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Ontario's Best Honey ?

PoppiYYZ Jul 25, 2013 07:46 AM

In an effort to avoid imported and mass blended honey, I have been trying producer sold honeys.

Some producers have three and four types of single flower honey (buckwheat, clover, linden, lavender,...), but I have found the multiflower or "wild" honey that the bees produce over the entire season tastes the most complex and the best.

Would you share the type and producer of YOUR favorite Ontario honey ?

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  1. jayt90 RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 25, 2013 09:24 AM

    I like clover (extra white) from the Peace River Valley. Loblaw had it last year as PC Organic, but I haven't checked this year, waiting for the July crop.

    I also enjoy the contrabass: Buckwheat from Northern Hives, Cookstown, Ontario, found at Skyland on Lawrence Av. East.

    A good general blend of SW Ontario white honey (Lambton County) is produced by Munro's, and often found in Sobey's. They use a fine grain crystal starter that they have kept going for 80 years.

    2 Replies
    1. re: jayt90
      PoppiYYZ RE: jayt90 Jul 25, 2013 10:54 AM

      Thanks jayt90,

      Ha, ha. Buckwheat honey is a love it or hate it thing ! I keep trying it, but still haven't found the love !

      I did a quick search and found Paradis Valley Honey Ltd. in the Peace River Region of Alberta and Peace River Honey Bees from Florida. Is one correct or is there another ?

      Really surprised any honey can be organic considering the treatments beehives receive (before and after the honey flow) and the huge kilometers wide foraging area they will cover.

      1. re: PoppiYYZ
        jayt90 RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 25, 2013 01:43 PM

        Peace River honey comes from a fertile sub arctic valley 400 km. north of Edmonton near Grand Prairie, and on into B.C. Probably too far north for grains, but canola is grown, and many pristine hectares of clover. There are several organic honey producers there, with the whitest honey found anywhere. I called it extra white above, but usually it appears to be water white, the highest grade in Canada and the U.S.
        Here is Suzuki's take on organic honey (first time I've ever linked to him, as we differ on wind turbines!) http://www.davidsuzuki.org/what-you-c...

    2. 5
      5andman RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 25, 2013 02:51 PM

      Check out: http://beegrrl.com/

      Great source and I believe located in the Roncy/Junction area.

      1 Reply
      1. re: 5andman
        happycamper RE: 5andman Jan 19, 2014 09:49 AM

        Got a 500g jar for $9 at Bivy on Dundas W.

        Delicious!!! Thanks for the tip!

      2. Otonabee RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 25, 2013 07:15 PM

        For me its Brian Hamlin's honey.

        He has hives on the Leslie Street Spit, the Toronto Island and a few other places. I know he sells at the Brickworks Garden Market, Fairmount market and a few other places. Since it is really quite wild flower honey, I find the flavour is really interesting. Also very local!

        http://www.withrowpark.ca/wiki/wiki.p...

        2 Replies
        1. re: Otonabee
          l
          LexiFirefly RE: Otonabee Jul 26, 2013 05:43 AM

          Does he sell pollen? I've been looking for some truly local pollen to help with these damn allergies!

          1. re: LexiFirefly
            Otonabee RE: LexiFirefly Jul 26, 2013 12:29 PM

            I would check with him, you never know!

        2. TorontoJo RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 26, 2013 06:17 AM

          I'm a fan of the honey from Rosewood Estates Winery. They specialize in mead, so keep their own bees on their property.

          http://www.rosewoodwine.com/pages/132...

          2 Replies
          1. re: TorontoJo
            PoppiYYZ RE: TorontoJo Jul 26, 2013 06:27 AM

            Thanks TJ, I have tried a couple of their blended meads, it's quite good.

            Will try the honey too next time.

            1. re: TorontoJo
              Otonabee RE: TorontoJo Jul 26, 2013 12:30 PM

              A second to Rosewood. I have been using their liquid honey and it is very nice. The winery is absolutely lovely as well!!

            2. PoppiYYZ RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 26, 2013 06:29 AM

              Apparently, the Winner of First Prize at the 2012 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair for honey was :

              believe it or not,

              The honey from in the Roof Top Garden of Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York. They reportedly they have had 6 hives for 5 years.

              Very Weird.

              2 Replies
              1. re: PoppiYYZ
                jayt90 RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 26, 2013 06:50 AM

                There has been quite a bit of press about the Fairmont Royal York hives. The bees find lots of flowers and few weeds, so that must influence the taste. I would suspect they gather traces of pollution, too. That might be a good thing in pollen, for allergy resistance.

                1. re: PoppiYYZ
                  Otonabee RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 26, 2013 12:31 PM

                  You can actually go up the rooftop garden & bee hives for a tour. Very worthwhile to see!

                2. earthygoat RE: PoppiYYZ Jul 26, 2013 04:06 PM

                  Purple loosestrife honey from Campbell's Honey House in Warkworth is my favourite, but they have several varieties sold in bulk. They are only open for a couple of months a year and should be open in a couple of weeks with their first honeys of the year. I'll be bringing my jars and stocking up for the year!

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: earthygoat
                    jayt90 RE: earthygoat Jul 26, 2013 04:22 PM

                    It is good to hear that loosestrife has been redeemed and revered. I recall when environmentalists and Ducks Unlimited declared war on purple loosestrife, although it it is a favorite of bees, monarchs, and other foragers.

                    1. re: jayt90
                      earthygoat RE: jayt90 Jul 26, 2013 05:18 PM

                      They were worried about not getting enough loosestrife honey a couple of years ago because of a beetle released to control the plant. I don't think the beetle has made a big dent in the loosestrife population. Now they just worry about how many hives will be lost each year to the insecticide issue.

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