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What kind of cut for chicken thigh meat will cook quickly for stir fry or grilling?

r
roz May 27, 2013 11:58 AM

Friends:

I shop frequently at a Japanese market that sells beef and pork cut in several ways that allow you to cook it quickly in stir fries, like yaki soba, or really fast grilling, like bulgogi, The cuts can be labeled "komagire" or "kiriotoshi" - I've even used meat pre-cut for sukiyaki, and although you're not supposed to stir-fry it, it comes out quite well.

Is there any way to get chicken thigh cut in a similar manner, or how would you cut it yourself? I don't mind a just a bit of skin and fat in it.

The Japanese market has a chicken curry cut, and I've seen fajita cuts in other grocery stores, but they don't look like they'd cook as quickly - and the curry cut looks like it's breast meat, which I've never had success in getting to be moist unless I marinade it.

Basically, I'm looking for a way to cut the thigh so that I come home, heat my pan up, throw in the meat with some worcestershire sauce or something similar, a few veggies, and maybe some yaki soba noodles that I've already microwaved, and have a super-quick meal.

TIA for any suggestions - there may be something simple here I'm overlooking.

-Roz

  1. JoanN May 27, 2013 12:20 PM

    I haven't noticed ready-to-stir-fry cut-up chicken in the Asian markets I frequent. I buy the eight one-pound packs of skinless, boneless chicken thighs at Costco and always have them on hand in the freezer for quick Asian stir-frys. (I tend to use thighs even when breast meat is called for since I prefer the flavor.) I just cut each thigh into bite-sized cubes.

    1. JungMann May 28, 2013 09:09 AM

      You are not going to get anything as thin as the beef scraps unless you pound out your chicken, which seems unnecessary. If you are buying boneless, skinless thighs, you need only thinly slice them against the grain into bite size pieces and you're ready to stir fry. Using a velveting technique will add additional flavor and tenderize the meat further.

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