HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

September 2013 Cookbook of the Month, SMOKE AND PICKLES: Pickles & Matrimony and Veggies & Charity

Please use this thread to report on the following chapters from the September Cookbook of the Month:

Pickles & Matrimony pages 160 - 185
Veggies & Charity pages 186 - 217

To post a review of any recipe, please select the appropriate thread below. If you are the first to report on a recipe, please reply to the original post. If a report already exists (please check before posting), please hit the reply box within the original report. This way all of the reports on the same dish will be together.

The Chowhound Team has asked me to remind you that verbatim copying of recipes to the boards is a violation of the copyright of the original author. Posts with copied recipes will be removed.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Collards and Kimchi (page 200)

    Heat lard or bacon fat (I used bacon fat) and cook chopped onions (I realized too late that I was out of onions so substituted shallots) until they begin to color. Add cubed country ham and cook until crispy, but not too brown. (My pan started to scorch, so I didn’t get quite to the crispy part.) Add cleaned and chopped collard greens, chicken stock (Better Than Boullion for me), and soy sauce. Cover and simmer for about half an hour, stir in some apple cider vinegar and then the kimchi (I used a store bought kimchi that was labeled “medium spicy” but packed a good bit of punch). I made this to serve as a side with his T-Bone Steak with Lemongrass-Habanero Marinade on page 67 as suggested ( http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9152... ).

    Wow! What an explosion of intense flavors. I just adored this. He says it also goes nicely with roast lamb or fried chicken. Not sure about the former, but think it would be absolutely brilliant with fried chicken.

    This was my sixth recipe from the book and I’m beginning to think Edward Lee is a genius along the lines of Yotam Ottolenghi. So original, so unexpected, so good.

     
    15 Replies
    1. re: JoanN

      "I’m beginning to think Edward Lee is a genius along the lines of Yotam Ottolenghi." Wow, that is very high praise! The salad you reported on in the other thread looks and sounds fantastic.

      1. re: LulusMom

        I am inclined to agree with Joan. I've tried many of the recipes (since I didn't have last month's COTM, I got an early start), and most are winners.

      2. re: JoanN

        This looks like a good way to use up some of the 6 packs (!) of Trader Joe's kimchi that I bought.

        1. re: JoanN

          [Collards] and Kimchi, Pg. 200

          In our case it was Beet Greens and Kimchi but that was all right because the intense flavor from seasonings and kimchi created a most delicious and satisfying finished dish. The bunch of greens was large. I used only the leaves and some small and tender stems, saving the large stems for another application. The other substitution was diced pancetta for country ham. The rest of the ingredients remained the same. I used only 2 cups of homemade chicken broth, and Trader Joe's Korean Napa Cabbage Kimchi.

          TJ's kimchi was mildly spicy with a little kick back that gave a pleasant after taste. I loved it for the taste and because it's just a simple fermented vegetable combination. w no preservatives. That will be a larder staple from now on. FWIW, I removed the kimchi from the package to a canning jar and it's sitting in the fridge awaiting my fork.

          1. re: Gio

            I had no idea TJ's had kimchi! I'll have to go in search of that. Thanks for the tip!

          2. re: JoanN

            My turn on this one...I don't have the book, so got the recipe online here:
            http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_2351682...

            This was Edward Lee meets TJs. I used a bag of TJ's southern greens blend (mustard, turnip, collards and spinach), diced pancetta and TJ's kimchi a la Gio, and boxed chicken stock. I bet it would be even better with a spicier kimchi from Koreatown and great stock, but even with my shortcuts it was delicious! Served it with some grilled baguette to sop up the extra juices, as well as a simple grilled chicken breast with BBQ sauce.

            Leftovers will likely find their way into a frittata with some extra kimchi.

            1. re: mebby

              We picked up some collard greens yesterday and plan to make it again with all the recommended ingredients. And that kimchi seemed OK to me. I had intended to add a little more heat via red pepper flakes or picapepper sauce but decided it was fine as is.

