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Difference between Global Chefs Knive and Global Oriental Chefs Knive

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I have two global knives that i would like to understand better.

1) is the G-2 a normal 8" Chefs
2) is the G-4 which is a 7" Oriental Chef's Knife

Apart from the obvious 1" difference in the length of the blade, how do they differ from the users perspective.

What i am really trying to figure out is, when to reach for one or the other, i want to be a knife master, who always has the right knife at hand.

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  1. <2) is the G-4 which is a 7" Oriental Chef's Knife >

    That just looks like a curved Santoku:

    http://www.amazon.com/Global-G-4-Orie...

    <What i am really trying to figure out is, when to reach for one or the other, i want to be a knife master, who always has the right knife at hand.>

    A Santoku, especially a curvy Santoku, actually has a lot of overlapping with a European Chef's knife. As such, you can reach for either knives for majority of the work.

    A Santoku usually is a bit better for push cutting, while a European Chef knife is a bit better for rock chopping.

    1. I think at that point there isn't a right or wrong. Watch some of the top chefs and they will use a knife that is not the classic one for the job.

      I've seen some great chefs do a lot of their chopping (stuff most people would assume is chef's knife work) with a cleaver.

      Use what is comfortable and sharp. (Maybe not in that order.)

      1 Reply
      1. re: hambone

        I think this is good advise.

        Because i have quite a few Global knives, i guess i became concerned that they were not getting their proper use. This is because i favor some of them more than others... and this favoritism comes from a combination of them feeling comfortable and maybe a bit of sharpness.

        I'll stop fussing over which knife does what and just go by feel, and keep them as sharp as i can.

      2. Based on the pics, both knives appear to be quite similar, and will likely handle the same tasks. Aside for 1" length difference,the G-4 appears to have a curved cutting edge meant for rock-chopping vs. G-2' flatter cutting edge meant for push or draw cutting.

        In general, rock-chopping (ie. keeping the tip or part of the blade in constant contact with the cutting board) is safer, easier to learn, but imprecise and will quickly dull the edge of the knife. Conversely, push cutting (ie. elevating and position the blade for each stroke) is much more precise and edge friendly. Try mincing some herbs and julienne a pepper with both knives / cutting techniques to find which technique works best for you.

        6 Replies
        1. re: JavaBean

          <Aside for 1" length difference,the G-4 appears to have a curved cutting edge meant for rock-chopping vs. G-2' flatter cutting edge meant for push or draw cutting. >

          Thanks. I took another look. You may be correct. It looks the two knives have very similar profiles at the heel and that Oriental Chef's simply rises up quicker near the tip.

          1. re: JavaBean

            I have never really used a rock chopping motion, but after watching Jacques Pepin use his rocking action on some garlic after crushing it with the blade... i have to get into it, if only to impress people how fast i can rock! (joking).

            This has been informative.
            Thank you to all posters.

            1. re: Sneef

              is there a link you could post? i'd love to see exactly what you're talking about

              1. re: rmarisco

                Search for Essential Pépin in youtube and watch a few episodes. The man is pretty serious with a knife and i really enjoyed the episodes i watched so far (each ep is about 30 minutes, with 4-6 recipes).

                Great cooking in a great studio kitchen with great pots and pans... and i quite enjoy his accent.

                Watching his shows for me has improved my cooking no end. I was once an apprentice but gave that up for another career and then avoided cooking for 20 years, always having the feeling that if i was not cooking for other people, it was not satisfying. Now i cook for me because i love good food cooked well with great tastes and i do not want anyone else to eat because there would be less for me to enjoy!

                Watching Jacques Pepin cooking is like being back in the kitchen again as an apprentice with my french master, this time i am paying extra careful attnetion to his every knive movement, his every flick of the wrist or tap of the pan, he is teaching genuine cooking tricks that only a master chef of decades experience can show you.

                I did not enjoy his "fast food" series (earlier) anywhere near as much, the food is not as complex and often the foods in the "fast" series, to me, are not things i want to eat.

                This one is almost certain to have him rocking in it

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sqrzho...

                1. re: rmarisco

                  Here’s a few more. The rock-chopping & associated cutting strokes (HI-Low, Locomotion, Fulcrum) shown in the first three vids go hand in hand with German shaped (deep belly curve) Chef’s knives. Whereas the push-cutting + strokes in the forth vid are more for French shaped (more flat cutting edge) knives.

                  http://youtu.be/sH8pgoMzVSs

                  www.youtube.com/watch?v=5z_d0soK1cI

                  http://youtu.be/zGQltxIipFg

                  http://youtu.be/Rx1U-bja3i8

                  I used to use German chef’s knife / rock-chopping method for everything, but after converting to a Gyuto (Japanese version of a French chef’s knife), use the push-cutting method for everything except herbs.

