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Cottage Food Law - It is legal to sell food you make at home

Hi

Posted this in another forum, but maybe this one is more appropriate.
Has anyone heard of this new law, the Cottage Food Law? It makes it legal for you to sell certain food products from your home to buyers.

Sounds interesting! What do you guys think?

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  1. That's going to be subject to different rules in each (US) state, I think.

    1 Reply
    1. re: GH1618

      and then further specialized by county and municipality.

      Depends on what you're selling and where you're selling it.

    2. Yea you're probably right. Would you buy or sell homemade food?

      1 Reply
      1. Here's a link to a summary of the cottage food laws across the country. It has not been updated yet to include California, new as of this year.
        http://www.theselc.org/wp-content/upl...

        7 Replies
        1. re: Melanie Wong

          I was going to say not in Florida, but I read your attachment first.

          This explains the sudden appearence of the blah cookie, muffin, and marmalade tents at the local non-farmers farmer's market.

          1. re: INDIANRIVERFL

            you've zeroed in on my biggest gripe with Florida and produce.

            "Farm stands" sell whatever they bought at the wholesale produce market some time earlier this week.

            "Farm markets" have wooden chickens and ducks, and door wreaths.

            Fresh, farm-grown produce is a challenge on a good day.

            1. re: sunshine842

              In the Twin Cities, the Minneapolis Farmers Market allows vendors to sell anything so there are vendors selling citrus, bananas, mushrooms, and even vegetables that are regularly grown in Minnesota. The St. Paul Farmers Market only allows vendors to sell what they produce. They will not allow vendors to sell products that are locally grown by someone else either.

              1. re: John E.

                It's some sort of state law designed to protect produce wholesalers in Florida -- and it's stupid, and I hope some state legislator with visions of glory in his/her eyes decides to take up this cause.

                It's pathetic that a state that produces such an enormous percentage of the country's tomatoes, green peppers, potatoes, corn, citrus, and beef isn't allowed to sell any of it directly to the people who live here and fund the agricultural subsidies.

                I haven't been to Mpls -- but the producers' market around the Capitol in Madison, WI is a thing of beauty and definitely something for other states to aspire to.

                1. re: sunshine842

                  "It's pathetic that a state that produces such an enormous percentage of the country's tomatoes, green peppers, potatoes, corn, citrus, and beef isn't allowed to sell any of it directly to the people who live here and fund the agricultural subsidies."

                  Wow, there is actually a Florida law saying that the people that grow the food cannot sell it directly to the public? In Minnesota, we have a lot of families where their main source of income is selling vegetables at the Farmers' Markets around the Twin Cities. A majority of them are Hmongs who came to Minnesota from SE Asia in the years following the Vietnam War.

                  The St. Paul Farmers' Market began in 1853, 5 years before Minnesota became a state.

                  http://www.stpaulfarmersmarket.com/ab...

                  The Minneapolis Farmers' Market is located under a freeway overpass and just is not as authentic as the St. Paul version, in my opinion.

                  1. re: John E.

                    Yes, it's a Florida law.

                    I have a good imagination, but even I couldn't make up that kind of crap.

          2. It varies greatly from one municipality to the next. I investigated this for my area. I have indoor pets so that ruled me out!

            1. These rules vary by state and municipality.

              If you do sell food prepared in your home you should have plenty of liability insurance and you should homestead your house.

              1 Reply
              1. re: C. Hamster

                Yes about the insurance. At least $2,000,000 minimum is what I recommend.