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11" skillets vs. 10 and 12 inches...

I'm looking at the Demeyere Proline 11" skillet. There is also a 12.6 and a 9.5......do you think the 11 be a good replacement for both a 10 and 12 inch...or should I consider both the 11 and 9.5? Thanks!

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  1. Your personal needs should answer that question for you.

    We can all say yes or no, but that answer would come from "our" needs...not necessarily yours.

    Good luck!

    2 Replies
    1. re: JayL

      True, perhaps I should have worded my question differently. I have never used or seen an 11 inch (considering an online purchase), so was hoping those who have had experience with one can tell me if they tend to reach for it when they would have normally reached for a 10 inch or a 12 inch. Or, if they have an 11 inch, do they still find themselves wanting to use a smaller pan, like a 9.5?

      1. re: kimbers324

        Even cooking for just myself, I find I like a large pan. I use the 32cm De Buyer country pan a lot and an ~11 inch skillet for most things. An 8" non-stick skillet is really too small for anything other than a pair of medium size eggs IMHO, two jumbo eggs just make one big egg "patty".

        With Lodge cast iron, I'm most likely to use the 12" skillet over the 10". With the Demeyere Proline skillet, I grab the 11" model most. Non-stick, I'm testing a new larger model - so far so good.

        Over time, I learned a partially filled large skillet is better than an over-filled smaller skillet.

    2. Some time ago I bought an 11" French skillet because a 10" skillet I had been using was too crowded for what I wanted to do. The 11" is significantly larger because it is a little higher as well as wider. But I still use a 10" or 9" pan when it's the right size. I like having lots of pans and wouldn't want to use my 11" for everything.

      BTW, Chef's Resource has an closeout sale of the Proline. Use code "cook20" today only for an extra 20% off.

      2 Replies
      1. re: GH1618

        Thanks for the tip! I ordered the 11" Demeyere and 9.5 Viking skillets.

        1. re: kimbers324

          It's a sickness .... ;-)

          I started out with a single Demeyere Proline 5 star skillet. Now I have another one and 2 additional pieces. The same thing happened with the De Buyer steel pans, I bought a starter pan and now have so many Mineral pans I don't have the exact number (though I have the right pan for each job now!).

      2. Hi, Kimbers:

        Unless cooking in your 12" is near-to-capacity, I would stay with something that fits your hob, that is to say, smaller than that. I have a LC 12" that is all but uselessly big.

        It also depends somewhat what you are cooking on. Demeyere is a little cagey when it comes to its TriplInduc-based pans. If you listen closely to the audio track of this video, you can hear them twice qualify their puffery on using "premium" induction hobs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsdObJ...

        Another thing to remember is that the effective cooking area of an 11" skillet is about 8", which is the largest size of a typical home hob. So if you need to brown reveles larger than 8"...

        For the way I generally cook, one 11" would be fine.

        Aloha,
        Kaleo

        4 Replies
        1. re: kaleokahu

          I guess it really depends on what you are cooking, how you cook, and how much. I wouldn't call a 12" Lodge CI skillet "uselessly big" for example. That size works well for me with 2 hamburger patties or two steaks.

          "Puffery" or not, those Demeyere Proline skillets heat evenly, even on an undersized burner at reasonable heat levels. Sure, I'd love to have a working 12 inch burner but I have had good results with an 8 inch if I wait for the skillet to heat up before I start cooking. On high heat, you will loose some of the evenness though.

          1. re: Sid Post

            Hi, Sid:

            For me, the uselessness of the LC 12" (and now the 15") inheres in its poor conductivity. It's >100F different between center and edge of floor.

            I'm sure the Proline skillets *do* heat more evenly. I took the Demeyere disclaimer about "premium induction hobs" as a warning not to expect great evenness on low-budget induction hobs. Why else would they make such a disclaimer?

            1. re: kaleokahu

              I never did get an induction burner, but the Demeyere Proline skillets are the bomb! They are fantastic on my gas stove! They heart very evenly and quickly - I love them. I have a number of Demeyere Atlantis cookware pieces and although they cost a small fortune, I am so thrilled with the cooking results, and I am glad that I did get them.

              1. re: laraffinee

                Hi, Lara:

                Good on you. Demeyere Atlantis is a heavy favorite for best clad anywhere. I think the disclaimer was just their polite way of saying "Don't blame us if these pans don't shine like in our video on a cheapo induction hotplate."

                Aloha,
                Kaleo

          1. Obviously, everyone has different needs. However, you can always start with your 11" skillet and then find out how it will work out for you.

