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deBuyer Clearance!

Sur La Table has marked down their "Tim Love" deBuyer pans. These are essentially Mineral B, but note that deBuyer shows MB pans at 2.5mm thick compared to SLT stating their pans are 2.3mm. Still, killer prices; $50 for the grill pan, $60 for the chef's pan.

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

You're welcome. :)

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    1. re: DuffyH

      Thanks. They do look closest to the DeBuyer Mineral B series -- approximately the same thickness and coated wtih beeswax. :)

      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

        The SLT Tim Love pans are significantly less than De Buyer, so do they perform the same?

        1. re: monavano

          They should. They're virtually identical to Mineral B.

          MB are listed at 2.5mm thickness. TL are listed as 2.3mm. That's the only difference I can see. They have the same beeswax coating.

        2. re: Chemicalkinetics

          Hi, Chem,

          I ordered the 12", and I'm glad now it took me forever to decide which pan I wanted.

          I wonder if the pan base has a little map of Texas where the bee is on the B line. :)

          1. re: DuffyH

            <I'm glad now it took me forever to decide which pan I wanted. >

            :) Congratulation

            <if the pan base has a little map of Texas where the bee is on the B line>

            Ha ha ha.

        3. re: DuffyH

          Hi, Duffy - Good deals.

          What can I do with one of these that I can't do with an All-Clad frypan of the same size?

          1. re: Jay F

            Good morning, Jay -

            The short answer is; nothing. The better answer is that they replace non-stick.

            Take delicate fish, for example. I always pan-fried it in NS, because in my SS pan it would be prone to tearing. Eggs are WAY better in carbon steel. I've done them, fried and scrambled in SS, but it takes way too much fat and scrambles still stick.

            They function the same as cast iron, but with less weight, and they're virtually non-stick after the first seasoning, because they're smooth.

              1. re: DuffyH

                Ditto! And, for some reason eggs do taste waaay better in a well seasoned carbon steel pan.

                All other issues - hey, what she said.

                1. re: breadchick

                  Even in my not-so-well seasoned pan the eggs are better. Must be a French thing, from the pans. :)

                  Which reminds me. Why does no one order two eggs in France?

                  1. re: DuffyH

                    Because one egg is an oeuf.
                    (avid West Wing fan here. Go Margaret!)

                    1. re: monavano

                      DING! DING! We have a winner!

                      Margaret was so under-appreciated. One of the better comedic actresses on WW. :)

                      1. re: DuffyH

                        Margaret's comedic timing was spot on, and Leo's straight man routine was the perfect foil.
                        RIP John Spencer. Miss that show. Brilliant.

                        1. re: monavano

                          Remember the blueberry muffin nutrient list that crashed the WH computers? LOL

              2. re: Jay F

                Give and take. Each cookware design has its strength and weakness. There is no "perfect" design -- at least not for all kind of cooking.

                All Clad stainless steel cladded cookware will likely have better heat distribution and chemically inert, but DeBuyer carbon steel is a lot more nonstick and can take on higher heat too.

            1. Thanks for posting this. I've never heard of these pans. They look like pro/restaurant pans.
              For any pan owners, how is the upkeep, clean up and long time wear on these?

              2 Replies
              1. re: monavano

                <For any pan owners, how is the upkeep, clean up and long time wear on these?>

                These are carbon steel pans. In term of upkeeping, they are just like any carbon steel pans which are similar to cast iron cookware in this regard.

                1. re: monavano

                  My Mineral grill pan, which I use almost solely for hamburgers, is a snap to clean. I just soak it in hot water, add a couple of drops of liquid dish detergent if it's greasy, then scrub with a stiff bristle brush which I got at SLT. Then I put it over a flame for half a minute and wipe it dry with paper towels.

                  The initial seasoning (after cleaning) is with Crisco shortening, the same as I would do for cast iron.

                2. Does anyone have the 13" Chef's Pan? How do you like it?

                  4 Replies
                  1. re: monavano

                    My son has the 14" DB Force Blue country pan, which is the same item, but slightly larger. He loves it, cooking for a family of 6.

                    It's much too large for me, usually cooking for 2. And heavy? Oh, yeah. Even in the thinner Force Blue (2mm) it's quite heavy. IIRC, it's also too big to season in a standard 30" oven, because of the long handle. Don't quote me on that.

                    1. re: DuffyH

                      Ah, my friend DuffyH, if it weren't so big, wouldn't this be a love to own, especially without a big handle to deal with?

                      http://www.finestcookware.com/catalog...

                      And, even though I'm in a household of two now, why do I want this pan?

                      Because it's just so pretty. (Sigh.)

                      1. re: breadchick

                        BC -

                        It *is* a lovely pan, no question. I've not fallen in lust with it because it reminds me of my 14" SS pan, but with shallower sides. I am *so* not in love with that pan.

                        I do believe this is one case of familiarity breeding contempt. Which means more for you to lust after. How many/what pieces of CS do you own now?

                        1. re: DuffyH

                          Four Carbone Plus pans. Two 12 inch skillets, one10 inch skillet, one crepe pan. Definitely enough, especially considering the amount of other cookware I own!

                  2. Thank you very much for posting this. I have been on the fence about buying the 12" mineral B, problem solved

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: bkultra

                      I've been dithering for several months. Seeing this deal last night finally made me jump. Got the 12" fry pan.

                      And Mom always said I was wasting my time cruising cooking store websites. :)

                    2. That seems like a good deal. I think I paid more than that for my 10" Mineral grill pan. I use it often, to fry a hamburger (one at a time). I don't know if you could make two at once in the larger pan, but it would be better for large steaks.

                      1. http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

                        The 13" country pan is $59.99. I have the de Buyer model and love it.

                        47 Replies
                        1. re: Sid Post

                          Sid, what do you use the country pan for, and how often? Do you cook for a crowd?

                          I've never got much use from my SS chef's pan, although I'll sometimes use it for deep frying, or for a sauce if my saucepans are in use. Got it on sale at TJ Maxx for $30, Calphalon try-ply, thought I'd figure out what to cook in it. Never did, though. For pan sauces, I use one of my fry pans, and for the rest, it's my saucepans or Dutch oven. Am I missing out on something?

                          1. re: DuffyH

                            Think of it like you would a flat bottom wok or deep skillet.

                            The deep sides work really great at keeping "splatters" in the pan and off the stove top. Pan frying like you see with the deep Le Creuset skillets with an oven finish works extremely well. With something I want to flip or stir (not soup, heavy vegetables, rice, etc.) the rounded tall sides keeps everything inside the pan. The heat retention also helps on a weak stove coil. It really is a versatile pan and I find myself doing a quick breakfast steak or pork chop fairly often in it (my fry pan creates more splatters so, it takes more clean up).

                            I rarely cook for what I would call a crowd. However, about 25% of the time I cook extra for a meal or two at work during lunch. Normally, I will cook 2, maybe 3 portions of protein and about the same for vegetables, beans, and/or rice. This pan has me eating less calories, more nutritiously, and cheaper then I would if I ate out. Plus, when I get home from traveling it's nice to eat home cooking without tons of hidden butter and sugar.

                            1. re: Sid Post

                              Thanks, Sid.

                              If I understand correctly, you're saying that this pan is good not just for large quantities of food and frying, but also for things like sautéing a veg side for two people?

