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feedback on this one-pot dish?

Soop Nov 19, 2013 03:01 AM

I haven't made it yet, but I had in mind a chicken chasseur style one pot dish to make for work. Now that I've read some recipes, it's actually quite a bit different, but I'm wondering if anyone thinks this will be delicious, terrible, or any suggestions to make it more delicious.

I've got about 1.3kg of chicken breast, which I'm gonna dice, along with:
2-3 onions (coarse chopped)
200g bacon lardons
2 cans plum tomatoes
2 cans butter beans
about 100g closed cup mushrooms
3 carrots
2 courgettes (zuchinis)
100g fine green beans
1 can anchovies
And I think I have some thyme knocking about.

Does this sound alright? Not sure if it needs chicken stock or wine (don't think I have any in) for depth of flavour, or the anchovies will be enough.

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  1. monavano Nov 19, 2013 04:43 AM

    I'm feeling a coq au vin direction here with the mushrooms and lardon, which brings plenty of umami, so I don't think you need the anchovies.
    Red wine would be lovely.

    7 Replies
    1. re: monavano
      sunshine842 Nov 19, 2013 05:01 AM

      Yep...I'd leave the courgettes and green beans out, too. The rest is a pretty close imitation of cassoulet.

      1. re: sunshine842
        alkapal Nov 19, 2013 05:50 AM

        you didn't mean cassoulet, but chasseur, right?

        1. re: alkapal
          sunshine842 Nov 19, 2013 06:28 AM

          No, I meant Cassoulet. It's cassoulet-ISH, to be sure, and woud never be confused with the actual dish, but it's down that path with the butter beans and bacon and tomatoes.

          1. re: sunshine842
            Soop Nov 19, 2013 08:32 AM

            I do like cassoulet quite a lot, and that is where the butterbeans came from. It was kind of an impulse thing.

            *edit* Hi Alkapal!

            1. re: sunshine842
              Soop Nov 19, 2013 08:36 AM

              Thanks Alka! This is all for me O__O
              I think the vegetables stay, if only for a nutrition point of view. I'm not really fussed about authenticity, as long as it tastes ok. Chasseur was more the ... inspiration.

              Thining about it, some dried porcini would have perhaps been a better move, you're right. but I have them now anyway!

              Roger on the anchovies, and hey, you're the second person to mention lemon, maybe there's something in it!
              And I'll try the worcester, maybe some tabasco too

              1. re: sunshine842
                Soop Nov 19, 2013 08:38 AM

                Hi buddy! Long time, hope you're well :D

                Right, I hear you with the chovies, and I will try and source some wine/stock. Fingers crossed!

                And just in case I don't see everyone, have an excellent christmas too. I might have to pop back and see how everyone is planning out their xmas lunch, I've missed this place.

                1. re: Soop
                  sunshine842 Nov 19, 2013 09:14 AM

                  I think I'd be tempted to steam the vegies and have them alongside, rather than in the main dish, but it's your lunch, not mine!**

                  **meant entirely as an indicator of free will, and not at all to be construed as a yucking of someone else's yum.

        2. MidwesternerTT Nov 19, 2013 04:51 AM

          I'd use oregano or rosemary, since my tastebuds perceive thyme as musty/spoiled flavor.
          Are any of your co-workers avoiding pork / red meat? If so, you'll want to include a sign for your dish.

          3 Replies
          1. re: MidwesternerTT
            Soop Nov 19, 2013 08:28 AM

            Hahah, when I say "for work", it's all for me. I won't eat it all at once, but I will eat it all. Cheaper than sandwiches and much tastier!

            1. re: MidwesternerTT
              Soop Nov 19, 2013 08:30 AM

              Thanks! This is really helpful, I think I might have actually forgotten how quick courgettes take and thrown them in early.

              Any idea why tenderising the chicken keeps it juicy? I eat quite a lot.

              1. re: MidwesternerTT
                d
                DebinIndiana Nov 22, 2013 12:36 PM

                Are there others who agree on the flavor of thyme -- this is a great description of how it tastes to me.

              2. g
                GTM Nov 19, 2013 05:03 AM

                For all chciken breast, please do this first: on the whole breast, beat the meat up with the back of a cleaver or a meat paddle. Not pulverize, but enough. When the fibers are broken up somewhat, then cut int dice or make cutlets or cook as you wish. You will find that your chk. breask remains softer and much juicier than it were just chunked.

                If you were to cook up some of the bacon in a little olive oil or butter, to whatever degree you want, you would have a bit of fat. You might then wish to flour your chicken, pepper at least, maybe Wondra flour if you have [not in the UK!], and lightly brown the whole beaten floured breasts, and then dice. Add coarse chopped onions to the same pan you have sauteed the chicken [non reactive] sweat a bit, add the anchovies, melt them, deglaze with tomato liquid into pot, add crushed tomato, some of the fried bacom saving some for later, a stock cube if you feel you have to have one, after tasting. Add the veggies accordin to your taste for how soft you like them and your cooker's cooking nous. Thyme midway? A few dashes of hot sauce wakes up falvors. You cannot taste any heat, but it does something subliminal. Also, if you have some lemon and parsley, at the last minute before serving, a very, very fine mince of lemon zest and parsley often wakes up flavors, as does a squuee of lemon juice.

