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Eating Healthfully

It occurred to me today that several years ago, I changed my tune. I went from "that food isn't good for me" to "that food isn't good". This, to me, is the difference between feeling punished by healthy food vs. preferring healthy food.

I know there are differing opinions about what healthy food is; I consider healthy food to be fresh and real, as opposed to chemical-laden and nutrient- and fiber-free. Others' ideas may be different...

What I also know is that I am more satisfied and find more enjoyment when the food is fresh and real. This frees me from the mindset that healthy food is some sort of punishment.

Thoughts?

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  1. < I went from "that food isn't good for me" to "that food isn't good". This, to me, is the difference between feeling punished by healthy food vs. preferring healthy food. >

    I thought you went from being self-analysis (that food isn't good for me) to being public-awareness (that food isn't good (for anyone)).

    <I know there are differing opinions about what healthy food is; I consider healthy food to be fresh and real, as opposed to chemical-laden and nutrient- and fiber-free.>

    I prefer fresh and natural food ingredients over heavily altered and enhanced food. My thinking is sometime due to health, like you said, but many times have to do with proper skill set and art. Some time ago there was a post about adding MSG to food to enhance the favor. I personally do not believe MSG is particularly harmful to the body. However, I find the concept of adding MSG to any dishes to enhancing favor a bit degrading. It is cheating in my opinion.

    "Like I said, I consider adding pure ethanol to a bottle of wine as cheating to wine making, just like adding MSG to dishes as cheating to home cooking. Exactly same analogy -- one try to add pure ethanol, and the other try to add a synthetic form of an amino acid. "

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7721...

    2 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

      What I (maybe clumsily) meant by "that food isn't good", is that unhealthy food just doesn't taste good.

      Once a person is "weaned" from chemical and processed food, that food becomes less appealing and just doesn't taste as good.

      This is my experience.

      Thanks for your thoughtful response.

      1. re: sandylc

        basically,
        you need to start climbing the learning curve about eating all over again.
        i was raised on "bland" food because my mother believed it was more healthful.
        now i eat curries all the time, italian soups, thai tofu wraps with peanut sauce, etc

        it's a matter of expanding your horizons.. . .

    2. i try to avoid labeling foods as "good" or "bad" or "healthy" or "unhealthy". obviously as someone with a history of severe anorexia nervosa, i have my own reasons for shunning such labels (and it took many, MANY hours of therapy to shed them). however, additionally, i like to adhere to the notion that food is morally neutral, and all things are ok in moderation. people can be good or bad, actions can be good or bad, but food, like a pencil, is morally neutral.

      the only thing i do stick to in terms of "not good/bad" is things that aren't food - for example, trans fats, or artificial sweeteners. since these aren't, strictly speaking, "food" in the natural sense, i try to avoid them whenever possible.

      ultimately, though, i try to steer myself in terms of 1) my dietitian-established guidelines for a varied diet inclusive of all necessary food groups (starches, proteins, fats, fruits, vegetables, and milks/calciums) and 2) what i like or enjoy.

      for me, this is a comfortable and non-judgmental way to steer my own eating. of course, everyone is different! if your system works for you, that's what matters - ultimately no two people eat exactly the same, and there are a lot of different (perfectly acceptable) ways to nourish your body and your health.

      2 Replies
      1. re: chartreauxx

        I found that to be a very healthy post.

        1. re: chartreauxx

          I 100% agree and try not to label food as good or bad or myself as good or bad based on what I ate. I often will comment when close relatives or good friends do this and highlight tat food should not be a character judgement.

        2. I don't think I have ever considered whether a food choice was healthy or not. And I hope I never do,

          I'm content being a short, fat, middle-aged man, instead of a short middle-aged man.

          2 Replies
          1. re: Harters

            Your body, your science experiment. But it's not all about weight. It's about keeping your mobility and wits til the end.

            Priorites: we each get to choose our own.

            1. re: mcf

              ^^This. It's about feeding yourself/your loved ones what those bodies need.

              Both H and I eat low carb---H, because he has to, and I because our household is small and it's more convenient---but also because I too need good protein and lots of veggies in my diet to do what I need to do. I could not live without caffeine; he can't have it because of an arrhythmia.

              The proof of a healthy diet is in the pudding (so to speak): if your blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, etc, are good; if your intestines are happy; if your nails and skin and hair are happy; if you generally have enough energy to go about your business---you're probably doing the right thing.

          2. Avoid green meat and skinny people, you'll never go wrong.

            1. The problem is that "healthy" is a moving target. Red meat used to be "healthy." Same with eggs; they used to be good for you, then they were bad, then they were good in moderation. They're probably due to be bad pretty soon. Then there's coffee, which is good for diabetes, alzheimers, and parkinsons disease, but bad for elevated cholesterol and heart disease.

              Nutrition is a lot like life, you need to take the good with the bad. All I know is that on my deathbed, I'm not going to wish I'd eaten more salad.