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Do people's food choices/ preferences impact how attractive you find them?

As in the kind of dish they select on a date, whether they prefer spicy / sweet food or whatever

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  1. A bit. More so I'm very unattracted if a person is overly picky, in a closed minded type of way. Like not liking something without ever trying it.

    29 Replies
    1. re: youareabunny

      I second this. When I was in the dating pool, I also avoided vegetarians and vegans like the plague. These lifestyles don't make people less attractive to me, but I love to cook and share food (and meat!) WAY too much to partner up with someone who doesn't eat meat.

      1. re: biondanonima

        Yeah, but that is not because they are not attractive. There is still this vegan woman who I find to be very attractive. I just don't think anything can possibly happen between us. But it does not make her any less attractive to me.

          1. re: Motosport

            I have wondered ( but not a heck of a lot...and no, I won't Google it!)..........do Vegan mothers breast feed their children?

            1. re: FriedClamFanatic

              All the vegan mothers that I know did breastfeed their children, and no they did not feel it compromised their beliefs. Sadly there have been some famous cases of vegan parents who tried to feed their infants exclusively on nut milks, etc., with predictably disastrous results.

            2. re: Motosport

              But wait until you encounter a Level 5 Vegan. That will be the experience of your life.

              Hunt

              1. re: Bill Hunt

                They survive on air and yoga alone!!

                1. re: Motosport

                  "The claimed ability to survive without food (and sometimes without water as well) is called inedia, and those who attempt it are called “inediates” (among other things)."
                  http://news.discovery.com/human/psych...

                  Can you imagine the conversations with this person?
                  "Hey, wanna grab something to eat? I'm starving!"
                  "No thanks. I don't need to eat. I'm inediate."
                  "Yes. Yes you are."

                  1. re: seamunky

                    I really loved the "among other things," and all sorts of visions entered my pointed little head. Um-m-m-m...

                    Hunt

                  2. re: Motosport

                    That is all that is left - Um-m-m-m.

                    Hunt

              2. re: biondanonima

                I am a level -2 vegetarian since I eat eggs, dairy and seafood. Strangely enough I prefer my men to eat meat.

                Random memory: my freshman year of college, my roommate told me that her bf did not like fish because when you press a fork against it, the fish comes through the tines.

                ... the things people come up with.

                1. re: youareabunny

                  Sounds like he's using the fork incorrectly.

                  1. re: youareabunny

                    Where does the level-2 come from? I don't think I have heard of the levels of vegetarianism, just the types. I was ovo-lacto. I have friends who are vegan, ovo, and lacto. Would be interested to see how those line up with these levels.

                    I have to say I would not consider someone who eats seafood to be a vegetarian. I know that's a touchy subject, but to me it is animal flesh. That's sort of my basic test for vegetarianism--do you eat animal flesh.

                    I'm going out to dinner with a bunch of friends tonight and now hope no one orders fish. I fear I'll be watching all meal to see if fish comes up through the tines. Odd!

                    1. re: debbiel

                      Just playing off of bill hunt's level 5 vegan comment. Much easier/less clarification for me to refer to myself as vegetarian than pescatarian.

                      Now that I think about it, he applied the tine test to gauge what fish he would or would not eat. Sushi did not pass the tine test so he would not eat it.

                      He was a particular guy. Rearranged roomies wardrobe by style and color once. Just cuz he was bored

                      1. re: youareabunny

                        Ah...got it.

                        For me the fish/veg thing was just tough because of the frequency with which fish was prepared for or suggested to me to accommodate my vegetarian diet. I always blamed the Catholic church for this confusion, having recalled oh so many Friday nights of tuna macaroni salad and horrible fish sticks.

                        1. re: debbiel

                          I remember Good Fridays! I haven't fact checked but I believe beaver was OK to eat because they swim so much lol

                          1. re: youareabunny

                            Ha!!! Okay for the Good Friday table: fish and fish wannabes.

                    2. re: youareabunny

                      If one presses a fork against lentils, they come up between the tines too. Lot of room for interpretation there.

                      Hunt

                      1. re: Bill Hunt

                        As much as I'd love to grill him on the subject, I lost touch with him back in 2002.

                        1. re: youareabunny

                          Then, I think that the case can now be closed, and you still have a good story!

                          Hunt

                  2. re: youareabunny

                    I dated someone who was like that for ten years. It was the best relationship of my life. My next relationship was with a woman who loved to cook and eat, and the relationship was disastrous.

                    It was nice having someone who loved food the way I did, but ultimately I was happier with the one who would eat nothing but chicken nuggets for six months.

                    1. re: JonParker

                      >>My next relationship was with a woman who loved to cook and eat, and the relationship was disastrous.<<

                      I had one of those between my marriages. The cooking and the eating and the dining out was extraordinary; in every other measure, the relationship came up less-than-short, and danced often into the disasterous territory. Still, it was loads of fun for what it was, and I think if I had to sit across a table from that gentleman again, I would likely have a fine time, and then go on my merry way. But in retrospect: it was really a relationship Only About The Food.

