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Seabass-- best way to cook?

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I have 4 ounce seabass steaks. What is the best way to cook them? I love seabass and am happy that my market had these. How to prepare?

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  1. when you say seabass, do you mean chilean seabass? or something else?

    are they thick pieces or thin? you can pan-cook or bake to be on the safe side of not over-cooking. 4 ounces is a small piece.

    1. Pan fry, poach or steam.....top with your favorite seasonings, condiments or compound butter.

      My favorite is Julienne Scallions and Gingers....drizzled with Soy Sauce.

      1. Outside on the grill.
        dsgirl, are you buying seabass for less than $20. per lb? If so, where?

        8 Replies
        1. re: Gail

          not everybody has outside or a grill :)

          1. re: hotoynoodle

            I recommend you 'poach' the sea bass, or any fresh fish VERY slowly in coconut oil or a 'light' olive oil. just enough to cover the fillets.
            Gently slide the fish into the oil which is at 200F skin side down. You do not 'turn' the fish. Leave it alone.
            Watch the color of the fish at the edges. When that color has reached the middle of the fish it's perfectly cooked. This can take some time depending on the thickness of the fillet/s. Carefully remove to paper towels and serve leaving the skin on to maintain form of the fillet as it's being eaten. Lemon wedges on the side.
            This way you will get to actually taste the fish.
            IMO by the time the interior of a fresh piece of fish is cooked perfectly inside the exterior is overcooked when frying or grilling b/c many cooks use too high a heat thereby converting expensive protein into rubber bands.

            1. re: Puffin3

              i do like fattier fish, like salmon, poached in oil, but it's not my preferred technique for mild white fish. ymmv.

              1. re: hotoynoodle

                many cooks use too high a heat thereby converting expensive protein into rubber bands.
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                crisping skin, and or putting on a crust on one side is an acceptable way to present fish....Poaching and storing fish in Olive Oil is as well, but the cost to do so is prohibitive, especially for a couple of small 4 oz steaks

                1. re: fourunder

                  The OP asked what the "best way" is to cook sea bass....not the most economical. Had that been the case I would have suggested the fish be wrapped in foil and set on a car exhaust manifold. Using OO for poaching fresh fish isn't that costly if you reuse it a few times IMO.
                  Slice it anyway anyone wants to. Once any protein strand is heated above 212 F it turns into rubber bands. It's science.

                  1. re: Puffin3

                    Once any protein strand is heated above 212 F it turns into rubber bands. It's science.

                    You're correct, it is science and poaching in water does not heat the protein above 212 either. even if olive or coconut oil imparts flavor into the flesh of the fish....it would not be best if you did not particularly care for olive oil or coconut oil now would it?

            2. re: hotoynoodle

              hoytoynoodle, OP asked for best method. In my opinion, that is the best method.

            3. re: Gail

              Gail
              They had seabass steaks on sale at our local market but it was $5. for a 4 ounce steak. Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Too cold here in CA right now to be out on the grill (although we usually grill year round) so we just cooked them in the pan.

            4. In my opinion, given that you have a seabass steak, I prefer pan fry.

              If you have a whole seabass, then I would say steam.

              1. 4 ounces?

                That's not a steak, unless you are a Lilliputian.

                If you're any bigger than a hobbit, those are filets.

                In any event, I suggest you pan-fry those filets.

                Another thought is to to take out a sheet of aluminum foil (about 10x10 should be enough for those humongous filets), then spread a layer of frozen spinach, then top the spinach with some chopped garlic, then lay those humongous filets over the bed of spinach and season the fish, generously, with salt, pepper, powdered ginger. Bake at 350F, uncovered, for about 15 minutes, then squeeze some fresh lime over the fish, and garnish with a good sprinkling (from up high) of good sea salt and a drizzle of EVOO before serving.

                1. You've had seabass (I assume you mean Patagonian toothfish), so you know they're rich, like a cheesecake of fishes. 4oz. per serving is plenty, IMHO. I recommend pan searing and then finishing in the oven at 350 or or 375, which means you should start with an oven-safe pan. (I prefer cast iron for this.)

                  Just salt them and then pepper them at the oven stage. Have some veggies and starch going to accompany. A bit of tartar sauce on the side. Don't let the fish go above 125 or so temperature. or medium firm.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Bada Bing

                    You are so right. Seabass is rich and a 4 ounce piece was perfect. I ate the leftovers today. Such great flavor! Thank you.

                  2. I like Asian preparations best, especially sweet (e.g., Vietnamese caramel) and umami flavors.