            1. Something to keep in mind with the Demeyere Proline 5 star skillets is that their sides are not flared as much as most skillets so the central cooking surface is greater for the same size pan. The 12.6" model is really huge, it cooks much larger than a 12" Lodge cast iron skillet for example. The 11" Demeyere matches my 12" Lodge CI pretty well in cooking capacity in my uses.

              They are really SUPER skillets for those times you want a really good stainless steel model. They heat very evenly even on an undersized burner/coil and heat all the way to the edge. A true joy to use IMHO.

              37 Replies
              1. re: Sid Post

                I'm not certain if you can help, I'm looking at the Demeyere Atlantis line, I was wondering if you or someone else could help me find these measurements:

                I'm looking at the Demeyere Atlantis 12.6 inch Proline pan and was wondering, when measured on the inside bottom of the pan (Not the outside/back of the pan or the top diameter or measuring any of the curved edge) what does the bottom diameter measure in inches (Only the flat surface area)? I also was wondering the same information for the Demeyere Atlantis 4.2 quart Saute pan.

                I know that you may only have the 12.6, but any information would be appreciated or advice on someone who you may know that owns the 4.2 quart Saute pan so I can ask them.

                Thank you ahead of time for helping me out and thank you to anyone else that can help me too.

                I also wanted to say:

                "They are really SUPER skillets for those times you want a really good stainless steel model. They heat very evenly even on an undersized burner/coil and heat all the way to the edge. A true joy to use IMHO."

                That's exactly what I'm looking for and I share your enthusiam for such a product, I'm really glad to hear it's such a joy.

                1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                  I put a tape measure to my large pan. It read 12.0 inches from edge to edge (across the helper handle to the handle). The truly flat portion is 8.5 inches but, that is VERY misleading. The sides slope very gently to the edge and then flare up pretty straight and vertical (where a Lodge cast iron skillet has a flat side and sharp edge where it meets the flat bottom). The rounded flat bottom to side junction really adds to the cooking area.

                  1. re: Sid Post

                    I agree that the rounded flat bottom side junction truly adds to the cooking area, thanks for the measurements they're perfect. Kaleo sent me a link to a Demeyere PDF, but when they measure the base they're measuring the outside bottom, not the inner truly flat portion like you just did for me.

                    This is a huge help, thank you for replying; I really needed this.

                  2. re: KungPaoDumplings

                    The Demeyere 4.2 quart sauté pan is straight sided and the inner diameter is 11 inches. The smaller sauté pan diameter is 9 3/8 inches.

                    I have the 11 inch and 9.5 inch Proline skillets and that is the measurement of the top of the pan diameter. They have a smooth slope and heat evenly all the way to the top of the pan, unlike any other pan I have, even my copper doesn't heat up to the top like that. Their sauciers don't heat up to the edge like that so you can get a gentle reduction.

                    These are really good pans. I paid beaucoup bucks for all the pieces I have, even on sale, but I don't regret it and instead, am glad that if finally got this quality of cookware.

                    1. re: laraffinee

                      Thanks for the information!

                      How far up do their sauciers heat?

                      The more I hear about these pans/Demeyere the more I love them.

                      What does "beaucoup bucks" mean?

                      I'm really glad to hear you love them and they're so worth it for you. I'm getting exstatic thinking about having my own with every conversation or insight someone gives.

                        1. re: kaleokahu

                          It's interesting, not even the Multiglide Granite is as thick as a Proline pan.

                          Any thoughts on why that is?

                          It certainly is a good read bytheway.

                        2. re: KungPaoDumplings

                          The sauciers don't go all the way up like the Prolines do. They are made to gently evaporate and that is what they do. The Prolines will sear all over the sides and up to the edge, so if you are searing a thick piece, it does it so well. I have cast iron and carbon steel that I love for high heat, but they just don't sear like this.

                          I got most of mine at Cutlery and More and usually with a sale coupon, but some of the pieces were still $329 and such which I consider beaucoup bucks. The first piece I got was the 9.5" Proline pan which was on special for $100. Once I tried that, I was so hooked, and have added piece by piece until now I have all that I could need. If you get a coupon from them and they have the intro pan special - that is the best way to tell if this cookware is what you want.

                          1. re: laraffinee

                            If the sauciers don't heat all the way up the pan, how far does the heat actually go in your experience?

                            1. re: laraffinee

                              "I have cast iron and carbon steel that I love for high heat, but they just don't sear like this."

