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The Specials of the Day

Is it disruptive to you to be interrupted in your table conversation to be told the specials? And isn't it more 'special' to find a supplemental list of the day's particular offering?

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  1. I get told the specials when I'm placing my order so it's no more disruptive than pausing my conversation to actually order. I prefer a written list- it's more convenient.

    1. Usually the specials are given when the menu has been handed to me, so I don't usually find it disruptive.

      But yes, I prefer written form vs. an audible.

      11 Replies
        1. re: coll

          That should be a given, IMO. It takes the restaurant so little extra time to price things out on the specials sheet....Just DO IT. :-)

          1. re: LindaWhit

            My main peeve is that I hate when I have already decided on an item on the regular menu and then they hand me a curveball when they come to take the order.

            Or at the very least put up a chalk board, despite the fact that they are so hard to read usually. At least you get the clue that something else might be available, before you prematurely commit.

            1. re: coll

              Or you could ask when first seated if there are specials this evening. Then you know to be on the lookout for them.

              1. re: ttoommyy

                Nah, that's their job, as far as I'm concerned. I'm usually too busy blabbing and settling in.

                1. re: coll

                  Ok. Fair enough. We're all different. When the host or hostess seats us and we are exchanging pleasantries, the 5 seconds it takes to ask, "are there specials this evening?" is no problem for me.

                  1. re: ttoommyy

                    I'm a little ditzy when it comes to remembering things. A man (or woman) has to know their limitations!

                  1. re: ttoommyy

                    I always ask first, because I'm eager to try something that's not on the regular menu. I'd hate to miss some wonderful dish that's just made one day only.

              2. re: coll

                Ah, the mystery prices on "specials." I hate that, as I am often hosting the table. If the regular mains are, say US $50, I do not want to find out that some "special" turned out to be US $150, without some mention of that. Let us know, as not everyone is a Regional President for Barclay's Bank, and will gladly expense $600,000 in food and wines, for a single meal.

                Same goes for the situation, where I order two wines, in the US $175-250 range, only to find out that the restaurant is out. Such happens. Then, the sommelier comes over with a rec, to replace those wines. "OK, that sounds good," only to find out that that rec. was US $450/btl. That is not cool. My price-points were established, off of the wine list already.

                OK, "rant mode" turned off.

                Hunt

            2. No more disruptive than interrupting the table conversation to take the order.

              That said, I want a printed specials menu, not a memorized oral presentation, and that printed page had better include prices, or I'll be igoring it.

              The oral specials presentation is merely a sales gimmick/tool that benefits only the restauarnt/server, not the diner.

              1 Reply
              1. re: bagelman01

                Yes.
                In my experience the oral recitation of specials is too often done by a server who doesn't have all the details/ingredients committed to memory....and never a price attached. The written specials option should--if done well--take care of both.

              2. I have never had the specials been told to me at any other time thenwhen the server hands me menu..or by the hostess when we are first seated.... but yes I rather have a written specail menu

                2 Replies
                1. No, it's not disruptive at all to me. When I eat out in a public place I assume there will be interruptions. It's inevitable.