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how did you become a foodie?

i stumbled upon this board by accident and now I'm curious to try things like foie grass, cassoulet, and such.

the thing is, my friends are picky and only eat same 5 or 6 dishes in restaurants.

so I was curious about where to start exploring these fancy dishes. i don't have much to spend, maybe $30-$50 before drinks and tip.

thanks.

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  1. Great topic re: where to try dishes though I find your subject line a little misleading -- you want recs, not people's personal histories. This has little to do with being/not being a foodie per se...

    Are you OK dining alone at the bar?

    I might also make a list of what foods you wish to try: foie gras, oysters, lobster, truffles, poussin, etc. If you can list them all out, we can maybe recommend places that do them really well.

    Also are you thinking you'd sit at the bar and order 1 dish just to try it, or is $50 for a full meal?

    In general, in your price range, I'd definitely look at Louro, Momofuku Ssam, Pearl & Ash, Public, etc.

    1 Reply
    1. Good topic, but not all who are interested in food think of themselves as a "foodie." A good way to experiment without spending much is at a place which offers "small plates." A Spanish version of this is a "tapas bar." There are also "raw bars" and other forms of small plates. Counter seating is ideal for this type of food.

      Interesting food need be neither "fancy" nor expensive.

      1. I'd suggest the foie gras tasting at Paradou (8 Little West 12th St). If you book on Savored, you can get a 30% discount.

        1. Eating things like "foie grass [sic]" and "cassoulet" does not make one a foodie, nor does eating "fancy dishes."

          A foodie, for me at least, is more a state of mind (an intrepid culinary mentality, if you will) than simply have a running compendium of different foodstuffs one has put into their mouths.

          I think you become a "foodie" (whatever that may mean) by simply stepping out of your comfort zone to explore the different, unique and wonderful dining nooks and crannies this great city has to offer -- be it that new kebab cart on such and such intersection, or that Monkey Nipples dish made with pomegranate nectar at the latest restaurant in the Meatpacking District.

          1 Reply
          1. re: ipsedixit

            "I think you become a "foodie" (whatever that may mean) by simply stepping out of your comfort zone to explore the different, unique and wonderful dining nooks and crannies this great city has to offer -- be it that new kebab cart on such and such intersection, or that Monkey Nipples dish made with pomegranate nectar at the latest restaurant in the Meatpacking District."

            That sounds like exactly what the OP is trying to do. foie grass, cassoulet, and such look like they're just examples, not required items.

          2. Do lunch at Jean Georges and get the foie gras brûlée. Then try Benoit for the cassoulet. Both are the best versions in NYC and easily within your budget.

            2 Replies
            1. re: MrGrumpy

              I second that... the JG foie gras brulee is AMAZING!!

              1. re: silencespeak

                I agree JG foie gras is quite amazing. But for OP, a less expensive excellent seared foie gras can be had at Cercle Rouge.
                Greenwich Grill put foie gras back on their menu. It is a good dish there. OP may find other interesting dishes there too.
                Paradou as another CH'er suggested is a good choice for foie gras. They have the various foie gras tastings. WOW, 30% off on Savored, that's a great tip.