                              Just to clarify: you find that your cast iron/carbon steel don't sear as well as the Proline pans?

                              What does the word "beaucoup" mean? (That's what I was trying to ask in my previous reply, I'm sorry if I wasn't clear enough).

                              Ironically enough your 9.4 inch Proline pan is currently on sale for $150 at Cutlery and More.

                              I keep hearing about people getting one, getting hooked, then buying everything they need (Usually slowly), and loving it, it's a great thing to hear.

                              How do you get a coupon from them? Do you just mean the onsite see on the website (Cutlery and More) sales, or are you talking about an actual coupon as well as the sale price they often have?

                              I'm glad you're so happy with your set.

                              1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                I don't know where you live but, assuming you are CONUS (USA), sign up for Cutlery and More's emails and you can score some good deals over time. I just got a Super Slicer I have wanted for a long time for what I felt was a good price. I also got 3 of my Demeyere Atlantis pans (both skillets and one other) from them. I have an open inquiry for the Plancha and keep my eye on the Maslin "jam pot". I have purchased my Staub cast iron from them and Williams and Sonoma. The De Buyer pans have come from any different sources (all recognized "major" web store sites).

                                1. re: Sid Post

                                  Does CONUS mean Continental United States?

                                  And yes, I live in the USA currently.

                                  Do their e-mails give extra deals or do they just inform you when a current sale is up on the website? Like do they ever send extra coupons or is this more like a newsletter of current sales? Either way, I'll certainly be signing up, that will be a help meet in filling out my collection after my initial buying.

                                  What type of slicer: a mandolin or a deli slicer?

                                  What exactly is an "open inquiry"?

                                  What is a Plancha?

                                  I know they are called jam pots, but do you know anything else more about Maslin pots? I tried searching for them on Wikipedia just to get a rough idea, but nothing came up. I also tried Google, but essentially just found a bunch of jam recipes. I'm curious where they originated and if they are good for anything else (Besides jam making). What are you looking to use the Maslin pot for?

                                  1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                    http://www.demeyere.be/Default.asp?CI...
                                    Teppanyaki/Plancha
                                    Larger pieces of meat or fish or larger quantities of food are best fried on a Teppanyaki/Plancha. Put the griddle on two rings on the hob or in the oven. This way you can prepare delicious ‘gambas à la plancha’ or you can fry several steaks, sole, vegetables, smaller snacks etc. With the Japanese ‘teppanyaki’ method you can prepare strips of fish, meat, vegetables, just fry with a little bit of fat and shortly after, finish off with a marinade or (syrupy) sauce.

                                    http://www.demeyere.be/Default.asp?CI...
                                    This large pot with special handle and perfect pouring edge is ideal for fruit or seafood preparations. A practical pot/pan to make jam or prepare a number of lobsters. This maslin pan is delivered with a stainless steel lid and is suitable for all cookers, including induction.

                                    I added this knife to my "collection":
                                    http://www.cutleryandmore.com/henckel...
                                    I also have a mandolin and deli style slicer. I wanted this knife for use with larger cuts of meat I want to slice (I'm shopping for a smoker http://langbbqsmokers.com/lang36/inde...) for family gatherings. Picture carving a turkey, slicing a smoked pork shoulder, prime rib ....

                                    Cutlery and More emails are best for catching things that are on sale or closeout. If you are diligent about searching their website and check it frequently, you can get the same deals. I find their emails to be great reminders that prompt me to consider a "good deal".

                                    1. re: Sid Post

                                      Oh, I know that as a Teppanyaki pan, I see. What is “gambas a la plancha”? And what are you looking most forward to cooking on it? Also, what do you see yourself using it for personally?

                                      I never knew the name of those pots even though I’m very familiar with them (I’m British and making/eating large amounts of jam is hereditary), I just knew them as jam pots. What are you going to use your Maslin pot for? Do you often make jam or are you looking to make lots of seafood? (I like that you’re excited to bring these things into your collection; I get excited too about a nice pan or a certain type of pot I’d love to have, it’s nice to share that).

                                      That looks like a lovely knife to do the job and the family gatherings you’re going to have sound very enviable! In the next couple of years I’m going to start seriously forging into my own Charcuterie and I will be looking for a deli style slicer, any suggestions?

                                      Okay, so it’s a newsletter style. That is certainly helpful; I need to get on signing up for it. Thank you for the information!

                                      1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                        "What is “gambas a la plancha”?"

                                        Spanish style grilled shrimp. Think of tapas along the coast on vacation....

