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What's your one kitchen secret ......

you do to "fool" your meal guests ? Or name several, don't matter.

For me it's making gravy. I don't bother with different kinds of gravy (peppercorn, mushroom, au jus, etc). At least for red meats and poultry, gravy is gravy, muahaha. If I don' have wine in the house then I won't deglaze pan/pot drippings and fonds.

I use "Better Than Bouillon"

http://www.superiortouch.com/retail/p...

.... as base dissolved in the correct amount of hot water, then dump whatever cooking fats & juices that were in the pan or pot that the protein was cooked in, finally add some (here it comes ....drum roll) generic OXO gravy mix to the whole concoction and bob's your uncle. Sometimes I'd add a pat of butter at the end and season it with ground pepper of course.

So far 90% of the time I fool my guests that it's totally homemade. And they actually love it.

What's yours ?

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  1. A dash of Magi sauce helps to amp up beef flavors too.

    1 Reply
    1. re: letsindulge

      Yes absolutely. It's rather salty, 'tho.

      1. Can't tell 'cause it's a secret! ;o)

        1 Reply
        1. Even though I render beef bones for my beef and barley soup, it is far improved by adding a can of bouillon. Why fight it?

          1. True confessions time! I use (gasp) Kitchen Bouquet in my gravy to give it a better color if I'm serving a small roast that hasn't cooked long enough to make the gravy brown.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Jessiet

              Dark soy sauce works in a pinch too.

            2. My basic gravy base is buttermilk, thickened with cornstarch or wondra.

              You can do a lot of things with this - pan sauce, curry gravy, mushroom or onion sauce, dill plus paprika are good, etc.

              1. First you make a roux...........

                1. Goya Sauzon and soy sauce

                  1. Brining all kinds of meats, except beef. Pork wildly benefits from a brine, as does lamb and fowl. Adjust mixture and time to the type/cut of meat. Pork tenderloins take only 1/2 hr. in a 1:4 mix, while a turkey can take overnight in the same mix. It really does make a good difference. To my taste, brined beef develops a texture I can't stand, so I don't .
                    Bob's your uncle, indeed! Love that British-ism.