                              Going through this process of needing new cookware has me also re-thinking which pieces to buy. You've got me considering for the first time the benefits of a chef's pan. It sure seems like I could replace my go-to 4.5-qt saucepan with one. Maybe the thing to do is place the saucepan off-limits for a few weeks and see what happens. We're such creatures of habit!

                              BTW - I want to thank you and the rest of the 'Hounds who so patiently put up with and respond to my often-rambling posts. These discussions really help me with decision-making, even though I take forever to make up my mind. :)

                              1. re: DuffyH

                                I have the DB Cheff's pan - best stovetop cookware item I own. I leave it on top of the stove because it works for just about everything even though it's a bit large and heavy. I think DB makes the Tim Love pans any way.

                                SLT has good deals here and there.

                                1. re: Rigmaster

                                  DB does indeed make the Tim Love pans. Looks like it's Mineral B. My frypan should arrive Wed. Film at 11!

                                  Thanks for mentioning that you keep your chef's pan on the stovetop. It seems like a versatile pan. What size do you have?

                                2. re: DuffyH

                                  Your welcome Duffyh!

                                  "If I understand correctly, you're saying that this pan is good not just for large quantities of food and frying, but also for things like sautéing a veg side for two people?"

                                  YES! I use it a lot for just myself. I have over filled single pans more than once but, I have "never" under filled this large pan. It just plain works, whether one pork chop or several, one potato or most of a bag, etc. Got a bit of olive oil and some random vegetables? No problem.

                                  "It sure seems like I could replace my go-to 4.5-qt saucepan with one. Maybe the thing to do is place the saucepan off-limits for a few weeks and see what happens. We're such creatures of habit!"

                                  It doesn't have a pouring lip so, I wouldn't use it for anything thin. It's also a large heavy pan with a helper handle which isn't good for pouring either. While I don't use it for stews or sauces, I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work well in this role except that I prefer pans with pouring rims. If you ladle most of the contents out, weight goes down considerably and wiping the last bits out with a silicone spoonula would be pretty easy. Yes, sometimes it is worthwhile to take your most used pans and set them aside and try something else. After all how else would you ever learn there is a better pan if you only use your favorites? My favorites have varied over time as I learned new things. Without setting aside my old favorite, would I ever find a better pan? Hence my conversion from LC to Staub, Lodge to De Buyer, insert any number of options here to Demeyere Atlantis.

                                  "... even though I take forever to make up my mind. :)"

                                  Making the 'right" decision the first time is always best. That involves a lot of consideration and second thoughts. I could have bought my Demeyere Atlantis several times over had I skipped All-Clad and several other lesser brands.

                                  A large pan like this one has it's place. And it's not just for large families and large events. It really works well on smaller jobs too though, I won't be doing a single egg in it anytime soon.

                                  1. re: Sid Post

                                    For the past few weeks, the pans I find myself washing the most and the ones constantly on the stop top are:
                                    a 1 1/2 quart stainless steel saucepan
                                    a 2 quart stainless saucepan
                                    an 8 inch ceramic skillet
                                    a 32cm De Buyer country pan

                                    My crepe pan is nearby in the oven. Everything else is put away for "special occasions".

                                    The "Country Pan" has basically replaced my Lodge cast iron skillet, De Buyer fry pans, and various large stainless steel pans for most things. I really love my Demeyere Atlantis pans but, I find I use the Country Pan more then any of them.

                                    The pressure cooker, Demeyere Proline 5 skillets, Demeyere Atlantis pans, and Staub have their place but I'm finding they aren't "everyday pans" like they were prior to this purchase.

                                    1. re: Sid Post

                                      Sid - Incredibly helpful, thanks!

                                      < It just plain works, whether one pork chop or several,...>

                                      But will it hold 2 chicken breasts, or 2 fish fillets? Most of the protein I cook on the stove top belongs in those 2 categories; meat goes on the grill, because MrH is a manly man, and meat needs fire (insert caveman noises). Cod and mahi mahi will fit, I'm sure, and maybe some small-ish halibut, but the chicken worries me, as does another favorite, flounder. Salmon goes on the grill. Dude was raised in Seattle, where salmon is like meat.

                                      <That involves a lot of consideration and second thoughts. I could have bought my Demeyere Atlantis several times over had I skipped All-Clad and several other lesser brands.>

                                      Been there, got the t-shirt. That's exactly what I'm trying to avoid this time around. One of my goals as I switch to induction is to reduce the number of pans I own; paring it down to what is really useful, with as many as possible multi-tasking. Do I really need 2 roasting pans? No. I use my SS DO a lot in winter for soups, but haven't used my big stockpot in almost 2 years. That's one I won't bother to replace. And what's with the 14" deep frypan with 2 helper handles? That's only been used when I've got a lot of fish or chicken to sauté. I could easily batch those, or use 2 smaller pans. I sure won't miss the monster domed lid that only fits THAT ONE PAN.

                                      My one worry about the deBuyer country pan is the weight AND sheer size. I have a hard enough time with the 12" Lodge skillet I've been trying (stolen from MrH's camping stuff to try out). I'm trying to envision myself wrestling with that long handle and big bowl.

                                      You've got deBuyer frypans, are they deep enough to take over frying and biscuit duty from the Lodge skillet? I know the sides are flared, which might present a problem, but maybe I could make it work if the depth is there. That skillet weighs a ton!

                                      1. re: DuffyH

                                        <But will it hold 2 chicken breasts, or 2 fish fillets?>

                                        It is a good solid 9" across the bottom before the sides start. Two pretty generous leg quarters will fit if you arrange them right. While I haven't done big pieces of fish in it, yet, a 9" inch fillet is pretty big where I come from and if you add a little length to the sloped sides, you could go 11" without too much difficulty. Hmm, maybe I need to photo a couple pork chops or buy some more chicken.

                                        <My one worry about the deBuyer country pan is the weight AND sheer size. I have a hard enough time with the 12" Lodge skillet I've been trying (stolen from MrH's camping stuff to try out). I'm trying to envision myself wrestling with that long handle and big bowl.>

                                        Yes, it is a REALLY LARGE pan. And, it does weigh as much as a decent size sack of potatoes. It does tend to dominate the small 4 coil stove I have right now but, do I really care when I only need ONE PAN for dinner? Or this pan and a small saucepan or two? I find it handles better for me then a 12" Lodge cast iron skillet which I guess is due to the longer handle which I seem to control better. There is no getting around its large size and weight. The handle does clear adjacent pans so, it's not as bad as it could be (think about the French tops and high handled pots you see in Paris kitchens).

                                        "You've got deBuyer frypans, are they deep enough to take over frying and biscuit duty from the Lodge skillet? I know the sides are flared, which might present a problem, but maybe I could make it work if the depth is there. That skillet weighs a ton!"

                                        Yes, the De Buyer fry pan is a closer match to the Lodge cast iron skillets. Personally, I find I like the higher sides of the country pan because it contains the "splatters" better, not to imply the fry pan or skillet are bad, the country pan is just better. Think about bacon or sausage "pops", less clean up with a deeper pan but, not huge deal either. Heck, I've done bacon and steaks on my crepe pan. For biscuits, french toast, etc. the lower sides of the fry pan are an advantage but, that's why you have one of the De Buyer crepe pans isn't it? Compromise on a skillet/fry pan or do a crepe and country pan. Oops, you want fewer pans, now more but, look at what's in my kitchen (or at least on the stove top and stored in the oven)..... :-D

                                        1. re: Sid Post

                                          Sid -

                                          <I find it handles better for me then a 12" Lodge cast iron skillet which I guess is due to the longer handle which I seem to control better. >

                                          I agree on the Lodge. Mine has a helper handle that makes it easier to wrestle the pan over to the sink; it's an absolute bear to pick up by that stubby little handle.