                      My husband is now a fun person with whom to cook and eat, but that wasn't always the case - largely because he had not previously been exposedto/explored many foods prior to our meeting. It wasn't a problem for me, really, as far as how attracted I was to him initially; the previous experience with a food-centric/disasterous relationship probably would have resulted in my running away screaming if now-Hub had started any truly obnoxious high-falutin' foodie talk in early dating. Raw nerves, those, I suppose. But he didn't, and instead loved meatloaf and mashed potatoes.

                      Now if Hub had been someone who *insisted* on crap only (my own personal definitions of both insisting and crap applied), we might have had some things to discuss, likely beyond food. But his food preferences and where he was on his own trajectory of developing foodways when we met weren't an issue for me.

                      1. re: JonParker

                        You and cay... Were you maybe blinded by the good eats? Confused liking the person with liking the dates?

                        1. re: youareabunny

                          No, she seemed to share a lot of my weird interests -- silent film, mid century modern decor, etc. It was a very, very bad experience.

                          1. re: JonParker

                            Got you. I hardly date anyone with same interests as me so, can't relate. Then again I pretty much like anything.

                            I guess what I was getting at is... I've met people who go on and on about how wonderful their new guy/girl is then I find out that in 1 month they've gone to 20 restaurants, sea world, Disneyland etc. It's easy to enjoy with someone when you're doing fun things. I like to imagine myself locked with that person in a windowless room with nothing but a paper plate. See how much I like them...

                            1. re: youareabunny

                              I have often said that you can judge a relationship as healthy if you can sit home on a Sunday with nothing to do but read the NY Times, be with one another and feel fulfilled.
                              There may also be a few decent meals too. Not that food is important to me!!

                              1. re: youareabunny

                                i hadn't really dated anyone with my interests until then. This board really isn't the place to go into it, but it was bad in a life-changing way.

                                1. re: JonParker

                                  You two are having some very deep and interesting conversations here.

                            2. re: youareabunny

                              In my case I was definitely blinded. But it was such a nice departure from the grind of "reality." Messy divorce, raising two kids, hectic job. Two days a week, when my kids were with their dad, I lived in a very focused-on-food paradise. And, honestly, I learned a lot and gained a lot of kitchen skill during that relationship. It was just that, outside of the food realm, the gentleman and I were like oil and water, relationship-wise. And while food is a big personal interest of mine, it pales in comparison to my other interests. A relationship Only About The Food was just not enough.

                        2. any date that can shovel in highly processed junky food will not be for me.

                          if his palate hasn't developed beyond mac' n cheese from a box, we aren't a match.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: westsidegal

                            yea same here for me or if he is unwilling to even try anything not in a bag or box.

                          2. oh for me i kind of like it when people are willing to eat with their hands. hmmm

                            7 Replies
                              1. re: mokmokdog

                                Well, if they are from Ethiopia, or dining at an Ethiopian restaurant, that would be OK - at a Classic French restaurant, well maybe not so much.

                                Hunt

                                1. re: Bill Hunt

                                  Or eating a burger? Or pizza? Or fried chicken? Or asparagus?...

                                  Somewhere there is a thread or subthread about eating salad with one's fingers. I'm in the camp at home, fight the urge at restaurants, and occasionally lose to the urge and pick up the last straggling bites with my hands.

                                  I've only dined at fancy to uber fancy restaurants a few times. (not even going to try to define what I mean by that) I'm guessing each time there was something that I really, really wanted to pick up with my fingers, but I probably managed to not do so. sometimes, though, a perfect beautiful sauteed mushroom or slice of mushroom just begs to be picked up with fingers instead of fork. :)

                                  1. re: debbiel

                                    I ate at Lutece once and ordered squab. No way to eat that except fingers. Nobody turned a hair. Also fingers are the only correct way to eat asparagus. Ask Emily.

                                    1. re: mwhitmore

                                      My only squab was at the Chilton Club in Boston. For a while I lived around the corner from Lutece, was sorry to see it close. Finger food has devolved.....

                                    2. re: debbiel

                                      I can and do easily eat chicken with a knife and fork. Same for pizza.

                                      1. re: debbiel

                                        Those work too, as would BBQ Ribs.

                                        More to the "fingers thing," than many might imagine. Can you say "Sandwich?" Of course you can.

                                        Hunt

                                  2. No, unless someone is overtly picky and restrictive for no good reason as said above by youareabunny.

                                    But maybe I should take more notice - my most recent ex didn't like cheese or pasta. Except for when I made lasagne. And...macaroni cheese.

                                    I should have known that it wouldn't work out.

                                    1. I tend to avoid those who are a)picky, b) don't drink and c) can't deal with spicy dishes.