                                        "And what are you looking most forward to cooking on it? Also, what do you see yourself using it for personally?"

                                        I'm thinking about it for outdoor summer time grilling. If I have a Weber charcoal grill or smoker going, I can use this for small things that would fall through the grill grate or place it somewhere warm or hot for appetizers while the meats finish cooking (I could cook things on a clean firebox top, assuming it is plate steel and not pipe, but, how do I serve it?). I see it mainly for fish, shrimp, vegetables, and "tapas" style snacks for outdoor entertaining where I can cook and serve directly from it.

                                        "What are you going to use your Maslin pot for? Do you often make jam or are you looking to make lots of seafood?"

                                        I like the bail handle for easy transport and easy pouring. The large capacity also has a place for stews and soups. While I don't currently do a lot of seafood living in the desert, I do see myself doing shrimp boils and other seafood style things on vacation or at my friends retirement place (~80 acres with a great pond full of fish and lots of wild game). With an abundance of black berries at my mother's place, some black berry jam is likely as well.

                                        "In the next couple of years I’m going to start seriously forging into my own Charcuterie and I will be looking for a deli style slicer, any suggestions?"

                                        Familiarize yourself with the local restaurant suppliers. A used commercial machine will serve you well if you produce enough to justify the size of the machine and expense. The "cheap" slicers at the various big box retail stores don't work well enough to worth the lesser price in my limited experience.

                                        1. re: Sid Post

                                          “Spanish style grilled shrimp. Think of tapas along the coast on vacation....”

                                          Sounds lovely.

                                          What is a firebox top?

                                          Sounds like a great plan on how to use it, it also sounds like it is going to get a lot of use; I hope you get one in time for next summer. Oh, you never answered what an open inquiry is, sorry to ask again.

                                          That gives me a lot of ideas for when I get a Maslin pot, although I mostly will be making jam in it myself.

                                          “Familiarize yourself with the local restaurant suppliers. A used commercial machine will serve you well if you produce enough to justify the size of the machine and expense. The "cheap" slicers at the various big box retail stores don't work well enough to worth the lesser price in my limited experience.”

                                          I’ve heard the same exact advice from someone else and I completely agree. Any advice on how I go about finding my “local restaurant supplier”?

                                          1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                            "What is a firebox top?"

                                            http://www.gatorpit.net/backyard_pits...

                                            The square "box" where you put the wood is the firebox.

                                            1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                              "Oh, you never answered what an open inquiry is, sorry to ask again."

                                              Sorry about that, so many questions and posts ... looks like I missed/forgot that one.

                                              My normal preferred source doesn't have the Teppanyaki/Plancha pan in their inventory so, a request was made to see if their distributor could get one. My inquiry resulted in an inquiry with the distributor to see if they could fulfill my request for a Teppanyaki/Plancha.

                                              1. re: Sid Post

                                                It's more than all right, I know I've been asking/replying so much and it's always easy to miss something.

                                                That makes a lot of sense, I hope they can get it for you!

                                              2. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                                "I’ve heard the same exact advice from someone else and I completely agree. Any advice on how I go about finding my “local restaurant supplier”?"

                                                Well you are in the USA so, that's helpful. Assuming you live in a large city, go to the phone book and look up the commercial restaurant suppliers. If that doesn't yield good results, next time you eat out, ask the chef or front of house manager who they use or recommend. Another option would be to speak with a "real" butcher or a deli shop owner/manager.

                                                1. re: Sid Post

                                                  I sadly don't live even remotely in a city, nor do I have any real butchers, or deli shop owners around.

                                                  I currently live in Southern NH where there isn't a whole lot of these types of resources.

                                                  I guess I'll have to ask one of the only real restaurants in town.

                                                  Any other thoughts? Thanks for the help as always, I'm really glad you're here on CH bytheway (I told this to Kaleo and Duffy, but I've been meaning to tell you). You make being on CH informative and enjoyable.

                                                  1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                                    I feel your pain, living in Arizona now. If I want anything significant it normally results in a drive to Phoenix. In a remote area, your only real option is to travel to a larger city after making some phone calls to pre-screen sources for what you want.

                                                    I would watch ebay and craigslist (close to where you live) to see what is available for a good price. Patience will pay off eventually if you have cash in hand. I got a commercial coffee grinder that way.

                                                    1. re: Sid Post

                                                      I was considering driving to a larger city after making calls, so I'll put that on my list for certain now.

                                                      I'll keep my eye out on both sources, thank you; I often forget they exist.