                                          <Compromise on a skillet/fry pan or do a crepe and country pan. Oops, you want fewer pans, now more but, look at what's in my kitchen (or at least on the stove top and stored in the oven)..... :-D>

                                          My Tim Love 12" frypan arrives today. Having and using the pan will allow me to do hands-on evaluations and likely lead to the next decision, your chef's pan or ChemicalKinetics wok. Since any wok I buy will be flat-bottom, there will be much similarity, with base size being the biggest difference.

                                          1. re: DuffyH

                                            For what I "think" you want, the wok is an inferior choice. The larger flat base will allow you to cook your chicken and fish in one or two large pieces. It will also retain more heat for searing proteins (pork, chicken, beef) due to the greater mass. Even though it is a large pan, my "enormous" country pan stores easier than a comparable size wok because the sides are more 'vertical' and it's not as tall as the wok.

                                            I have owned or was given the wrong wok several times. I did eventually buy a steel wok but, I could not get enough heat into it to cook the way I wanted. Wok's are relatively cheap so, it's easy to try one and give it away if it doesn't work (hence, my aluminum, stainless steel, teflon woks .....).

                                            FWIW, someday I'm going to use a turkey fryer and a good steel wok and see what I can do with better heat.

                                            1. re: Sid Post

                                              <For what I "think" you want, the wok is an inferior choice>

                                              I'm not sure. Today, what I "think" I want is some kind of CS pan for delicate foods and tossing veg.

                                              I still have concerns about the number of acid-based pan sauces I make. When I began purchasing CS, my goal was to replace my non-stick, and that remains my primary motive. Currently, I use NS to sauté fish and veg, stir fry, for multiple servings of hash browns and for scrambled eggs. That's really about all.

                                              Does CS have an advantage over SS for stovetop chicken or pork cutlets? I'm willing to be convinced, but don't really see it now. But then, I haven't cooked them in a CS pan yet. I've always done them in SS. I don't think there's an inherent advantage to SS, I've thought of them as equals. We don't do steaks, chops and such indoors, those belong on the grill, according to the caveman. He loves pan sauces for lean protein like chicken and pork tenderloin, not so much for chops and steaks. Hence the grill.

                                              1. re: DuffyH

                                                I am jumping in again.

                                                As for flat bottom wok vs country fry pan, they are similar. Some flat bottom woks look just the same as some country fry pans, so I would look at the pan dimension and see what fits your need. A pan with a larger flat surface is better for cooking large pieces of meat, like Sid Post has said. A pan with a deeper and curved side is better for tossing food and stirring food, but more difficult for some utensils to get underneath and flip large food items. For example, it is easier to stir chopped up meats and vegetables in a deep flat bottom wok, but more difficult to flip an egg (because the high side can make it difficult for the turner to get underneath the egg)

                                                <Does CS have an advantage over SS for stovetop chicken or pork cutlets?>
                                                Yes in some aspect. Chicken of pork cutlets would stick less to carbon steel pans. On the other hand, like you have said, stainless steel cladded cookware can easily handle acidic sauces. Of course, nothing is absolute. You can cook chicken and pork cutlets in a stainless steel pan without sticking. It just takes a bit more oil or a bit more timing. You can, of course, use many acidic sauces in a carbon steel pan. You just have to use a very well seasoned carbon steel pan and keep the time minimal.
                                                flip large item. For example, it is easier to stir foods in a deep flat bottom wok, but more difficult to flip an egg (because the high side can make it difficult for the turner to get underneath the egg)

                                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                  CK - Thanks for chiming in. Please keep doing it.

                                                  This - <Of course, nothing is absolute. > - is absolute truth, and the crux of my problem. I may be trying to cull the herd too much. Of course I'll keep my crepe pans, and hub's 12" CI skillet. But the rest... well, I've got so many frypans now that it's easy to grab exactly the right size pan for the job at hand. Choosing a wok or country pan is difficult, because I currently own neither.

                                                  When it comes to pan frying and pan sauces, I want to be Baby Bear, and have it be "just right". This is especially true for the sauce; the pan can't be so small that I can't attack the pan to deglaze it without flinging liquid everywhere, and it can't be so big that the sauce reduces to nothing in the blink of an eye.

                                                  Now, a case can be made for pan-frying a lone chicken breast in a 12" frypan or country pan, perhaps using extra liquid to deglaze. But this feels silly to me. Likely because I'm so used to having the perfect size pan.

                                                  <You can cook chicken and pork cutlets in a stainless steel pan without sticking. It just takes a bit more oil or a bit more timing.>

                                                  I've (mostly) got the oil and timing down, but I do make errors from time to time, usually heat-related. I find the idea of an initial sear on higher heat with less fat very attractive. If I did choose an acidic sauce, then it would make sense to quickly deglaze and move everything to another pan to finish, adding the protein back in to simmer and finish in that pan. It would also alleviate a lot of the timing issues. Even if I'm deglazing with broth or water and not changing pans, that quick sear followed by a simmer would give me a lot more space between moist and overcooked.

                                                  Some of this is undoubtedly the fault of my current cooktop and it's slow response time. If I've got another pan or 2 going, it's not always possible to move my protein off the heat to prevent overcooking. Let's not even get into the nasty things it can do to fond.

                                                  You do realize that even as you're helping (a LOT!), you're not making it one bit easier for me to decide which pan/s to buy? :)

                                                  One last query, if I may... I'm returning the 12" Tim Love (Mineral B) pan because it's just too damn heavy and has no helper handle. You've got Force Blue. Assuming you've got one of the larger sizes, do you hesitate to crank the heat to high? I like the lighter weight, but fear warpage in a 12". Wouldn't a slower warm-up, say a few minutes at medium before turning up the heat, make warping less likely? Or I could get over myself and spring for a Carbone or Mineral B with the extra handle. They do have helper handles on the big ones, yes?

                                                  Okay, that was 3 questions. Sue me. :)

                                                  1. re: DuffyH

                                                    <Choosing a wok or country pan is difficult, because I currently own neither.>

                                                    Well, the country fry pan is probably a safer choice. You can always get a $10-20 carbon steel wok later. Carbon steel woks are fairly inexpensive.

                                                    <you're not making it one bit easier for me to decide which pan/s to buy? :)>

                                                    :) You can always think outside of carbon steel and stainless steel too. I read many people claim that anodized aluminum cookware is less prone to food sticking than stainless steel. If so, then it is a slightly less sticky cookware than stainless stain which you can use acidic sauce. You may want to post another question (thread) about this option as well. :D

                                                    <One last query, if I may... I'm returning the 12" Tim Love (Mineral B) pan because it's just too damn heavy and has no helper handle. >

                                                    Really? I didn't read all the posts. I was going to ask you how you think about it, but I guess I know now.

                                                    <Assuming you've got one of the larger sizes, do you hesitate to crank the heat to high?....>

                                                    I do have a Force Blue and it is thinner and therefore lighter. However, it is more prone to warping. Mine has. On the other hand, I don't care because a slightly warped pan works just fine on a gas stove or an electric coil stove. However, it won't work well on an induction cooktop or a smooth glass ceramic cooktop. I forgot. What kind of cooktop do you have?

