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Are There Strips for Testing Salt Content?

opinionatedchef Oct 16, 2013 08:14 PM

I have recently had to go to a low salt diet, which is not as miserable as i thought it would be. But one major problem i have is that I have a freezer full of delicious soups, stews, etc. that i made months ago but that i do not have sodium counts on. Kosher salt and tamari have long been my right hand men, so i am very hesitant to eat these foods i made. Am I crazy, or do there exist test strips for saline content of a liquid? Could I use those to derive salt content of the dishes i made? thx much.

  1. AnneInMpls Oct 16, 2013 10:15 PM

    Speaking as someone who has taking this journey 18 months ago.... I think you already have a general idea of the salt content of these soups and stews - at least, you know that they were made with much more salt than you use now.

    My advice: Instead of testing strips, use your knowledge of your old (high salt) self and your tastebuds. Take the high salt as a given and figure out how to use them while decreasing the salt per portion. Perhaps serve a half portion over plain steamed rice, or make another batch without salt and mix half-and-half. I've heard that potatoes can be used to fix a too-salty dish, so perhaps add a lot of cooked potatoes or serve over a baked potato. Or add more of the main ingredient (meat or vegetables or starch).

    You may already know this, but after a month or two of a low salt diet, your "old" food will taste too salty. And if you're not there yet, you don't want a high-salt blast to override all your hard work. But in my case, at least, a high(er) salt meal once a week isn't the end of the world - at least for my situation. In any case, I wish you the best of luck - it's worth it!

    1. c
      CKaty Oct 16, 2013 09:18 PM

      I have zero expertise on this, but by googling I found a "Digital Salt Meter with Thermometer", which per one website could be used to test salt content of food. It seems to retail for about 25 bucks. I would imagine you would need to do more research to see if it would meet your needs.

      1. g
        GH1618 Oct 16, 2013 09:17 PM

        You need a conductivity meter, I think.

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