              1. re: Gio

                Yes, agreed. I've used the TJ's kimchi before and it is FAR better than the jarred stuff I previously got at my local high-end supermarket. I kept having to refill my mise en place because I kept picking off bits of the kimchi with my fingers while cooking :) But given that I live in L.A., which I believe has the largest Korean population outside of Korea and a thriving Koreatown, it seems silly not to avail myself of some of the varieties there.

                That said, I wouldn't hesitate to make exactly the same way again because it was great as is.

                1. re: mebby

                  I'm definitely going to be trying the TJs kimchi. I'm often amazed at how good their stuff is, and it is good to know this is an option. I love the bulgogi recipe in Gourmet Today - this might be a nice, easy side.

                  1. re: mebby

                    Yes, we are large consumers of TJ's kimchi. My husband is Korean and so we eat a fair amount of kimchi. The Trader Joes is the best we can find locally for sale. It is not as good as the made in-store kind my Mom can bring down form Baltimore, but it's better than our other local options (including the made in store options from our local Korean market.

              2. re: JoanN

                Collards and Kimchi, page 200

                We LOVED this. In truth, we love collards and kimchi and we have a fondness for country ham, so this is not surprising. But I think this dish really show's Edward Lee's genius (yes, Joan, you are correct, he does have genius!!).

                I live in the South and my husband is Korean, so these are all things that we know and love but I would have never thought to have put them together like this. But this is a dish that is an instant classic in my book, one that I will make over and over.

                One note about the recipe... it calls for 10 oz of chopped country ham. I was using a very pricey artisanal country ham and probably only used 2 ounces. I thought that was about right though, for the amount of collards. More than that, and I think it might have been too salty for us.

                I served this with Lee's Potato stuffed roast chicken, rice, and nori. This dish stole the show. I would have been happy to just eat the collards and kimchi and rice. So good!

                 
                1. re: JoanN

                  Collards and Kimchi Pg. 200

                  This was made to go along with the Miso Smothered Chicken and I thought the slight acidity of the dish did very well with the richness of the miso smothered chicken.

                  I did have to go with Kale as I couldn't find any Collards, so the simmer was a bit shorter but I do think that the Kale worked very well. I also couldn't find any country ham so I had to go with what he calls a city ham (or wet ham I believe). I had to really crank the heat to get it to brown as it is by its nature wetter than dry cured hams, but I thought it still worked pretty well.

                  On the whole I am sure this dish would be better with the proper ingredients, but for a Canadian who had trouble accessing some of the ingredients I was very happy with this dish of braised southern/korean inspired greens.

                  I must admit I also love Kimchi and the store bought variety I got was actually quite good.

                  On the whole a definite winner for me.

                   
                  1. re: JoanN

                    Collards and Kimchi, p. 200

                    Last week, the CSA haul included collards, so after reading all the raves for this recipe, I knew what they were destined for. My major departure from the recipe was to skip the ham, or any substitute product. I used a combo of olive oil and butter to sauté, and just continued on with adding the collards after the onion was sufficiently softened. My bunch of collards was quite small, just over a half pound before trimming, so I adjusted things down proportionally. They were sufficiently tender after 20 minutes of simmering. As things finished up cooking, I browned a smoked chicken sausage, which I sliced up and added to the pot, turning this into a hearty and delicious one-dish meal.

                    1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                      I too made this dish last night -- a half recipe because my bunch of collards was on the small side. I didn't have any ham so subbed a few strips of bacon for the porky element. And I messed up my proportions so I ended up with more onions and cider vinegar than chef lee intended. We did enjoy this, as expected, and I'd like to try it with the country ham if I ever run across any. [I may just try subbing prosciutto instead].

                    2. re: JoanN

                      Collards and Kimchi, page 200.

                      I was so pleased to find collards in the CSA this past week, so I was finally able to jump on this bandwagon. I purchased TJ's kimchi for the first time, and it was quite nice. Perhaps not as spicy as some I had, but perfect for this dish. I didn't have lard, and I didn't have ham, so I cooked chopped bacon, used the bacon in place of ham, and used the drippings in place of lard.

                      This was a wonderful dish with a great balance of spicy, sour, and salty. Even some sweetness in there from our slightly sweet onions. It's definitely a do-again, and I will probably use bacon again.

