixed in ground nuts (TJ, 1c almond meal, 1/2c cashew) and 1c sugar. I put this mixture in the fridge overnight. The next morning I beat 5 jumbo eggs with the immersion blender, and then worked in the orange nut mixture (along with 1 tsp baking powder). And baked it in a spring form pan.

                          3. kitchengardengal RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 07:07 PM

                            http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/11534/...

                            Scandinavian Almond Bars from Allrecipes.com are one of my favorite cookies.
                            I don't do the icing on them, and I bake them a little longer because I like them golden and crispy.

                            1. MidwesternerTT RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 08:39 PM

                              Zackly - The whole ones are lovely as sugar-cinnamon-spiced baked "candied" nuts. They get very tender, easier to eat as snacks.

                              1. Emme RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 10:49 PM

                                crackers--

                                338 g almond flour (~3 cups)
                                1 - 1 ½ tsp kosher salt
                                2 tbsp oil of choice
                                2 eggs
                                herbs, roasted garlic bits, onion powder, various toppings, etc

                                combine ingredients except for toppings. roll out to ⅛ inch on two baking sheets and cut/score into desired shapes. sprinkle with toppings of choice, lightly pressing down. bake at 350 F for 10-12 minutes.

                                1. paulj RE: zackly Dec 18, 2013 10:58 PM

                                  The most traditional biscotti recipe uses a generous amount of whole almonds.

                                  3 Replies
                                  1. re: paulj
                                    herby RE: paulj Dec 19, 2013 12:12 PM

                                    Do you have a favourite? There are so many biscotti recipes out there and I just want to make a traditional one, maybe dip one end into chocolate but no more than that.

                                    1. re: herby
                                      Emme RE: herby Dec 20, 2013 06:44 PM

                                      this one is very traditional… http://www.italian-dessert-recipes.co...
                                      it's similar to one i use, though i will admit, i often sub some of the flour with almond flour as well, for an increased almond-y-ness

                                      1. re: herby
                                        paulj RE: herby Dec 20, 2013 10:28 PM

                                        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/923083

                                    2. LA Buckeye Fan RE: zackly Dec 19, 2013 01:03 PM

                                      Not really a "baked good," but a favorite almond dessert. Almond Cannoli Pie. Crust is graham cracker with toasted almonds blended in. Filling is ricotta cheese, chocolate chips, almond extract, sugar and toasted almond slivers. Chill for one hour.

                                      1. prima RE: zackly Dec 20, 2013 12:12 PM

                                        Kourabiedes (the Greek equivalent to Kipferl, the Viennese crescent cookie) or Linzer cookies (which can be made with almonds or hazelnuts).
                                        Could also be used to make almond bark or English toffee.

                                        1. z
                                          zackly RE: zackly Dec 21, 2013 10:24 AM

                                          Ok I have several sticks of sweet butter softening @ room temperature & I want to bake Christmas cookies later this afternoon using both all purpose flour & almond meal flour that I'm going to make in a food processor. Most of the recipes I find online are for wheat flourless, gluten free cookies. I have both sliced almonds that are white and un-blanched (skin-on) whole almonds. Is one type better than the other for this application? Do I need to toast the sliced almonds first? I prefer not to. I am hoping to make a large batch of dough that I roll into logs and refrigerate or freeze. Any recipes or tips? Thanks!

                                          1 Reply
                                          1. re: zackly
                                            hotoynoodle RE: zackly Dec 21, 2013 03:37 PM

                                            the skin-on will make for a more rustic cookie, which i often prefer.

                                            the recipe from kristen king right below is wonderful too and dead easy.

                                          2. Thanks4Food RE: zackly Dec 21, 2013 10:37 AM

                                            I found this recipe for Kristen King's almond squares on Chowhound and have made them to rave reviews many times: http://www.examiner.com/article/almon.... Chocolate chips are a popular addition, but I like them plain myself.

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