                                                    <Wouldn't a slower warm-up, say a few minutes at medium before turning up the heat, make warping less likely? >

                                                    Yes, but I fear this will happen sooner or later.

                                                    <They do have helper handles on the big ones, yes? >

                                                    I believe the answer is maybe. I believe there are some DeBuyer big pans with helper handles, and some don't.

                                                    There is another thing about the "heaviness" of the pan. Sometime people don't notice this, but the heaviness feeling of a pan also is related to comfort level. If a slightly more comfortable handle can make you feel the pan is lighter. Moreover, you can grab your pan handle much closer to the pan itself with a towel. Try to warp a small kitchen towel onto your Tim Love pan and grab it closer to the pan, and see if it helps. It may not, but it will just take a few seconds to try.

                                                    If this towel thing works, then we can think of other alternative to beside a towel.

                                                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                      <You can always think outside of carbon steel and stainless steel too.I read many people claim that anodized aluminum cookware is... >

                                                      Nah, my new cooktop will be induction. That's what all this decision-making is about. But it may be that I need to get over my hatred of disks and find a decent aluminum disk pan. I've read that disk pans don't easily warp. I do like my Tramontina aluminum pans, they've got a very good weight. Hate the Teflon, but perhaps a similar uncoated pan would work. Excellent suggestion. Time to do more research. I know! Disk-bottom lightweight CS?

                                                      <What kind of cooktop do you have?>

                                                      Smoothtop now, next year... see above. :)

                                                      <the heaviness feeling of a pan also is related to comfort level. If a slightly more comfortable handle can make you feel the pan is lighter.>

                                                      I have noticed this. I weighed all my current pans today and I think a lot of it is not so much handle comfort, but the leverage you alluded to when you suggested choking up on the handle. My 10.25" Carbone crepe pan weighs less than my 12" clad frypan by 6 oz, but feels far heavier. I attribute that to weight distribution. Pans with heavy, solid handles may have better distribution than CS pans with their relatively light handles. That's where a helper handle would come in handy.

                                                      <I do have a Force Blue and it is thinner and... more prone to warping. Mine has.>

                                                      I thought you'd mentioned this before, so I had to ask. The weight issue is what makes a wok or smaller country pan attractive to me. The smaller base means they're less likely to warp, allowing me to step down in thickness. I routinely crank the heat up to 9-10/10 with my 4.5 qt clad saucepan to make popcorn, and after 11 yrs it's still pancake flat. Calphalon is good clad stuff, but it's not THAT good. That it hasn't warped has got to be a combination of pan thickness and base/wall ratio, which is very high when compared to a similar frypan.

                                                      <Try to warp a small kitchen towel onto your Tim Love pan and grab it closer to the pan...>

                                                      Ok, did that. Even choked all the way to the pan edge, I can still barely bring it up to vertical. For a pan that heavy, a helper handle is apparently a must for me. The 12" CI skillet weighs 2 lbs more, but moving it is a breeze with the extra handle.

                                                      Hmm, perhaps my best bets would be a disk-bottom fry pan and a country pan. But not Sid's monster. I'm thinking maybe a 12" FB. Smaller base, sure, but no rule says I can't cut chicken and fish in half to fit the pan. The presentation police will have kittens, but so what?

                                                      1. re: DuffyH

                                                        <my new cooktop will be induction>

                                                        I see. In which case, most anodized aluminum won't work (non-magnetic). So forget that one.

                                                        <The smaller base means they're less likely to warp>

                                                        Is that true? I am not sure.

                                                        <For a pan that heavy, a helper handle is apparently a must for me. >

                                                        I know many professional cooks use these kind of clip on handles:

                                                        http://www.amazon.com/Primus-Pot-Grip...

                                                        http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/west-h...

                                                        Probably not what you are looking for, but I am sure there are many ways to go about this, including many other options.

                                                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                          On warping: <Is that true? I am not sure.>

                                                          Have your woks warped? One presumes they're a thinner gauge than Carbone/Mineral. While it's true I don't own a wok, I've yet to read a review that complains of warping. If you think about cookware that's warped, how often do you see someone complain of a warped saucepan? And what item is most prone to warping? Metal sheetware.

                                                          In anything taller than a frypan, the 4" (or more) tall metal cylinder surrounding the flat base has to aid greatly in warp prevention. That cylinder won't easily twist, which is all warping is, after all. Try it with a paper cylinder and you'll see what I mean. Of course, woks and chef pans don't have cylindrical walls, they flare. But the wall/base ratio is still quite large.

                                                          1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                            CK - I don't think I could ever trust those lifters. They seem designed for lighter weight pans.

                                                            I've been looking at aluminum cookware this morning and so far can't find any uncoated induction pans. And, as expected, most of the others show signs of wear after about a year.

                                                            Perhaps I'm going about this backwards. If I consider what I sear on the stovetop, it's only 3 things, flaky fish, chicken, and pork cutlets. The fish is best kept intact, cutting it only encourages disintegration. I reserve cooked sauces for grilled heartier fish, preferring simple seasonings for the flaky stuff. Chicken and pork are almost exactly the opposite. It doesn't much matter if I cut a piece of chicken in half; the pork is already pretty small. I often make pan sauces for seared chicken and pork.

                                                            Given these differences and my lack of arm strength, it's becoming clear that one pan to do it all may be a pipe dream. My 11" Carbone crepe pan can take high heat and has a 10" base, which is fine. Fish could be cooked on it. It might even be the superior choice with low sides that will make the fish easier to flip.

                                                            With fish out of the way, we're left with chicken/pork and tossing veg. The 12.5" FB country pan has an ~9" base. That's a decent size for chicken. Pork will fit fine. It might even work for fish, although flipping could be a problem. But is it too heavy for tossing? I'm guessing yes. But it has a helper handle, so I'll be able to lift it easily. It's shipping weight is 5 lbs, some of which (a pound?) will be the box, I think. It's possible I can toss in it with 2 hands, but if not, I can pick up a smaller one (nesting pans is always nice) or a flat-bottom wok later.

                                                            The remaining question is, will it warp? I'm not sure. It's only 2mm thick. The height is 3.5" for ht/base ratio of ~1/2.5. Is that enough? Dunno, but a similar base frypan has a 1/4 ratio. Am I likely to crank the heat all the way to high? Likely not needed since the pan isn't super thick. It's a puzzle.

                                                            1. re: DuffyH

                                                              The DB chef's pans aren't for flipping/tossing - way too heavy even though I can do it with ease. It just doesn't make sense. I do have a flat-bottom wok if I need to flip. As for cooking fish, I cut them to size if necessary. In most cases though if I need it to be fully intact, I use a cast iron griddle that fits on a full-length burner on my stove. I don't flip that either. I also use that burner for poaching fish in a fish poacher, but the poacher is aluminum and wouldn't hold up to searing heat.

                                                              Now for thinking outside the box, if the fish isn't too long, I just use a cast iron jfajita skillet. This works just as well, and you can find these skillets anywhere for a decently low price. You can't toss fish on them, but you can easily fit big pieces and flip them using a fish spatula.

                                                              1. re: Rigmaster

                                                                Rigmaster -

                                                                <I use a cast iron griddle that fits on a full-length burner on my stove. I don't flip that either.> You made me spit tea out my nose! :0

                                                                More to the point, I may still have my cast iron griddle, it'll take a deep dive to find it. It just never occurred to me to use it for fish. I got it when we lived near Puget Sound, where fish = salmon we'd caught ourselves. It was always grilled or steamed on the barbie.

