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NY Daily News - Butter Banned in NYC Schools

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ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 08:06 AM

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/e...

Cause everybody knows margarine is so much healthier! Just like artificial sweeteners.

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  1. w
    wincountrygirl RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 08:10 AM

    This is really getting ridiculous!

    1. c
      chileheadmike RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 08:46 AM

      I'm just curious, how many schools were using butter? I'm guessing not many as margarine is cheaper.

      1. j
        jarona RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 08:55 AM

        The parents need to take responsibilty for their children's eathing habits. Butter is healthier than margarine or anything artificial and ...oh..I'm just getting sick of all this policing of food from everyone. Everyone needs to be accountable for what they injest. That's it.

        1 Reply
        1. re: jarona
          Jacquilynne RE: jarona May 10, 2013 10:29 AM

          This is for the ingredients used in food the school provides in its cafeterias, not banning parents from sending their kids to school with foods containing butter.

          Which is still weird, I have to admit, but not as overreaching.

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          GH1618 RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 09:04 AM

          What I find odd is that school cafeterias can buy directly. It would be more efficient to have centralized buying for the entire district, I think. Butter might be rationed for economic reasons as well as for health reasons. And they may want more vegetarian options to accomodate students preferences.

          As for health, the peanut butter is the problem (if it contains sugar), not the butter.

          Eliminating sodas from schools was certainly the right thing to do, in my opinion.

          4 Replies
          1. re: GH1618
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            fisher RE: GH1618 May 10, 2013 10:03 AM

            I'm curious. Why is peanut butter a problem?

            1. re: fisher
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              GH1618 RE: fisher May 10, 2013 10:08 AM

              Because most peanut butter contains a lot of added sugar.

              1. re: fisher
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                catroast RE: fisher May 10, 2013 10:40 AM

                some children die in its presence?

                1. re: catroast
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                  GH1618 RE: catroast May 10, 2013 10:43 AM

                  Specific allergies are a separate problem from nutrition.

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              GH1618 RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 10:41 AM

              Here are the New York City Department of Education Nutritional Standards:

              http://www.opt-osfns.org/schoolfood/p...

              I don't see anything wrong with having and enforcing standards. The only problem I have with this is its emphasis on fat instead of sugar.

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                Tom34 RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 11:04 AM

                I don't think the problem is at school. Lunch periods are relatively short and the school lunch portions are relatively small. In school, most of us ate either a burger and fries or pizza every day and 90% of us were pretty skinny.

                What needs to be looked at is kids getting home from school, dropping themselves in front of the boob tube and devouring a 1 LB bag of Doritos or other similar type of junk food.

                1 Reply
                1. re: Tom34
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                  GH1618 RE: Tom34 May 10, 2013 11:08 AM

                  Sure, but the topic of this thread is not what is needed to solve the general problem, but what the policy of a school district should be concerning the food it serves.

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                  mpjmph RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 11:57 AM

                  I don't see how PB&J or cream cheese are better than butter when it comes to topping bread. I also don't get "low fat salad oil." If it's oil, it's oil, and it can't be low fat.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: mpjmph
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                    GH1618 RE: mpjmph May 10, 2013 12:17 PM

                    They should have written "low saturated fat."

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                    John Francis RE: ratgirlagogo May 10, 2013 12:33 PM

                    The Daily News, New York's leading tabloid, loves to make a big deal out of this kind of thing. It's in huge block letters on their front page - the biggest news story of the day, according to them.

                    The story says the rule against butter in school lunches dates back to 2008. Five years later, some kitchen managers have been flaunting the rule and are now being called to account. I suppose one or more of them ran crying to the Daily News.

                    The public school system is responsible for providing kids with healthy and nutritious meals. Butter is not a necessity of life, and our diet is arguably healthier without it. What's the big deal?

                    4 Replies
                    1. re: John Francis
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                      jeanmarieok RE: John Francis May 10, 2013 02:02 PM

                      I think the 'big deal' is that they are probably substituting something worse than butter, like margarine, or corn oil, etc. It's one of those bans that makes no sense.

                      1. re: jeanmarieok
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                        GH1618 RE: jeanmarieok May 10, 2013 02:33 PM

                        I prefer butter, but there's nothing in margarine that makes it worse, at least in the brand I looked up.

                        1. re: GH1618
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                          Tom34 RE: GH1618 May 10, 2013 02:44 PM

                          The only thing I use margarine for is buffalo wing sauce.

                      2. re: John Francis
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                        Tom34 RE: John Francis May 10, 2013 02:22 PM

                        In the 1970's Federally subsidized lunch programs mandated a balanced nutritious meal. Every tray got milk, peas, corn, oranges & apples whether the kids wanted it or not. The people who benefited most on the front end were farmers & purveyors. The people who benefited the most on the back end were the teachers who stood next to the trash can and hoarded apples, oranges & milk & the sanitation companies who charged by the ton to haul the rest of the crap to a landfill.

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