                                                      What would you consider a good price for a used commercial deli style slicer? I don't even know where to begin on price, brand, and model numbers. I'll have to search these forums, I hope to come up with something tangible. Congrats on the coffee grinder!

                                                      1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                                        The online suppliers like Katom and others are a good place to start to see what is available in the new market. New, prices will run in the $2500~3500 range. Used but clean, I would expect prices to be about 50% of new. I would guess you are looking at $1500 plus or minus a few hundred dollars when one turns up from a closed deli or butcher.

                                                    2. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                                      I used to live in Southern NH, so I know well how isolated it can be - beautiful, but isolated. I used to go down to Boston for specific purchases and made a day of it, but I was just an hour and a half from Boston, so it wasn't so bad and I had a lot of favorite places and people in Cambridge so it was a fun trip. Boston will have everything.

                                                      1. re: laraffinee

                                                        I'm sadly 2 hours away from Boston and the I can't afford to make the trip. I agree it would have everything I need though.

                                2. re: laraffinee

                                  Hi, laraffiee: "They... heat evenly all the way to the top of the pan, unlike any other pan I have, even my copper doesn't heat up to the top like that."

                                  Yes, they should heat evenly and to the rim--they have approximately 4.5mm of aluminum inside!

                                  I'm curious, though, what thickness of copper frypan you are using for comparison. 3mm of copper should easily best 4.5mm of Al in evenness.

                                  These Proline pans are quickly becoming the Thermapens of frypans--standards of excellence.

                                  Aloha,
                                  Kaleo

                                  1. re: kaleokahu

                                    Hi Kaleo,

                                    Well, I have not cooked with the two pans side by side, but I am comparing it to the 3 mm copper Mauviel rondeau tin-lined.
                                    I bought one during a Williams-Sonoma 20% off cookware sale, as did my sister. We were cooking together at her place, and although the rondeau was a great pan, it did not impress me enough to keep it and I returned mine before I even used it. Most of my copper is tin-lined 2 mm, with some pretty 1.5 mm Ruffoni thrown in.- I know, I know.

                                    We made a lentil vegetable stew in the rondeau and it was great. But - you have to keep the heat moderate with the pan. No searing.

                                    The best comparison to the Proline is carbon steel or cast iron, which you can crank up the heat, and again, I have not run two pans side to side, which would be the best way to test, but the Proline heats on the sides just like it does on the bottom. If someone has a laser type thermometer,I bet that can be tested and shown.

                                    I love these pans and I am really happy to have them to cook with, but I truly maintain that a great cook can make a great meal with the cheapest cookware. When I was a student, i cooked with aluminum and cheap stainless and great meals were enjoyed by many. So, a Demeyere pan is a fantastically engineered piece of cookware, and I love it, but if it is not in someone's budget, then there are other good choices out there.

                                    1. re: laraffinee

                                      Great technique always surpasses the hardware used.

                                      Great hardware and poor technique, bad food. Bad hardware and great technique, the best food you will ever eat.

                                      1. re: Sid Post

                                        Good technique and great hardware = best most people will ever cook.

                                        1. re: kaleokahu

                                          So true, Kaleo!

                                          A great violinist can produce beautiful music with any violin, but you put a Stradivari in his* hands and MAGIC happens.

                                          ....and so it is with a cook and his* tools.

                                          (* his/her ... as artistry is not gender specific)

                                          1. re: laraffinee

                                            *their

                                            (It's gender neutral. I'm not being corrective, I just thought this might help you : ) )

                                            1. re: KungPaoDumplings

                                              Thanks, KPD!

                                              Yes, that is better said. It does matter to me to express myself clearly, and I do appreciate it.

                                              1. re: laraffinee

                                                You are very welcome laraffinee!

                                                I'm really happy that helped you so much, anytime.

                                  2. re: laraffinee

                                    Each pan is custom designed for the function intended.

                                    A saucepan is not a dutch oven, A conical sauteuse is not a sauté pan. Now, a 3.5L conical sauteuse and 3.5L dutch oven are similar but, even they are not the same however, the differences were so small I waffled over which one to get.

                                    At a very gross level, some pans are basically a modified disc bottom and others heat all the way up to the edge of the pan. Which one you want to use depends on what you are cooking.

                              2. An 11" skillet is big enough for my purposes, so I don't have any that are 12". If you cook for a sizable family, the extra inch might be better for you.

                                I also have a 10" skillet and use it as often as the big one, such as for omelets. For me, then, an 11":skillet would not be a good replacement for a 10-incher.