                                                                <if the fish isn't too long, I just use a cast iron jfajita skillet.> I have a similar item, but it's round. Diameter is ~10", about the same as my Carbone crepe pan. I could use those interchangeably for fish, but can't see an advantage to the CI, because again, thin fillets cook pretty fast and the thick stuff gets grilled.

                                                                I've just recently raided Dude's camping gear and am slowly learning when to use CI. I do think the CI crepe-ish pan will be great for biscuits, but his 12" skillet is way too big for cornbread. But I just might be able to make decent fried chicken for the first time in my life. :)

                                                                1. re: DuffyH

                                                                  "You've got Force Blue. Assuming you've got one of the larger sizes, do you hesitate to crank the heat to high? I like the lighter weight, but fear warpage in a 12". Wouldn't a slower warm-up, say a few minutes at medium before turning up the heat, make warping less likely? Or I could get over myself and spring for a Carbone or Mineral B with the extra handle. They do have helper handles on the big ones, yes?"

                                                                  I just had this conversation with my mother. I gave her my Force Blue and Carbone One De Buyer pans. She has arthritis so, less weight was a big factor there. She complained about the wobbling; Why? She puts them on HIGH (highest heat setting on her new cooktop) to warm up and the turns the heat down to cook.

                                                                  My big Country and Fry pans have helper handles and are from the Mineral line. I have not noticed them warping or wobbling but, I also heat them up on medium heat. The thinner and smaller pans (24cm) DB pans didn't so much warp as expand due to heat in the center of the pan while the rim was still room temperature. Slow heating keeps thermal expansion more consistent over the entire pan so you don't get bowing in the flat bottom.

                                                                  My big pans are not good for tossing food, even with the helper handle, due to their weight. Turning, flipping, stirring gets the job done for me. The greater thermal mass is great for searing meat, especially with a hot pan and room temperature dry chicken, pork, etc.

                                                                  A crepe pan works great for things other than crepes. With no sides, moisture can escape easily so crispy things are even crispier than similar items cooked in a tall sided pan. Of course, this issue is basically moot if you use room temperature proteins that are patted dry before cooking.

                                                                  My mom also commented that the crepe pan I gave her was excellent for quesadilla's. She also commented that the size was perfect for breakfast eggs, typically omelettes. I believe it is the 24cm Force Blue version.

                                                                  Like a wok, a cast iron comal or griddle is pretty cheap. For ~$15 you could "test drive" one and see how it works for you and your cooking technique.

                                                                  1. re: Sid Post

                                                                    Great info, Sid -

                                                                    <She puts them on HIGH (highest heat setting on her new cooktop) to warm up and the turns the heat down to cook.>

                                                                    The only time my crepe pans have been on high heat is for the initial dry heating prior to applying the first seasoning layer. Since then, they've not been heated past 7/10, so med-high. Both are still flat, even the small FB, although to be fair, it usually only goes to 5-6/10. The bigger one is Carbone, I've no fear of higher heat for it.

                                                                    <My big Country and Fry pans have helper handles and are from the Mineral line. I have not noticed them warping or wobbling but, I also heat them up on medium heat.>

                                                                    So they go to medium and stay there, yes? And IIRC from past posts you routinely sear chops and steaks?

                                                                    <The greater thermal mass is great for searing meat, especially with a hot pan and room temperature dry chicken, pork, etc.>

                                                                    Before you gave your FB to Mom did you do any searing? How'd it work out? Was there enough heat retention/recovery do get the job done easily? I cook my proteins the same way, dry and room temp.. Do you add oil when you're searing, or do it dry?

                                                                    <A crepe pan works great for things other than crepes.>

                                                                    I've noticed! My smaller 22cm FB is primarily used for one egg, but my 26cm Carbone crepe pan has a base that's ~9". I use it for eggs, grilled sandwiches, quesadillas, hash browns, and such. I've yet to sear protein in it, but that's likely because I'm afraid of stripping the seasoning. I've got to get over that. Earlier this week I sautéed some cod, drizzling a bit of lemon juice over the fish before flipping it. I did it in a non-stick pan for fear of stripping the crepe pan to bare metal.

                                                                    <Like a wok, a cast iron comal or griddle is pretty cheap. For ~$15 you could "test drive" one and see how it works for you and your cooking technique.>

                                                                    I have a round Lodge cast iron griddle, haven't used it for much yet, because I'm still new to it, so don't quite trust it yet and because I REALLY hate sticking. It's a newer Lodge, but we did cook off the seasoning, sand it smooth and apply new seasoning. It made excellent hash browns the other day. Same story for Dude's 12" CI skillet. That one is so big that it's not as useful to me as a smaller one would be. Tropical Storm Andrea made our temps plummet to 79º yesterday, so I made chili and cornbread, but I'd have had to make a double batch of the bread to cook it in that skillet. I ended up using my usual muffin tin. I can get an 8-10" skillet for ~$15, no problem. Then the big one can go back into storage with the camping gear. Dude will like that. Anyway, I'm still learning how and when to use the cast iron. The seasons (such as they are here) are working against me now. I've moved much of my cooking to outdoors, and have largely switched to salsas, salads and fruit to accompany protein. We tend to crave lighter food when it gets hot out.

                                                                    1. re: DuffyH

                                                                      “<My big Country and Fry pans have helper handles and are from the Mineral line. I have not noticed them warping or wobbling but, I also heat them up on medium heat.>
                                                                      So they go to medium and stay there, yes? And IIRC from past posts you routinely sear chops and steaks?”

                                                                      Incomplete wording on my part, cold empty pan that needs to be warmed up – MEDIUM heat. Most cooking – MEDIUM heat. Warm pan with food in it, HIGH heat to achieve desired results while standing over it and then back to MEDIUM heat to finish. HIGH heat on an empty cold pan – NO NO NO!!! insert smiley shaking its finger at you :-D

                                                                      High heat with food in the pan is fine for short periods of time. Unattended warming, heating or, cooking is medium heat only.

                                                                      “<The greater thermal mass is great for searing meat, especially with a hot pan and room temperature dry chicken, pork, etc.>
                                                                      Before you gave your FB to Mom did you do any searing? How'd it work out? Was there enough heat retention/recovery do get the job done easily? I cook my proteins the same way, dry and room temp.. Do you add oil when you're searing, or do it dry?”

                                                                      Yes, I did some searing occasionally but, I didn't really like the results I got. Heat retention was low enough I needed to rely on the burner underneath which wasn't very good. I typically use a little oil because I find it aids heat transfer and, if the protein isn't smooth it will sear more evenly.

                                                                      “I can get an 8-10" skillet for ~$15, no problem. Anyway, I'm still learning how and when to use the cast iron. The seasons (such as they are here) are working against me now. ”

                                                                      I find the 8” to be a little too small and crowded for most of my cooking. It is a good size for a couple of breakfast sausage patties though. I think you will find the 10” to be a better general purpose model. If you fry in it a few times, the seasoning will come along nicely. Bacon and Sausage, fried potatoes, and fried chicken come to mind easily. Or, take some peanut oil and a paper towel and an oven at ~375 a few times.