                       
                    3. Edamame Hummus (page 199)

                      Finely chopped shallot and garlic sautéed in olive oil until soft, shelled edamame are added and cooked for 2 minutes, then a mixture of water, tahini, lemon juice, soy sauce, salt, and ground cumin is added and all is simmered gently for 6 minutes. The whole thing is tossed into a food processor and pulsed until you have a “thick, crumbly puree.” This can be kept warm until ready to serve, or served at room temperature.

                      Since I was serving this as a side with Vietnamese Lamb Chops ( http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9152... ), I kept it warm. It was a bit runnier than I’d expected, but noted that it firmed up as it cooled.

                      I made the full recipe since he says that it’s a great snack served with raw vegetables, and that’s just what I did the next day. This was interesting served warm as a side; it was just outstanding served room temperature as a dip. It was so flavorful and satisfying, I ended up making a meal of it, although that had no been my original intention. This is going to be made often around here (and has, in fact, been made two more times since this report was first written at the end of June).

                       
                      5 Replies
                      1. re: JoanN

                        I can't wait to try this hummus. It's just moved up on the list.

                        1. re: JoanN

                          I'm looking for kids lunch box snacks. I'll shall try this!

                          ~TDQ

                          1. re: JoanN

                            Edamame Hummus p. 199

                            After sauteing the main ingredients and then simmering them for 6 minutes as directed in the book, I used a stick blender to puree the mixture with great success.

                            I served the hummus at room temperature. Although it still tasted great when warm, the runny texture wasn't appealing to me. I chopped up veggies to dip in the hummus and also had crackers and tortillas. All of them were great vessels for the hummus.

                            Overall, this was a big success and a must make again. I served it to my mum and her partner during their visit and they requested the recipe. I also served lobster dip that evening and the hummus was the star of the 2 dips.

                             
                            1. re: JoanN

                              Edamame Hummus, p. 199

                              I'm rather embarrassed to post about this one as it took me two tries. Who needs two tries to make a batch of hummus, she asks, sheepishly.

                              I followed the recipe to a tee--or so I thought. But after processing the whole shebang, my puree was not “thick and crumbly,” only slightly thickish and very, well, grainy--quite unappealing. Then I realized my mistake. I'd misread the recipe and not started out with *cooked* edamame. Duh. Surely couldn't take this to the game-watching party we were headed to.

                              After a quick trip to the grocery store for more edamame, I tried again, this time cooking the edamame according to the package directions (and then a good bit longer as I was determined to soften up those babies) and proceeding with the recipe as has been described above. This time it was pretty creamy, a little runnier than usual, but I liked the texture.

                              I spooned it into a shallow bowl, added a puddle of olive oil, a few squirts of lemon juice, a sprinkling of Aleppo pepper, and a few bobs of bourbon-pickled jalapeño for garnish. Brought pita wedges along with it.

                              Not much to add--except that it was a hit. I feared it seemed a little pedestrian among all the other dishes at the party, but people kept saying that it was the best hummus they’d ever had, etc., commented on its lemony-ness, and then seemed completely pleased to learn it was edamame hummus. Not a smidge left in the dish after less than an hour.

                              1. re: JoanN

                                Edamame Hummus, p. 199

                                One more happy report on this dish. I took a cue from Musie and blended it in the pot with an immersion blender. I held back on the amount of salt, and found upon tasting after it was blended that it didn't need more. When warm, I found the tahini flavor quite dominant (though I used more like 1/3 cup than 1/2), but after it hung out in the fridge overnight and came back to room temp, the lemon came through more and it seemed better balanced. Terrific as a dip for vegetables.

                              2. Bourbon-Pickled Jalapeños (page175)

                                Jalapeños are cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds and pickled for 3 days in a mixture of white vinegar, bourbon, honey, coriander, salt, yellow mustard, and bay leaves.

                                I should have tasted the jalapeños before pickling them. Mine were so unbearably hot I could barely eat a small piece of it, even being sure to eat neither rib nor seed. I had to throw them away. But I would definitely try making them again, making absolutely certain the jalapeños were edible first. I’ll bet they’d make a great cocktail garnish.

