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Paula Deen's deposition

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Details of a deposition in which Paula Deen made some rather startling admissions about racial jokes amongst other things.

http://www.nypost.com/p/pagesix/paula...

  1. "According to the Enquirer, in the deposition, Deen replied “Yes, of course,” when asked if she used the n-word.

    Deen also reportedly admitted telling racist jokes, explaining: “It’s just what they are — they’re jokes…most jokes are about Jewish people, rednecks, black folks…I can’t determine what offends another person.”"

    What a pig that woman is ...

    2 Replies
    1. re: C. Hamster

      "most jokes are about Jewish people, rednecks, black folks"

      "Most" jokes? No. "Many" jokes? Yes. I will come right out and say that among my friends and family, I have repeated jokes I have heard about these minority groups. I have not done it with coworkers or in "mixed" company, though.

      1. re: C. Hamster

        Yet calling her a "pig" is acceptable...hmmmm

      2. I think Paula Deen is just a product of her time. If true, do I hold it against her? No. And I'm not a big PD fan.

        26 Replies
          1. re: hyacinthgirl

            "She's not 150."

            No she isn't, but a 66 year old person who grew up in the south when she did would have been around adults who probably told these types of jokes and to her they were just part and parcel of the type of humor around her.

              1. re: ttoommyy

                Maybe, I don't know. My in-laws are all from the deep south and in their 60's and they've never joked like that in front of me. That's just my experience, but I'm a 30-something yankee.

                1. re: ttoommyy

                  That was then. This is now. You hope to learn from history and NOT repeat it. She obviously is dumb as a post and hasn't learned shit.

                  1. re: ttoommyy

                    What ttoommyy said.

                    I'm Asian and primarily date Caucasians. Several were from the south (Texas, Georgia, Wisconsin, off the top of my head) and used similar language. These guys were ages 23-33...

                    1. re: ttoommyy

                      This is very true. But you would think that she would learn by now that it's not acceptable under any circumstances. It's amazing - people love this woman. Wonder what food network will do.

                      1. re: wincountrygirl

                        I hope they will get rid of her but I doubt they will.

                        I don't recall who said this but if she wants to use language like that she needs to limit it to home use. But she's in a position of power and I'm sure has gotten away with it for so long that she feels she can do and say whatever she wants.

                        She's recently revamped her cooking approach, she can now use some education regarding race relations, decency, respect.. And bubba? I'm not sure what can be done about that one.

                        1. re: youareabunny

                          Her power comes from the public, if they continue to support her, maybe food network will keep her, but then we have a far more serious problem. I just can't believe that we will continue to support this person.

                          1. re: dolly52

                            This did make breaking news so I hope that people wise up.

                            1. re: dolly52

                              I believe like many a "fallen" public personality she'll be dropped/less visible for a while, do some image rehab and then come back.

                              1. re: cresyd

                                True. Her next special will be a fundraiser for a black charity.

                        2. re: ttoommyy

                          I am a forty year old Southerner and I hear these types of jokes or people using that word all the time... It is not uncommon among natives.

                      2. re: miss_belle

                        I'm 64, so I grew up at the same time as Paula Deen, with some of those years spent in the Deep South. If I had ever used the n-word or made a racist joke in my father's hearing, he'd have nailed my hide to the wall. Anyone who claims that using that word or telling racist jokes is socially acceptable behavior is clueless. (Unless your social circle consists entirely of low-life bigots.)

                        1. re: pikawicca

                          Exactly, Pikawicca. I'm 50, my parents are 75 and both from the deep south. I would have had my mouth washed out with soap (literally--I can tell you what Dial tastes like after calling one of my brothers an a-hole) for using a racist or other bad word.

                          1. re: pikawicca

                            Same here. I'm 46, and I have an older sister the same age as Deen. My mother is from Mississippi, is 88, and I have never, ever heard her use the N word or tell a racist joke, And it never would have been acceptable for me or my siblings to do so. I have lived most of my life in the South, and I can say that Deen's behavior is not socially acceptable in my generation, hers, or my mother's.

                            Low-life bigots, as Pika so aptly calls them, exist everywhere. I have run across them in the North, and in other countries. Deen's comments are reprentative of low-life bigotry, not Southerness.

                            1. re: MelMM

                              Thank you. I was born and raised in NC but now live in Philadelphia and I've heard more racist nonsense in the 10 years I've been up here than I can remember hearing in the first 25 years of my life in the South.
                              My first generation Irish-American grandfather lived his entire life in upstate NY and had slurs for everyone who wasn't Irish.
                              Then there's Europe - black soccer players are regularly taunted with bananas and ape grunts and other nonsense.
                              Don't make this about the south, there are jerks everywhere.