                                                                      1. re: Sid Post

                                                                        Thanks again for good RW info, Sid. I'm struggling just now with the seasoning on my Carbone crepe pan. Yesterday's breakfast hash browns stuck quite a bit. Perhaps it's time to fry some bacon.

                                                                        I'm going to play with that pan and my cast iron some more to see what I can master for best results. I may find I like CI better than CS, with it's slightly more finicky seasoning. My FB crepe pan that's only used for eggs and grilled sandwiches is perfectly non-stick, despite not being anywhere near well-seasoned. It's a keeper for sure.

                                                                        I looked at the 8 and 10" CI skillets at Walmart today and have to agree, the 10" is just right.

                                                                        Summer may be working against me, but time is on my side. I hope to have all my cookware needs figured out in time to score big with the holiday sales.

                                                                        1. re: DuffyH

                                                                          "I'm struggling just now with the seasoning on my Carbone crepe pan. Yesterday's breakfast hash browns stuck quite a bit. Perhaps it's time to fry some bacon."

                                                                          Were your hash browns cold? Was your pan at cooking temperature when you put the hash browns down? Was the crepe pan "dry"?

                                                                          Brand new, I would spritz the warm surface with a small amount of olive oil and then I would add room temperature hash browns. Let them sit until they move freely and then turn them over. They shouldn't be sticking.

                                                                          While harder to do on a flat crepe pan, one of my first DB fry pans was broken in using potato peels cooked in oil until they were burnt. I'm not sure about the chemistry and metallurgy involved but, that method sure worked well in that pan. Today, I'm a peanut oil and high heat guy though canola oil will work too if you don't mind the smoke.

                                                                          1. re: Sid Post

                                                                            <Were your hash browns cold?>

                                                                            Doh! Well, color me cooking-disabled! As a matter of fact they were cold. I prep them in advance and freeze in ziplocks. Silly moi was in a hurry and neglected to defrost them. Everything else was standard; hot pan, enough oil, etc... Won't be doing THAT again!

                                                                            I've seen that old seasoning recipe from DB, which has caused much confusion when other DB instructions say to boil peels in water to strip the coating, then season. Did you do both, or just the peels/oil burn-in? It would be easier than the standard seasoning I've been doing, because with the smoothtop it's much harder to get even results. I've dreaded having to season a frypan or country pan on the cooktop, and hate heating up the oven to do it.

                                                                            1. re: DuffyH

                                                                              I used some random cooking oil and potato peels in the pan as soon as I got to the kitchen with it. Beginer's luck or not, it worked like a charm for the, at the time, DB newbie.

                                                                              You can season with a propane grill or charcoal if you want to keep the heat outside. I have also seasoned on a cooktop which while harder to do, will give you good results once you get it figured out. In fact, my big Country Pan got a so-so job the first go round so, I had to do it again to get the job done.

                                                                              I also got a really good seasoning job on my Mom's cooktop with a 24cm DB fry pan. The key there was heating the pan up really good with a very thin film of oil. Really just barely enough to give it a shine in the light. I did this several times one evening and never looked back.

                                                                              1. re: Sid Post

                                                                                I could certainly season a frypan on the smoothtop, but if I choose a country pan it will be nigh impossible. We have a split grill, so that's out, too. It did a good job on the CI skillet. We had to strip a lot of crud off the skillet, too. Ran it through the oven's cleaning cycle overnight. Love doing that in the winter. It got us a 2-fer; a clean post-holiday oven AND a pretty bare metal pan.

                                                                                For a country pan my best bet will likely be frying the potato peels. I'm glad to know it worked. And it's stupid simple, too, another plus in my book.

                                                                                I'm still shaking my head over the frozen hash browns. I KNOW better. It's a brain cloud.

                                                                                1. re: DuffyH

                                                                                  "I could certainly season a frypan on the smoothtop, but if I choose a country pan it will be nigh impossible."

                                                                                  It's not that big of a risk and best of all, if you mess it up the first time like I did on that 32cm Country pan; a few minutes with a doobie pan and you are ready to try again. A smaller country pan would be even easier ;-)

                                                                                  Take the wax coating off, completely (where I messed up with the high rim), pour a small amount of peanut oil in a paper towel, wipe down and heat. The bottom and ~first inch of the side will turn a nice black color pretty easy with the color turning to brown towards the rim. Cook with it from that point on, the seasoning will develop naturally. Right now my rim has a nice dark golden brown color but, if I ever filled that monster to the rim, I'm sure it would turn black like the rest of the pan. At this point I consider it to be more cosmetic than functional because it is non-stick and shows no signs of ever trying to rust. My fry pans turned the oil black all the way to the rim.

                                                                                  "For a country pan my best bet will likely be frying the potato peels. I'm glad to know it worked. And it's stupid simple, too, another plus in my book."

                                                                                  The only negative about this method is the amount of oil and potatoes it takes. Talk about a monster set of hash browns the next morning ....... :-D

                                                                                  1. re: Sid Post

                                                                                    <Talk about a monster set of hash browns the next morning ....... :-D>

                                                                                    Well, yeah, but that's where the quart bags and freezer come in.

                                                                                    I won't mind sacrificing the oil for an easier seasoning process. BTW - what heat setting did you use? Did you heat the pan first, or start cold? Did you bring the oil to smoking, or just dump the 'tater peels in from the start? Input, please!

                                                                                    1. re: DuffyH

                                                                                      "BTW - what heat setting did you use? Did you heat the pan first, or start cold? Did you bring the oil to smoking, or just dump the 'tater peels in from the start? Input, please!"

                                                                                      With a fully loaded pan like that, high heat is okay but I would suggest a strong medium to bring things up to temperature a little more gently. Put the potato peels and generic "vegetable" oil in when you put the pan on the heat. Take the oil to just below smoking, sort of a shimmer and wait until the peels are basically black crispy burnt offerings. Turn the heat off and let it sit until the oil comes down to a warm "reasonable" temperature (cool enough not to hurt if you spill some or splatter on your skin while dumping it).

                                                                                      Also, don't forget safety with that much oil! Keep a large lid handy in case of a flare up and some loose newspaper and paper towels to soak up oil if the unthinkable happens and you have a mini-Valdez episode.

                                                                                      That should get you started off right. It will still need some cooking to really break it in but, this will give you a good start.

                                                                  2. re: DuffyH

                                                                    I've tried lots of things. The CI fajita skillet works. Just did blackened catfish for some friends and they were shocked because they'd never considered using a fajita pan for anything other than fajitas. I just preheat the pan for a few minutes and then I can do multiple pieces pretty quickly even if they're one at a time.

                                                                    As to the griddle, I have nonstick and CI. I prefer the CI because it's well-seasoned through lots of use so sticking isn't much of an issue.

                                                                    The advantage of the CI is that it excels at blackening and other "fry" methods without requiring deep frying. When I really want to sorta blacken but not quite I just throw a dome over the fish and it creates a blackened-steamed cook with no need to flip the fish at all.

                                                                    The one thing I've learned through the years with CI though is that it's far more versatile than you'd think. There's a reason it was the go-to cooking item for so many years.

                                                                    It's also gained favor with me because despite being so heavy, it's the easiest to clean. Literally just deglaze while it's blazing hot using a wok-scrubber, rinse, wipe clean, and re-oil most of the time.