                                 
                                5 Replies
                                1. re: JoanN

                                  Bourbon-Pickled Jalapeños, p. 175

                                  Mine are hot, but definitely edible (for me, anyway; DH wouldn't even try one). So far I've only eaten a few pieces with some cold pork loin, but I see a pulled pork sandwich in their future. (I can't say, however, that I can really taste the bourbon, which I was looking forward to.)

                                  The FM vendor told me that the lovely red, orange, and yellow jalapeño-shaped chiles were “just like jalapeños,” and they do seem so (though maybe they're milder than Joan's jalapeños). So I decide to sub these colorful babies in for the regular green ones. And they really are pretty.

                                  I wanted to reduce the recipe and learned the hard way (what I’m sure you smarter cooks already know): you can’t cut liquid amounts in half just because you are halving a recipe! Actually, I cut the peppers called for to 5 ½ oz and cut the liquid by half, and still had to quickly make extra pickling liquid. Otherwise, this, like most of Lee’s pickle recipes was very easy.

                                   
                                  1. re: JoanN

                                    Bourbon-Pickled Jalapeños, p. 175

                                    I made these exactly as directed. I used jalapeños with very smooth skin (stressed peppers are said to be hotter) and mine have a healthy kick to them.

                                    The flavor is really complex. Another keeper!

                                    1. re: meatn3

                                      I've really been enjoying the jalapeños!

                                      Aside from eating them as is I chopped some and added them to the stuffing for a poblano casserole and they really added terrific flavor and just the right amount of heat.

                                      I think they would be a killer addition to pimento cheese!

                                    2. re: JoanN

                                      That's too bad that you threw them away. The longer they sit, the milder they get. I do a traditional soy sauce/sugar/garlic version with serranos and the first few days I start coughing when I open the jar. After another couple days in room temperature, they mellow out to just the right spiciness.

                                      1. re: soypower

                                        I didn't throw them away until after they'd been in the fridge about a week and a half and they were still inedible. I used the jalapenos from the same batch (along with other chiles) to make the Hot Sauce that accompanies the Honey-Glazed Roast Duck and that was edible only when thinned 1:1 with water.

                                        These were beautiful looking, smooth-skinned, but unusually large jalapenos that I bought at an Asian market. I don't recall ever having had a jalapeno that hot. At least I didn't have to throw out something with a bunch of expensive ingredients in it.

                                    3. Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise (page 176)

                                      Peeled peaches are sliced into wedges, packed into a glass jar, and covered with champagne vinegar, water, sugar, salt, star anise, chile peppers (he calls for Serranos but I didn’t have any so substituted a habañero) that has been brought to a boil to dissolve the sugar. Jasmine tea bags are added to the jar and removed after day one. The peaches are ready in two days and keep in the fridge for up to three weeks.

                                      He suggests serving these with any kind of fatty pork dish or with lamb or goat, or on a cheese plate with an aged sheep’s milk cheese and crusty bread.

                                      I served them with some of the Pulled Pork Shoulder that didn’t find it’s way into sandwiches.

                                      These were great; really a perfect foil for the pork. I made only half a recipe and that was a mistake. Will definitely make a full batch next time since I could just eat these right out of the jar. That said, I can’t wait to try them with the cheese. Hurry up while there are still fresh peaches around. These are just so easy and so good I’m sure I’ll be making them for years to come.

                                       
                                      28 Replies
                                      1. re: JoanN

                                        Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise, p.176

                                        Perfume in a pickle jar! I just wanted to add to Joan's excellent report that the fragrance emanating from this jar is just lovely.

                                        I made a whole recipe, as written, but I think my peaches were a tad riper than what would be ideal for pickling. I ate a few straight from the jar and served some on a pâté plate last night, to raves from one particular guest. Although I found them delicious, I think that the next time I make them--and there will be an again--I will use two teabags instead of three and cut back on the star anise as well. I'd prefer those flavors to be just slightly more subtle. (My guest thought they were perfect as is--and copied the recipe to take home.)

                                         
                                        1. re: nomadchowwoman

                                          I'm stealing your photo. So much more appealing than mine, and more accurate as well.