                              1. re: caganer

                                Individual racist acts are everywhere, sure, but the south tends to have institutions in place that foster these sentiments. Eg. Segregated Georgia prom.

                                1. re: youareabunny

                                  one example does not equal a regional tendency

                              2. re: MelMM

                                Same here. Born and raised in the South, in a family that has always been in the South (since 1660). No one in my family would ever use the kind of language Paula Deen has admitted to using. I certainly have relatives who are less-than-enlightened when it comes to racial and ethnic differences, but they still know well enough not to use certain words or make certain jokes outside the privacy of their homes and company of like minded people. It's hard enough to get stuff done in a rural community, nobody can afford to build a reputation as a bigot because no one else would do business with them.

                            2. re: miss_belle

                              Sure, if I heard her say the "n"-word as a 6 year old girl in the 50s, I might accept that that's just how everyone around her talked, how could she know any better. As a 66 year old woman in 2013, not so much.

                              One responsibility of adulthood is recognizing and reflecting on behaviors that we may have inherited from our upbringing and deciding if that's who we really want to be. PD must have noticed at some point since her childhood that the "n"-word has become the most offensive and taboo word in American English. If she still continues to use it, it's not simply because she is a product of her time, but because she has consciously decided that she's OK with that. In fact, she seems downright proud of it.

                              Do I hold it against her? Absolutely.

                              ETA: The Enquirer and the NYP seem to have exaggerated PD's "startling admissions"…

                              1. re: miss_belle

                                Paula Deen is the same age I am, meaning she's part of the generation that turned its back on this sort of thing. Most of us did, anyway. I wouldn't cut her any slack for being a southerner. Even the South has changed, and Deen can choose to be part of the New South or the Old South.

                                1. re: GH1618

                                  That was my thought. She was twenty years old in 1967. Which side was she on?

                                2. re: miss_belle

                                  My late grandmother was a product of her time. She didn't like black people (except the ones she knew personally -- they were friends). She didn't understand why people got so bent out of shape over the N word.

                                  She was in most respects a lovely woman, and in spite of that I loved her dearly. But she was in no way fit to be a corporate employer with those attitudes. Deen's "boys will be boys" attitude towards this whole thing shows that she's not fit to be an employer. She needs to put all hiring and employment decisions in the hands of a capable HR company, stat.

                                  1. re: JonParker

                                    That's the most important part.

                                    It's one thing if it's a case of "gee, Grandma might say some racists things - but she's older and at this piont there's just no changing her", when bringing a new partner/friend over to dinner.

                                    It's another thing to be a corporate employer. That's where the real problem lies. She's a corporate employer. If she wants to go home and use all sorts of offensive, prejudiced language - fair enough. But having a "family business" mentality does not mean you can get away with behaving exactly as you would do at home.

                                    1. re: JonParker

                                      I suspect that your grandmother was of a generation before Paula Deen's.

                                      This is absolutely unacceptable for a public figure who was young during the civil rights struggles.

                                  2. Wow. What can you say? I blame Gordon Elliot for "discovering" this vile woman and creating her fame..

                                    And ttoommy, I feel sorry for your "friends and family."

                                    3 Replies
                                    1. re: jennyfur

                                      "And ttoommy, I feel sorry for your "friends and family.""

                                      No need to, as they have also repeated such jokes. Sorry, it's a fact of life for me. I'm not saying I go around telling them left and right; but if I hear a funny one and I know the group is intelligent enough to go beyond the supposed
                                      "hatred" behind the joke and see it for what it is, then so be it. I have heard hundreds of "gay" jokes said aloud and in "mixed" company. I'm not offended (and I'm gay). Many great comedians have made their careers on racist jokes. Just depends on the way one looks at the world and how serious one takes such jokes. I'm not saying it's for everyone. I'm just saying that I am not above it.

                                      1. re: ttoommyy

                                        IMO some of these people should take some time out of their day and visit a military barracks.

                                        They would be shocked to hear Black, Latino, White, Indian, and Asian enlisted Soldiers and Marines openly laughing at each other about who cracked the best racial, ethnic, national, religious, gender, sexual, personal, and familial slurs and jokes.

                                        1. re: deet13

                                          Deet, there is a reason military humour is tough and often crude. That doesn't make it acceptable in civilian life.

                                    2. The original comment has been removed
                                      1. I'm sure I've retold some "you might be a redneck if..." jokes in my time. At least she admits to it.