                                                                    I'm a huge CI fan too because CI's practically indestructible. Can't think of a single one I've ever ruined. The only one I've ever seen someone else ruin was due to a crack from dunking a searing hot pan in ice water. This was a demo to show how CI could be damaged. Essentially a demo for someone explaining how the Liberty Bell crack most likely resulted from a microfracture inherent in the casting process.

                                                                    I've heard of CI cracking on induction, and that's likely due to induction burner's ability to come to high heat so much faster than CI pan's can absorb the heat.

                                                                    Scientifically, I learned that the vast temperate difference of a cold pan and high heat source causes the pan to expand faster than it's metal material's natural expansion would like, resulting in a "crack."

                                                                    1. re: Rigmaster

                                                                      Rigmaster -

                                                                      I'm glad you mentioned blackening. I've long been a huge fan of blackened fish, but haven't (so far) been able to recreate it at home using the grill. Ours just doesn't get hot enough. I can get something close, but it's just not quite there. That's one of the things that inspired me to dig out Dude's CI. I'm not a fan of strong-flavored fish, he is; serving it blackened makes us both happy, with the seasonings and sear muting the flavors that put me off.

                                                                      I'd not heard that induction can heat CI too rapidly, but will certainly take that into account and be sure to bring the pan to medium before cranking up the heat. Good tip, thanks.

                                          2. re: Sid Post

                                            Sid -

                                            <...with a helper handle which isn't good for pouring either.>

                                            Why do cookware mfgs think helper handles make it easier to pour from huge pots? Sure, they make it easier move the full pan, but we still need 3 hands to pour - 2 to hold the pan, 1 to corral the contents. I've tried pouring things from my DO while holding one handle, which can be done and would be easy, but the contents of the pan then flow out over the other handle, making a nice mess. What we need is a 3rd, offset handle that we can hold the pot with, so we pour over a nice clean rim, and not over a handle. Yeah, that'll happen in my lifetime. :)

                                            1. re: DuffyH

                                              <Why do cookware mfgs think helper handles make it easier to pour from huge pots?>

                                              Because they either don't cook themselves or, think the purchasing public is easily woo'ed with a useless feature (in many cases).

                                              <Sure, they make it easier move the full pan, but we still need 3 hands to pour>

                                              I had one pot with a pouring lip on the rim and two LARGE FLAT handles that I could hold with both hands and pour from, though I couldn't scrap down the sides or spoon out solids. These days, the helper handles tend to be thick round wire which are useless for anything other then supporting a large full pot.

                                              Yes, I too have tried to pour from one handle only to have liquid run all over the place as it poured onto the helper handle .... :-( what a mess .....

                                              1. re: Sid Post

                                                What we need is something with one loop handle. A bit of a spout opposite the loop wouldn't hurt, but I could live without it. I can lift even my biggest pots by the helper handle, and I'm a wimp. It would be so easy to empty such a pot.

                                                Woks can be found like that, but I've never seen anything else with that setup.

                                                1. re: DuffyH

                                                  Resto 10.6-qt. Stock Pot with Lid
                                                  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000...

                                                  http://www.demeyere.be/productfotos/R...
                                                  This large pot with special handle and perfect pouring edge is ideal for fruit or seafood preparations. A practical pot/pan to make jam or prepare a number of lobsters. This maslin pan is delivered with a stainless steel lid and is suitable for all cookers, including induction.

                                                  I have had my eye on this pan for a long time. If it wasn't so large, I would have purchased one long ago.

                                                  1. re: Sid Post

                                                    That is a beautiful pan, Sid. I'm infatuated right now, but know it's just a fling. I haven't used my 12-qt stockpot in over 2 years. that's one item I will not be replacing.

                                                    1. re: DuffyH

                                                      Infatuation is a good term.

                                                      Hmmmm ..... maybe I need to start making beer or going to California for fruit to make preserves.

                                              2. re: DuffyH

                                                I don't think they do. The helper handle is used to pick up and move a full pot (or pan), as you note. When I transfer the contents of my large saucepan (with helper handle), I use a ladle. It isn't designed for pouring.

                                                Even so, I could pour the contents using the two handles. It is only necessary to "corral the contents" at the end of the pour, when the pot can be held easily with one hand. It's only a problem if you are trying to pour the contents of a large pot into a smaller vessel, such as a canning jar. Don't do that. That's why we have funnels and ladles.

                                          3. re: Sid Post

                                            I really look like a cross between a deep skillet and a wok. I had a few cookware just like that. They are very useful for tossing.

                                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                              < I had a few cookware just like that.>

                                              But no longer?

                                              1. re: DuffyH

                                                Yeah, no longer.

                                                I had a couple with this shape. They were nonstick Teflon cookware. In time, the nonstick more or less worn off. So I decided to get real carbon steel woks from then all.

                                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                  CK - <They are very useful for tossing.> <So I decided to get real carbon steel woks from then all.>

                                                  Am I correct in thinking you're using your woks for all manner of tossed items? Like veg sides and such? Anything else you use them for that might be out of the ordinary?

                                                  1. re: DuffyH

                                                    I rarely toss in my cast iron skillet, just too heavy and really not safe for the cast iron skillet anyway (cast iron is more brittle).

                                                    I do toss in my carbon steel pan, but I have to do so very carefully and slowly. The woks are just easier to toss foods with. I am sure you have seen this clip since I have posted it many times:

                                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn2PJ9...

                                                    <Anything else you use them for that might be out of the ordinary?>

                                                    I won't say out of the ordinary, but I also use my woks to deep fry and had use it to steam foods. Because of the round bottom of a wok, I can deep fry a small amount of food using relatively less oil. Deep fry:

                                                    http://1tess.files.wordpress.com/2008...

                                                    I had used the wok for steaming too, but I stopped doing it because I feel the process has a tendency to weaken my seasoned surface. Again, because of the curved surface of a wok, it can more or less handle steamers of different size.

                                                    http://www.catalogs.com/info/bestof/w...

                                                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                      CK - Thanks for linking that video. I have indeed seen it and it was good to watch it again, just to see what I can eventually learn to do with a wok.

                                                      <Because of the round bottom of a wok, I can deep fry a small amount of food using relatively less oil.>

                                                      I can see some value in springing for a flat-bottom wok. One of the main reasons I don't deep fry more is because of the amount of oil wasted. So that's a pan with three functions, stir fry, tossing our frequent veg sides, and deep frying.

                                                      With a wok that isn't too big (heavy) for me, I could eliminate a smaller CS frypan, which would be largely used for tossing veggies. The cost would be similar, but it would do more.

                                                      Another very valuable post, that helps drive the decision process. Thank you. :)

                                      2. I bought the 10" pan, and am dithering over whether or not to pull the trigger on the 13" Chef Pan.

                                        3 Replies
                                        1. re: monavano

                                          monavano - any decision yet on the 13" chefs pan? Enquiring minds want to know. ;)

                                          1. re: DuffyH

                                            I'm deciding against it because I have an All Clad Copper Saucier that is a bit smaller, but essentially the same pan. Plus, I have too many pans and have to thin the herd!

                                            1. re: monavano

                                              <...I have too many pans and have to thin the herd!>

                                              A common problem for so many of us. Reminds me of the kid's fixation with his 'woobie' in Mister Mom. Dad (Michael Keaton) tells him it starts out with a woobie, next thing you're trying to score an electric blanket. That's how I ended up with my big 14" deep frypan. It was an incredible deal, and I just had to have it. It's barely used, and definitely not going to make the cut.

