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Greek cookbook/greek home cooking

Does anyone have a GREAT go-to Greek cookbook for me? I love, love love Greek food, Greek flavors, but it's the only cuisine I've never cooked. Recently bought "Three sisters Around the Greek Table", a much celebrated book, but cannot find anything in it to cook. Help, help.

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  1. My friend (from Sparti) gave me "The Complete Book of Greek Cooking: The Recipe Club of St. Paul's Orthodox Cathedral" as a starter book. It's pretty comprehensive.

    1. The Olive and the Caper by Susanna Hoffman. I have quite a few Greek cookbooks but this one is my favorite.

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      1. "The Complete Book of Greek Cooking: The Recipe Club of St. Paul's Greek Orthodox Cathedral" is a great resource. Easy Greek-American cookbook that has been revised many times.

        My favorite is "The Olive and the Caper" by Susanna Hoffman. The perspective of a non-Greek author keeps the recipes true to their origins. No "interpretations" here. Just Greek recipes observed by the author.

        Another Great Greek Cookbook is "How to Roast a Lamb" by Michael Psilakis. A true Greek Chef who's food is true to his mothers Greek recipes and a celebration of Greek Cuisine. A must in any cookbook collection.

        Good Greek recipes can also be found here:

        http://www.kalofagas.ca

        and here:

        http://www.kopiaste.org

        3 Replies
        1. re: Gastronomos

          Honestly, I would think it would be the opposite: the perspective of a Greek author would keep the recipes true to their origins. The perspective of a non-Greek author is problematic and inevitably leads to interpretations. It is unavoidable, as the non-Greek perspective labels all the recipes "Greek" regardless of their regional origins. When she observes a single cook, she is reporting their interpretation; if she observes a higher number of cooks and then formulates her own recipe derived from what she observed, that's *her* interpretation.

          1. re: reptilegrrl

            I would think the opposite as well. But all too often many of these recipe books, even those by Diane Kochilas, are interpretations of true recipes that the author may think are easier for a home cook to follow or, worse, lists ingredients that may be more readily available in some places.

            "The Complete Book of Greek Cooking: The Recipe Club of St. Paul's Greek Orthodox Cathedral" is a great resource. And one that allows a non-Greek or Philhelene to make Greek inspired dishes with Greek style recipes. I've had little success coaxing true Greek flavor from any of the recipes in that book. But for those looking to replicate a greek diner type/style recipe, this might help.

            "The Olive and the Caper" by Susanna Hoffman isn't the best book out there, it's just one of the best for true Greek recipes as she saw them made first hand. And, yes no regard to regional differences.

            For true Greek flavor. Really Great Greek food. As I wrote before, "How to Roast a Lamb" by Michael Psilakis. A true Greek Chef who's food is true to his mothers Greek recipes and a celebration of Greek Cuisine. A must in any cookbook collection.

            I've eaten in his restaurants when he was in the kitchen. If he isn't the best Greek chef in the US, he is the only one.

            1. re: Gastronomos

              oh, i'd forgotten about the olive and the caper. i loved that book, but i'm no greek food expert. i seem to recall it wove lovely stories of place with food, and had nice photos, as well.

        2. My favorite greek cookbooks are ones that I have picked up at church run greek festivals. But I can recommend a great site. http://www.dianekochilas.com/ and another I enjoy http://greekgourmand.blogspot.com/

          1. I love the website http://www.organicallycooked.com/ . A very smart Greek woman writing about how she cooks for her family.