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Breading for liver and onions

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I'd like to use seasoned breading for the liver -- is there a traditional set of flavors for this? Would grocery seasoned salt be good?

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  1. breaded liver? calf's? this is news to me (excepting chicken livers of course)

    on 2nd thought though, it might help avoid the dreaded dry liver that haunts my childhood.

    1 Reply
    1. re: hill food

      Well, pressing into seasoned flour or crumbs, not with egg and milk.

    2. I use Wondra or regular flour seasoned with salt and pepper

      3 Replies
      1. re: foufou

        I'm a Wondra fan as well

        1. re: scubadoo97

          Me too, but I don't season the flour with S&P - I season the flesh directly first, then dredge.

          1. re: Karl S

            That's how I do it as well.

      2. Like Foufou, I dredge in seasoned flour.

        1. those seasoned salts often contain msg, so i don't use them.

          1 Reply
          1. re: hotoynoodle

            Penzey's seasoned salt does not contain MSG and is very good....

          2. Seasoned flour and fried in bacon fat...

            2 Replies
            1. re: petek

              Oh wow. There are no words for how awesome this sounds. Yum.

              1. re: petek

                Second that! But you have to take your time. My mom always fried it too hot and too fast, although I ate it and liked it because I didn't know any better. She also declared pork liver to be inedible, which it would have been cooked like that. But many years later I was working up the street from a "meat'n'three" in Nashville, and every Thursday was pork liver with onions in gravy - braised, rich, succulent and tender. Just flat delicious.

              2. Hmm. This is news to me too, like HillJ. I am a HUGE fan of liver and onions (and bacon) first, because I LOVE it, and secondly because I tend to be iron deficient and can eat it self-righteously. :-)

                I don't bread it. I saute the onions (liberally S&P'd) in butter until they're carmelized, then the bacon, then fry the liver in the bacon drippings. I like the liver to be just a bit pink in the middle. Yummy with a glass of good light red wine.

                1 Reply
                1. re: pinehurst

                  This is exactly how I do it, except at the end where I deglaze the pan with dry sherry.

                2. but what liver is being questioned?

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: hill food

                    Great question! I like beef and chicken livers, but pork liver has a gamey taste to me. I had it only once and did not like the taste.

                  2. Yes to seasoned flour with a pinch of cayenne.

                    1. Never breaded liver. Not at all traditional in my culture. Quick flouring and into the pan. Nothing more. Same whether lamb's or calves liver.

                      1. Like others in the thread, I simply dredge in seasoned flour (cayenne/paprika/S&P) then saute.
                        Like Pinehurst, first caramalize onions in butter then saute liver. I'll remove the liver and deglaze with water to make a roux-y gravy with the onions, thicken, and top the liver with it.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: porker

                          me too, exactly. It is delicious.

                        2. I've had breaded liver but not with onions; it was pork liver coated with panko, deep fried and then thrown in with some nira chives as part of a liver and chives plate.

                          If I were making it, I'd be dredging in flour and doing caramelized onions with bacon lardons.

                          However, in the diners that still carry liver and onions on the menu, it's more of a pays your money and takes your chances. The last plate I ordered (Paul's in Mountain Lakes) had liver grilled until it was nice and grey and the onions were pan-fried - cooked yes, but no sweetness.

                          1. this may be inappropriate piggybacking on this post but curious as to what sides those of you who have posted traditionally eat with liver and onions....it is our tradition to eat this dish with rice and gravy....

                            3 Replies
                            1. re: foufou

                              The liver and chive was eaten with white rice.

                              In the times I've ordered North American-style liver and onions (as what's mostly described) it came with mashed potato or fries.

                              When I make it, I just eat liver and onions.

                              1. re: foufou

                                Always and only potato. Usually mashed, with whatever pan juices there are poured on top. But sometimes baked potato and sometimes leftover steamed potato tossed in the pan with the juices to crisp the edges a little, once the liver and onion have been removed.

                                1. re: foufou

                                  Wilted spinach is good with liver and onions. I personally quite like any potatoes with soft and juicy dishes to have a bit of crunch. Pommes Lyonnaise perhaps?

                                2. I've only ever used flour, and then s & P while in the pan with butter left over in pan after caramelizing a couple of big onions.

                                  And left a little pink in the middle.

                                  And the same for chicken livers, only NOT pink in middle. Those suckers will pop grease on ya, use a screen!!

                                  1. It depends on how thick you want the breading. Traditionally, the breading is just a dredging through flour that has been seasoned with some salt and pepper, and sometimes granulated garlic. If you want a thick chicken fried steak type breading, you would dredge it through the flour, then an egg wash, then flour again.

                                    1. Dredge in seasoned flour (S&P, garlic granules, cayenne), let it sit for about 10 minutes (while the bacon fries), then dredge again in the flour before frying in the bacon renderings.