                                        2. Sid and Rigmaster -

                                          Do you have any clue about the volume of your chef pans?

                                          Last night I pulled my 3-qt chef's pan OUT of the cabinet and placed it firmly on my cooktop. Used it to make gravy for our roast turkey breast. I have to say, whisking was much easier in it than in my saucepans.

                                          Tonight it gets used to boil pasta and prep the garlic butter sauce to go with it.

                                          3 Replies
                                          1. re: DuffyH

                                            From Williams and Sonoma:
                                            12" fry pan: 12" diam., 5 1/2" high; 5 lb.

                                            From De Buyer (metric):
                                            5614.32 32 8.7 4 2.5 2.26

                                            Volume? I don't have my tape measure handy but it's the 32cm model Country Pan and it's pretty large though, I have used it on an 8" electric coil with good results. I really recommend a 10" but, mine is broken in this rental unit .... grrr

                                            It terms of liquid volume, I'm guessing its 5 quarts plus. My 4 quart saucepan seems too small but, the 6 quart seems slightly too large. I might try a 4 quart pans worth of water sometime when it's not so late to see where it sits on the sides.

                                            In terms of whisking and stirring things, the rounded and sloped sides of the "chef's pan" really works well. The real question, is what size is TOO BIG for you?

                                            1. re: DuffyH

                                              Haven't tried to fill it to the rim, but I easily holds 5 quarts liquid even though I don't use it for that purpose. Just used it to fill a 5qt Dutch Oven and it had plenty left. Heavy with that much in it though.

                                              I like it better than my wok for stir-fry. Just takes longer to heat up. Once it gets going on a high burner, gotta keep the food moving though just like they do at the restaurants.

                                              1. re: Rigmaster

                                                <Haven't tried to fill it to the rim, but I easily holds 5 quarts liquid> <I like it better than my wok for stir-fry.>

                                                Thanks, Rigmaster. I can't say this enough; the anecdotal remarks describing how you and others use your cookware every day is so very helpful to me. :)

                                            2. The doorbel just rang, and there was my big box from SLT. Inside was my Tim Love 12" frypan.

                                              First impressions -

                                              This sucker is HEAVY. It weighs 5lb, 12oz.. Empty. Before seasoning. Must be the beeswax coating causing it to weigh so much.

                                              It's got a silicon button marked with a star in the handle hole instead of the usual Mineral B "B" button. There's nothing stamped on the inside of the pan. There is a pair of little stars and the words "Chef Tim Love" stamped on the bottom outside. The entire logo is about 1" in size. The usual DeBuyer, France imprint is on the handle.

                                              In appearance, it is otherwise identical to the Mineral B. Semi-shiny light steel color, not at all like Carbone or Force Blue. It has a beeswax coating, and a clear coating on the handle.

                                              Did I mention it was heavy? This is one pan that would definitely benefit from a helper handle.

                                              Now I've got to find my flamethrower so I can get the beeswax off and start seasoning. :)

                                              6 Replies
                                              1. re: DuffyH

                                                My SLT box showed up today too! Man, I'm glad I didn't order the 12" and got the 10". The sucker is heavy! I'm looking forward to getting the beeswax off and seasoning too. I'm especially looking forward to when it's seasoned enough that an omelette will just slide right out...
                                                To get my order up to $50 for free shipping, I also got 2 tiny jar spatulas (bright yellow, so cute!) and a pair of fire engine red onion goggles.

                                                1. re: monavano

                                                  You'll be a kitchen rock star in those red goggles. :)

                                                  Upon further review, I've decided to return the frypan to SLT. The lack of a helper handle is making it a deal killer for me. I decided to run a test and see how easy it is to transport the pan from the range to the sink. It's only about 6', not far at all. Still, I had to use 2 hands and a lot of muscle. My 12" Lodge CI, which weighs 2lbs more, has a helper handle. It was a marked contrast, making the move with ease.

                                                  This got me thinking about pan balance, in a more general way. My 10.25" Carbone crepe pan feels heavier in the hand than my 12" stainless frypan, despite weighing about 6oz less. Neither has a helper handle. My best guess for why this is would be that the CS skillets have less weight in the handle than heavy stainless pans do, making them unbalanced.

                                                  When I checked my other pans, I found the same thing. It was less about the sheer weight of the pan, and more about how that weight is distributed.

                                                  With more weight (a heavier handle) closer to the hand holding the pan, the pan feels lighter. I knew that stinking YEAR of physics I had to take in college would pay off someday! :)

                                                  1. re: DuffyH

                                                    DuffyH,

                                                    What part of the country do you live in (assuming CONUS)? You never know, there might be a demo in your future!!!!

                                                    Best Regards,
                                                    Sid

                                                    1. re: Sid Post

                                                      Sid,

                                                      I'm in Florida, just north of Tampa. Your hair doesn't get frizzy, I hope? :)

                                                      1. re: DuffyH

                                                        Darn, I'm out West. You might look for a Williams and Sonoma demo day at a shopping mall.

                                                        1. re: Sid Post

                                                          We have a WS just 10 minutes away. I'll watch their email. Thanks for thinking of me. :)

                                              2. GH1618, Sid, Rigmaster, Chem -

                                                One or more of you have several times suggested that the best way to treat newly-seasoned cast iron is to fry things in it, like French fries and chicken. I'm here now (and a little bit OT) to say THANK YOU!!

                                                Here's the story. Dude had a Lodge Logic skillet that was in the garage with his camping stuff, but hadn't been used. I "rescued" (stole) it and stripped it clean in my oven on the cleaning cycle. Then I got the Dude to sand it down so it wasn't so sharp-bumpy, but more smooth-bumpy. We coated it with Crisco and seasoned it, twice, on the gas grill. It came out black, with no drips or gummed areas. Success!

                                                Then I decided to cook in it. What I cooked, I can't recall, but think it might have been bacon. Well, it stuck quite a bit. So I cleaned it, sighed and put it away. This was several months ago.

                                                This week I recalled your advice and decided to give it a go. I filled the pan about half-way with peanut oil and made french fries. The next night, using the same oil (left in the pan overnight) I fried some chicken tenders. Then I washed the pan, dried it, saw it was still shiny but had no oil residue, took a chance and put it away.

                                                This morning I fried some hash browns (yes, I DO love perfect hash browns) and was thrilled that there was zero sticking. I used a freshly-nuked, grated potato, still warm. It was perfect!
                                                Drunk with success, I threw caution to the winds and did the thing that no one EVER does with new-ish CI, I fried an egg with the remaining oil in the pan. It floated like it was a hockey puck on Zamboni-fresh ice!

                                                As soon as I finished breakfast and stopped dancing my happy dance, I knew it was time to post a big old Thank You note.

                                                So I say again, kudos and Thank You!

                                                3 Replies
                                                1. re: DuffyH

                                                  <insert big high-fiv'in grinning smiley here>

                                                  YOU'RE WELCOME!

                                                  It was a long winding road to get to this point but, we all benefit from a journey like this. I hope you and your new found pan have many decades of joyous cooking together.

                                                  1. re: Sid Post

                                                    <I hope you and your new found pan have many decades of joyous cooking together.>

                                                    We will, Sid, right up to the point that I screw up and do something stupid, like putting frozen stuff in it. :0

                                                  2. re: DuffyH

                                                    Long story short, properly seasoned cast iron and carbon steel cookware can act almost as nonstick as Teflon nonstick cookware. We weren't exaggerating.