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Need American equivalents to German ingredient and baking sheet

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With the arrival of blue prune plums at the farmers market, I've decided to make a Zwetschgentorte (plum torte), which has been on my list of things to do for a few years now. I plan to make a yeast base with the plums on top. My recipe (from a German cookbook) calls for 1 pkg of dry yeast. Does anyone know if the weight of yeast in a German pkg is comparable to that of American pkg (i.e. 0.25 oz/7 grams)? Also, what are the dimensions of a standard German baking sheet (Backblech)? It's been a few years since I've been over there and I don't recall them being all that different from the American ones I have. Just checking to see if my memory serves me correctly!

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  1. in any case if it seems a bit slow just let it prove for a while longer.Don't worry about the yeast. I think they're about the same size.

    European baking sheets tend to be a bit smaller than American ones. They're designed to fit the 90 cm stoves that are the most common size in Europe.

    1. http://www.food.com/recipe/traditiona...

      Here is a comparable American version of this. It calls for 1 oz of yeast.

      1. My German sachet of yeast contains two tsps, approximately 8 grams of dried yeast.

        Torte is often made in a round fluted pan, and in Germany, the kuchen served with coffee is often cut from a round dessert.

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        1. re: jill kibler

          Thanks! Sounds like the package amount is the same. BTW, the torte or kuchen (my German family uses both names for the same thing) is definitely made on a baking sheet, not a round pan. I'm also familiar with the round one, which is mighty delicious!

        2. Thanks, all--appreciate your help and suggestions.

          1. Here's a link to Gesine Prado's Zwetschgentorte. http://www.gbakes.com/2013/08/nprs-al... It's authentically German and yet she's translated it into standard American ingredients and equipment.

            Hope that helps as a recipe or as a suggestion for adapting your recipe.