                                          1. re: JoanN

                                            Thanks, Joan--that tickled me as I am known for my extremely poor photography skills. The lighting in my fridge must be just right.

                                            Any ideas about what to do with the leftover pickling liquid?

                                            1. re: nomadchowwoman

                                              Most pickle brines can simply be reboiled for two minutes and reused. With this brine, it sounds as though you might want to refresh a smidgen and use a fresh tea bag.

                                              1. re: smtucker

                                                I just did exactly that and just added some fresh peach slices. Didn't use a fresh tea bag, though, since the brine still had plenty of jasmine aroma. (That may be because I used two tea bags for half the recipe.) Not ready for tasting yet so I don't know how the two batches will compare or if I'll even notice the difference.

                                                1. re: JoanN

                                                  Coming back to report that putting fresh peach slices in second-time-around brine made for a significantly more intense peach slice. Everything about it was more: more heat, more anise, more vinegar. Still good, but different and not at all subtle. They were fine for me, but I’d make a fresh batch of brine if I were serving these to company. Curious if those of you who tried this had a similar or different experience?

                                                  And as long as I’m here, last night I had the last of the peaches with the famous Southeast Asian Turkey Burger from “Gourmet Today.” I had the burger with the sauce, but without the bun and herbs. Outstanding pairing. Not that these peaches don’t go well with a lot of things, but this was just brilliant.

                                                    1. re: Westminstress

                                                      Not Joan but I'm here to say YOU HAVE TO TRY THESE. And yes, it is the first one of the two.

                                                      1. re: LulusMom

                                                        Thanks, I will! Do you serve them as directed, drizzled with the sauce and topped with piles of herbs?

                                                        1. re: Westminstress

                                                          Well, I do the drizzled sauce and the herbs, but I know that others have had success without the bun. I could live without the bun, but not without the sauce and the herbs - they really add a lot. They're easy and they are really incredibly good (if you like an Asian flavor-profile). Ever since I first made them they've been in pretty heavy rotation around here.

                                                          1. re: LulusMom

                                                            I simply served them with steamed brown rice with the sauce and herbs.

                                                    2. re: JoanN

                                                      I had a significantly different experience, but I didn't actually reboil the brine, I just shoved more peach slices into it, so that's a rather different thing than pouring hot brine over the peaches. As noted below, I had previously pulled the chile pieces from the jar, and this time I didn't peel the peaches. Upon tasting the new slices today, they really screamed PEACH! in a way the original did not, but I'm sure that was probably as much my not heating the syrup as not peeling. The other flavors took a back seat, and in fact I shoved another teabag in before returning the jar to the fridge. When I finish these, if there are still local peaches to be had, I'll try reboiling the brine and adding more to see how that is.

                                                      1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                                                        I think my main takeaway lesson here is to remove the hot pepper much earlier in the game, perhaps as soon as day three. And I'll try not peeling the peaches since I don't think I'd mind the skin on in the least. Unfortunately, further experiments will have to wait until next peach season.

                                                  1. re: smtucker

                                                    Thx to you and Joan. That never even occurred to me.

                                            2. re: JoanN

                                              Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise, p.176

                                              Wow! I'm so stoked that so many people have made this, and so many other recipes, already.

                                              For my version of this, I used a good loose leaf jasmine tea, and strained the brine before adding to the jar. I used red Thai chiles. I've been getting peaches every week all summer from my CSA, and they tend to come a bit crisp but soften within 48 hours, so this recipe is perfect if I use them the day I get them. The perfume of the jasmine tea is an amazing compliment to the peaches. This is one stunner of a pickle!

                                              1. re: MelMM

                                                I think I'm going to have to buy some peaches at the farmer's market next week. All the reports sound great!

                                              2. re: JoanN

                                                Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise, p.176

                                                I'm happy to see all the raves, because I just put a half recipe in the fridge, and now I'm really anticipating trying them in a couple of days. I had to buy peaches at the store, because there is no such thing as an underripe peach in my CSA box or local farmers' market, which is normally a good thing!

                                                I did have to make two unplanned changes. I'd forgotten about the chile, so I ended up using a quartered jalapeño as that was the only fresh kind I had. And I didn't check my pantry stores, and emptying the sugar bag yielded only half the amount I'd need, so I made up the rest with turbinado sugar. Like Joan, I used two tea bags.

