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Lower fat creamy/ cream based soup recipes needed

free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 12:49 AM

I made a good broccoli cheddar soup Monday night for dinner and discovered I hit on the perfect lunch for myself. It was cheap, (came out to about $0.70/serving), filling, easy to reheat and easy on the to digest. It really surprised me as I am not a cream of whatever soup person. I have a plethora of recipes for all other types of soups except for cream based soups. I'd love to hear about some other good yet healthy creamy or soups .
I am also interested in alternatives to cream/milk. I make a cauliflower soup that is very creamy yet it only uses stock as the base.

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    pine time RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 07:51 AM

    When I'm dieting, I'll use fat free evaporated milk for at least part of the milk/cream. Maybe my tastebuds are dead, or all the spices I use disguise it, but I don't see that much difference.

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      escondido123 RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 08:38 AM

      I make a number of vegetable-based soups -- curried cauliflower or butternut squash, celariac & potato, white bean & kale -- that become creamy if you hit them with the immersion blender. I usually serve them with a dollop of no-fat Greek yogurt that gets swirled in as you eat.

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        mwk RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 08:51 AM

        Curried Carrot and Parsnip soup. It has a nice creamy texture just by pureeing it without any cream. If you want to add some greek yogurt, that adds a nice tang to compliment the curry flavors.

        Another trick I learned from a cookbook a while ago was to add some rice or other starch to the soup to give it a smoother texture when pureed.

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          julesrules RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 08:56 AM

          You know the trick to only puree some of your (veggie, bean, whatever) soup so that the base is thicker and creamier?
          I find even a little cream goes a long way. Like a tablespoon per serving. So if a recipe calls for adding cream at the end to enrich it, you can try reducing (even eliminating) it. Not so sure how flour-thickened soups, bisques etc fare with reduced cream because I don't make those.
          Coconut milk is also good in spicy pureed soups (Thai-style squash, ginger cauliflower). Used to do soy milk in place of cream for a vegan roommate. It still adds richness and kind of mellows the flavours.

          1. Ttrockwood RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 07:54 PM

            A puree of white beans is a great way to add a thickness and creamy mouthfeel, adjust the salt in the soup so it doesn't get bland.
            A tip from a professional cook friend convinced me to try dehydrated potato flakes as a way to add thickness and a creamy mouthfeel to soups- works great!!
            Cashew cream is really amazing- exactly like sour cream. Soak raw cashews a few hours or overnight, drain, then puree with a splash of water until it looks like and is as smooth as sour cream. I use a glob ontop as serving, or stir in at the end when soup is done cooking.
            The lite canned coconut milk is great with a lentil veg soup or a curry.

            I recently made this one (but hot) and just left out the tomatoes cucumber from the topping, it was really creamy
            http://www.nytimes.com/recipes/101475...

            1 Reply
            1. re: Ttrockwood
              free sample addict aka Tracy L RE: Ttrockwood Dec 12, 2013 08:07 PM

              I used potato flakes to thicken the broccoli soup. I was really able to adjust the thickness.

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              janeh RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 08:00 PM

              Anthony Bourdain's mushroom soup is creamy and delicious without any cream. I used more mushrooms - a mixture of button, crimini and a few fresh shitakis - and omitted (forgot) the sherry.

              http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

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                hankstramm RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 12, 2013 08:57 PM

                This is awesome. Got it from OakJoan years ago on here:
                Porcini Celery Root Soup

                Serves 6
                a large handful of dried porcini, soaked for about 30 minutes in 1 and 3/4 cup hot water.
                4 Tbsp olive oil
                2 diced medium onions
                2 diced celery sticks
                1 carrot diced
                2 crushed garlic cloves
                1 tsp salt
                pinch of pepper
                1 ground small red chili (I used chili flakes)
                1 lb. 2 oz. celeriac (This seems a bit finicky to me. I just got a good sized celeriac and didn't weigh it.)m diced
                About 4 cups of vegetable stock (She also recs Marigold Bouillon Powder, which I didn't use.) I have used veg stock, water flavored with some of that paste called Better than Mushrooms and chicken stock - all are good). She says water alone is okay, too, but I don't think so....even tho I've never tried it.
                Strain porcini and reserve soaking liquid. BE SURE TO STRAIN THE LIQUID THROUGH A FINE SEIVE OR YOU'LL GET GRITTY STUFF IN THE SOUP.
                Saute the onion, garlic, celery and carrot and chili flakes (or ground chili) over low heat until the veg soften and start to color.
                Add the celeriac and porcini, the strained soaking liquid and stock or water to cover the veg by about 1 1/4 inches above the veg.
                Simmer for 40 minutes and then puree in a blender or food processor.
                I think it's great served with a dollop of plain yoghurt in each bowl, but you can pass the yoghurt so folks can take what they want.
                Good luck. I have made this at least 5 times and it has always been very very good.

                1. Kajikit RE: free sample addict aka Tracy L Dec 13, 2013 12:32 PM

                  I can't tolerate much milk fat, so I never cook with cream - I use low-fat milk and add cornstarch as a thickener at the end of the recipe.

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