                1. alkapal Nov 19, 2013 05:58 AM

                  is this for a group lunch? it is a big batch.

                  i would drop the butter beans, zucchini, carrots and green beans. remember that chasseur is "hunter style" and those make me think "farmer style," or more of a farmhouse stew.

                  i'd chop the canned tomatoes with some bits larger.

                  i'd add a touch of cognac instead of wine. i'm not a fan of red wine with chicken, though i know there are many who are fans.

                  i'd use different kinds of mushrooms. i'd see if i could rehydrate some dried wild mushrooms for a while, then strain through muslin the soaking liquid to remove grit. use the liquid and the chopped mushrooms in along with the fresh mushrooms.

                  i like the anchovies but i think a whole can is a bit much; however, for that amount of meat maybe not. start with less.

                  (might try for a taste before serving: 1. a squirt of lemon (i know, i know); 2. a shot of worcestershire sauce; and/or 3. fresh chopped parsley on top).

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: alkapal
                    Ttrockwood Nov 19, 2013 08:57 PM

                    Funny, i was thinking keep the beans and either omit or use way less chicken....
                    I agree it sounds like a lot of anchovies

                  2. h
                    Harters Nov 19, 2013 06:16 AM

                    Well, it ain't chasseur but it sounds pretty much excellent to me, Soop. Unfortunately, I can't get down to the south west to join you for dinner.

                    I would cut down, or leave out, the anchovies as might be a bit too salty. And it certainly needs either stock or wine to boost the flavour of the sauce.

                    1. meatn3 Nov 19, 2013 08:53 AM

                      I'd add a little garlic and perhaps some celery, especially the leaves. If the carrots are big I'd decrease them so the dish isn't verging on sweet. Definitely decrease the anchovies!

                      Parsley, thyme or marjoram would work nicely.

                      1. r
                        Raffles Nov 19, 2013 09:11 AM

                        Yummie!
                        Perhaps boneless thighs would stew better than breast.
                        Herbs de Provence?
                        Bay leaf?
                        White wine or red..
                        Crusty loaf of bread?

                        1. FoodWacky Nov 19, 2013 11:00 PM

                          Sounds good, but I'd drop the anchovies. Have fun!

                          8 Replies
                          1. re: FoodWacky
                            Soop Nov 20, 2013 03:37 AM

                            Hi all! Well I couldn't find any stock or wine (my flatmates used up my quite large supply without replacing) but it ended up being pretty good. I did use the whole can of chovies, but seeing as the meal barely fit in the pot, it's not over powered.

                            I tried to use some arrowroot as well, but I'm going to have to look up how it works.

                            I also did use a clove of garlic, dried oregano, and I sliced the carrots diagonally, which is quite nice IMO.

                            Last thing; my comments are now in weird places, Swear it wasn't like this yesterday. Thanks for your help everyone!

                            1. re: Soop
                              h
                              Harters Nov 20, 2013 03:57 AM

                              You'd use arrowroot like you'd use cornflour, to thicken the stock. Dissolve it in a little water and just add it to the stew. Not sure if it has any advantages over cornflour.

                              1. re: Soop
                                g
                                GTM Nov 20, 2013 05:22 PM

                                Hi Soop,

                                Tell us how you liked the dish, and what you felt was lacking, and what were its best point! That way we too can learn from your adventures!!

                                If you are thickening with starch, different starches behave differently in acids, in heated gravies, and even in slow cooker types of situations. Cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca, arrowroot, Wondra flour, all give you different thickening power, mouthfeel and last for different times before losing their gel in hot gravies. You might like to look up kitchen chemistry books like Corriher. I think cornstarch loses thickening earliest, while potato and tapioca are a bit more lasting. Acids like tomato or wine that has not evaporated, in a closed crockpot, affects them in other ways.

                                A whole can of anchovies is about 3.5 oz, and you had 1.3 kg chicken plus a lot of beans, veggies, tomato, etc. Chicken breast needs all the help it can get, and 3.5 oz is not too much to my taste. Others have cringed, but they may be sensitive to anchovy!

                                1. re: GTM
                                  Soop Nov 21, 2013 04:10 AM

                                  Ah these cans were only 30g, I guess it's different over there. So we're talking about maybe 8-10 chovies.

                                  What I would do differently... Well the beans (both kinds) didn't go in.
                                  I did put the courgettes in a little too early, and they lost their consistency in some cases.
                                  Hmm, let me eat some more and remind myself.

                                  1. re: GTM
                                    Soop Nov 21, 2013 04:10 AM

                                    A tiny bit to wash out the tomato cans, but I think 2 cans of plum tomatoes was enough liquid.

                                    1. re: Soop
                                      alkapal Nov 21, 2013 07:30 AM

                                      were you happy with the boneless breasts? it would have been richer with bone-in thighs.

                                      depending in the cook time, and i suspect that was a decent while, i suspect the chicken pieces were rendered rather chewy and tasteless. white meat chicken should not cook long in any case.

                                      1. re: alkapal
                                        Soop Nov 22, 2013 04:23 AM

                                        it's actually really good. Not the *most* succulent, but I had it on a low simmer, and ate it the next day (and yesterday, and today) so it's had time to sit. So yeah, you could cut the pieces with a spoon.

                                        The pieces are about half a matchbox in size.

                                  2. re: Soop
                                    Ttrockwood Nov 20, 2013 06:48 PM

                                    Did you just use water instead of the stock or wine?

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