                  Like most home cooks, I learned how to use a knife / cook from watching others and cooking shows on TV. Pepin, Julia, Sara Moulton, Martin Yan as well as the older cooking shows were great because they stressed and demonstrated the importance of proper knife skills, and actually cooked something worth trying.

                  Unfortunately, most of todays “cooking shows” are more like game shows with nothing to do with cooking. And the few shows that actually cook something, feature a “celebrity cook” with atrocious knife skills making stuff for people who can’t boil water.

                2. re: Sneef

                  I remember watching him doing the same. I've haven't used a garlic press since. Pepin's method allows for much greater control of the size of the garlic pieces, which is useful depending on how you prepare the dishes.

              2. Surely they're so similar that they would perform most tasks almost identically? Lucky you though to have both, as, if one is used and in the dishwasher, you can just reach for its companion.

                21 Replies
                1. re: Robin Joy

                  "if one is used and in the dishwasher,"

                  No knife should ever go in a dishwasher. It is a cardinal knife sin.

                  Jim

                  1. re: knifesavers

                    So I keep hearing.

                    However, I have a couple of dozen knives from Victorinox, Henkels, Global etc. etc. in regular use. They've all been dishwashed regularly for many many years (er, not my carbon Sabatiers) without the slightest problem. I have plenty from my bachelor days prior to 1990 so some must have been through over 3000 times.

                    1. re: Robin Joy

                      I have about 10 Globals, they all get put in the dishwasher in the top rack, never had a problem.

                      I had always heard not to put knives in a dishwasher, but i could never figure out "why?"

                      Anyone care to enlighten me?

                      1. re: Sneef

                        There are two hazards. 1. The water jets may toss the knife around, and cause the edge to chip if it hits something. 2) The detergents are stronger/ more corrosive than regular soap, and may cause pitting on some steels.

                        Why bother with a dishwasher, when it only takes a few minutes to wash and dry a knife by hand?

                        1. re: JavaBean

                          <it only takes a few minutes to wash and dry a knife by hand?>

                          Does it really take a few minutes to clean a knife? I am thinking about something between 10 second to 30 seconds, not minutes. :P

                          1. re: JavaBean

                            Couple of more...

                            High heat sanitation cycle can cause rapid temp changes that the rivets swell faster than the surrounding wood or plastic and can cause cracks. Plastic handled blades that got blown around during agitation may end up close to the heating element and melt.

                            Rapid temp changes are rough on wood handles which the harsh cycles are rapidly turning into driftwood.

                            Safety wise the jets can blow around the blade so during unloading if someone doesn't find the business ends with their eyes they may get a nasty cut reaching in.

                            All steels can rust and the harsh detergents and drying cycle can accelerate this.

                            As said, "Why bother with a dishwasher, when it only takes a few minutes to wash and dry a knife by hand?"

                            No knife is exempt from the bouncing objects edge damage, and the other risk will vary by blade, handle etc.

                            Maybe you haven't had these things happen but they do so using a dishwasher is at best risky for the blade and simple to mitigate that risk.

                            Jim

                            1. re: knifesavers

                              <As said, "Why bother with a dishwasher, when it only takes a few minutes to wash and dry a knife by hand?">

                              For the love of god, do you guys really takes minutes to wash one knife? How is that even possible. I don't even spend a few minutes to brush my teeth.

                              <2) The detergents are stronger/ more corrosive than regular soap, and may cause pitting on some steels. >

                              <All steels can rust and the harsh detergents and drying cycle can accelerate this.>

                              These are the stronger arguments in my opinion.

                              1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                For the love of god, do you guys really takes minutes to wash one knife? How is that even possible. I don't even spend a few minutes to brush my teeth.

                                Nah, I just can't type and think at the same time. It takes me less than a minute to wash, dry, and really dry a blade.

                            2. re: JavaBean

                              "Why bother with a dishwasher, when it only takes a few minutes to wash and dry a knife by hand?"

                              hehehe, some of us have domestic servants and/or wives who are likely to lose a handful of fingers if allowed to wash my knives by hand.

                              Actually my wife is less terrified of my knives now, though she refuses to use them. The maid still treats them like she is handling nitroglycerin, it's quite fun to watch.

                              Certainly if i had plastic or wood handled knives, or knives with rivets, or knives so light that they blew around in the dishwasher on the top shelf (wow some of you must have really light knives)... then i probably would not put them through the dishwasher.

                              For me, Globals are 100% dishwasher proof, no pitting, no rusting, no damage, razor sharp, I'll use 4 or 5 knives, sometimes even more, to cook a meal. I do not even wipe them down afterwards... later the magic cleaning fairy comes and puts them into the dishwasher and like magic... my knives are ready for action again.