                                                1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                                                  I've been as pleased with these as everyone else. I was happy with the level of flavor from the star anise and jasmine, but I pulled the jalapeño pieces out after a few days because, while didn't make them too spicy in the too-much-heat sense, I thought the heat kind of overwhelmed the other flavors, including that of the peaches.

                                                  After I ate all the peach slices, I also cut up more and shoved them into the remaining syrup, though not as firm/underripe as the first batch. I decided not to peel, in the interest of preserving as much peach flavor as possible. I haven't tasted yet, so I'll have to see how that worked out.

                                                2. re: JoanN

                                                  Help my fellow COTM-ers. The only Jasmine tea at my local Korean market is a loose tea. Would someone be willing to weigh their Jasmine Tea bag and tell me how heavy [light] it is? Grams would be great. I have the peaches...

                                                    1. re: smtucker

                                                      According to my scale, one teabag, Twinings, contains 1.5 grams of loose tea.

                                                      1. re: JoanN

                                                        The two of you are GREAT! Thank you so very much.

                                                    2. re: JoanN

                                                      I also made these last week. I've had them on the side of quite a few dishes ... some barbecued chicken and the brined pork chops from this book. They are a nice change.

                                                      1. re: JoanN

                                                        Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise (page 176)

                                                        I made these too! I used half the amount of peaches but full amount of brine since I'm a household of one and Lee gives these a 3 week shelf life.

                                                        My only changes were to use half champagne vinegar (frosted bottle had looked full) and half pear vinegar. My serrano's were green rather than the red in the book's photo.

                                                        Really nice with a mild kick which makes them rather addicting! I'll have plenty of brine left and plan to reboil and use them with plums. This one is a keeper!

                                                        1. re: meatn3

                                                          My peaches were very much enjoyed but went mushy a little earlier than Lee noted.

                                                          I strained the brine and reboiled it. I added Asian pears. Fantastic! I used part of another (bosc iirc) pear too. Tastes nice but the Asian pear has a better texture and seems to have taken on the brine better.

                                                        2. re: JoanN

                                                          I was debating whether to post this at all, but I just haven't been as enamoured with these peaches as the rest of you. My batch tastes like gussied up canned peaches (very sweet and soft peaches in a syrupy liquid, made punchier with vinegar and spice). Perhaps my peaches were too ripe for pickling? They seemed green enough when I was slicing them up, but they are quite soft in the brine.

                                                          1. re: Westminstress

                                                            Mine didn't become soft until they had been in the brine for more than a week, maybe a week and a half. And I certainly wouldn't have equated the sweetness level with canned peaches, which make my teeth hurt. But I do see what you mean. Perhaps a lot has to do not only with the ripeness of the peaches but with the variety as well.

                                                          2. re: JoanN

                                                            Pickled Jasmine Peaches with Star Anise (page 176)

                                                            I too found these a bit too sweet for my tastes, but I really like the subtle flavorings. I bought more under-ripe peaches to make a second batch with less sugar, but just didn't get to it. We will be having a peach caflouti for dinner tonight!

                                                            The peaches that I used might have been too sweet for this preparation. There seem to be a number of varieties being grown locally, but no one is bothering to name them at the farmer's market. I will try this again next summer. I think this is worth further investigation!

                                                          3. I am planning to make this week
                                                            pineapple-pickled jicama,pickled garlic, and pickled coffee beets
                                                            I wonder if I can us instant coffee in place of the beans?

                                                            3 Replies
                                                            1. re: jpr54_1

                                                              I just prepared the
                                                              Pineapple-Pickled Jicama
                                                              page 172

                                                              I used canned pineapple in own juice in place of fresh

                                                              1. re: jpr54_1

                                                                I enjoyed the results last night with roast cornish hen

                                                                1. re: jpr54_1

                                                                  I made the edamame and hummus this morning.
                                                                  I added more garlic and water.
                                                                  it was delicious

                                                                  i think i will add some dried jalapeno to a small amount of the mixture-to kick it up a notch