                              Years of this abuse combined with regularish sharpening with hone or stone... they are sharper than from the factory and in 100% perfect shape.

                              1. re: Sneef

                                Well, problem solved. Since you have a maid, since you have maids, then I suggest you buy both of these filet knives. :D

                          2. re: Robin Joy

                            Hi Robin Joy,

                            I found this Wusthof 10" chef knife at one of the local trift stores. New, it's a $150 knife.

                            I have no idea exactly what kind of life it's had, but in addition to its various abuse scars, I'd guess it's been run thru the dishwasher too much.

                             
                             
                             
                            1. re: Eiron

                              Typical shoddy German workmanship.

                              But seriously, what a good find! Years of life in that beauty.

                              1. re: Eiron

                                That is just an excuse to get some brass(?) rivets a piece of black walnut (or whatever lights your fancy) and try your hand at making a custom handle.

                                  1. re: Eiron

                                    well don't I feel a little silly...

                                    1. re: hambone

                                      LOL, "a little silly" is my general state of being...

                                      I do plan on repairing & rehandling the Wusthof. The spine is damaged from striking, & the blade is damaged from prying. I'll fix those scars & give it either an oak, pecan or black walnut handle. The center rivet will be replaced with my own mosaic pin, & the two outer rivets will be solid brass pins.

                                      I'll post pics when I finally get around to working on it.

                                      1. re: Eiron

                                        Thanks.

                                        Would love to see it.

                                        I'm gonna start doing that, checking second hand/consignment/Salvation Army places for junked old good knives.

                                        1. re: Eiron

                                          Hi Eiron -

                                          Good luck to your project.

                                          Looking forward to hearing how it comes out.

                                  2. re: Eiron

                                    I was going to ask "How do you know it has been run through the dishwasher too much?", but then I look at the photos, and they explain. Photo#4 is amazing.

                                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                      :-?

                                      I only posted three photos...

                                      :-D

                                      1. re: Eiron

                                        Oh, I see. I didn't know CHOWHOUND has upgrade the photo viewing panel. Now, when I click on your photos, I don't only get to see your photos. I see all the photos in this thread. :)

                            2. Hi Sneef -

                              Which take longer ?

                              A.) Sink pre-filled with hot, soapy water. Knife is used, rinsed, wiped, placed in hot soapy water. ( Continue on cooking in kitchen ) 5 minutes or so later, the soaked knife is removed, rinsed, and placed over sink on a magnetic bar or (in my case) a magnetic circle attachment on our stainless kitchen rail, hilt or handle side up.

                              6+ minutes ?

                              B.) Knife is rinsed off, wiped, and put into a dishwasher. Even at Energy-saving, partial, or full washing cycle, with the drying that could be:

                              45 minutes to an hour. Perhaps more to cool off.

                              Much has been mentioned here about the risk of placing any good knife in the dishwasher. Cracking, blade pitting, scoring, hitting and cracking something else in the dishwasher, and in the case of Global Knife, the dreaded specific warranty exclusion.

                              Let me add another.

                              Despite having a creating a large collection over many decades, I too have my favourite knives for different meals. So I may use 4-6 different knives with my wife in a big dinner or party. I want the use of certain knives as tools throughout this exercise, some knives repeatedly.

                              I sometimes think of this as surgery, if you will, as a facet of mise en place. However, despite the temptation to say to my wife " Nurse, the French knife please, " I never do, as I might receive it into my ear, or somewhere else more painful.

                              Sneef, you have a lot of good information here on this thread. You might consider writing a book titled " The Official Handbook on being a Master Knife Chef. "

                              I am not aware that anyone has as yet. I'll purchase a copy.

                              1. Our prime-use Global, Rösle, and Wüsthof knives are kept in locked cabinets beneath the countertop, a safety around children consideration.

                                We remove one or both depending on the type and size of a dinner or party. The Global can sit on the kitchen island, and the Rösle can hang on the wall rail, or stand on it's own.

                                Either can go outside when the weather is good, or with us up in the mountains, on holiday.

                                I know it is treasonous heresy to mix the knives in the Global block, but that is just the way it is. If any are not there, then they are hanging over the sink fresh washed and drying.

                                This method works very well for us.

                                 
                                 
                                3 Replies
                                1. re: SWISSAIRE

                                  Careful, all this knife heresy might get you burned at the stake.

                                   
                                  1. re: Sneef

                                    As the British are fond of saying: " It's a fair cop. "

                                    Always look on the bright side of life: Better burned than impaled.

                                  2. re: SWISSAIRE

                                    <I know it is treasonous heresy to mix the knives in the Global block>

                                    It is definitely not heresy. I am biased and can be prejudice (we all can be). I usually have more respect for people who have a mix and match knife set. To me, this at the very least indicates the person tried to think about what knives to get and what knives not to go.