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Top 10 Chinese In L.A. List To End Them All

Meaning nobody will ever take these lists seriously again.

http://www.refinery29.com/44240/slide...

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  1. One has to ask...how many of these dishes/places have you tried and how did you like the dishes (or abhor them)?

    2 Replies
    1. re: Servorg

      I've been to all of the restaurants, but haven't had any of the dishes. Except for Yang Chow, the dishes chosen weren't exactly signature dishes for the particularly venue.

      1. re: Chandavkl

        So you like the slippery shrimp at Yang Chow, then?

    2. I don't think I've taken these lists seriously in a long while.

      2 Replies
      1. re: blimpbinge

        You mean you once did?

        1. re: Chandavkl

          :x

      2. Looks like a Zagat list to me. Maybe you need to come up with a list.

        1. why isn't Panda Express and PF Chang on the list?!

          2 Replies
          1. re: dreamcast18

            I just got back from a three week business trip to China and shockingly enough, Panda Express is actually pretty authentic.

            1. re: jgilbert1000

              Yes, I love Panda Express beijing kao ya, niu rou juen bing, and xiaolongbao

              Mr Taster

          2. I am certainly not going to even jot it down on my " to do " list.
            Sorry, not a chance.

            1. Can I get a list of the "Top 10 Lists of Top 10 Chinese Restaurants in LA Lists"?

              1. These lists are fun for all. They really got their panties all bunched when challenged about the Mexican list. Read the comments, one of the authors tries to respond with a pathetic rant, saying they are a "Global Lifestyle Hub"!

                http://www.lamag.com/lafood/digestblo...

                1. i stopped reading once i saw the words "mabo tofu"

                  13 Replies
                  1. re: ClarissaW

                    I did that too

                    I stopped ordering mapo tofu at restaurants after making it at home with Fuschia Dunlop's recipe from "Land of Plenty". Made with the Chinese leek (western leek/green onions are totally inferior substitutes for the garlicky punch of the Chinese leek), Pixian doubanjiang (in the red pouch) and Pearl River Bridge fermented black beans... good lord, that stuff is spectacular, and truly easy to make. (The dish comes together in about 10 minutes). It's spoiled me for all restaurant versions.

                    And don't get me started on the boxed version.... :)

                    Mr Taster

                    1. re: Mr Taster

                      While mapo tofu (and dan dan mian) are simple to make at home, sometimes I prefer to let the masters do it. Based on a recommendation, I once ordered Mapo Tofu at Shu Feng - the San Gabriel location - and I wasn't disappointed.

                      1. re: JThur01

                        The homemade version is so spectacular, I can't imagine a better version, but I'll give it a shot.

                        Mr Taster

                        1. re: Mr Taster

                          Here's how it happened. I was sick, wanted something spicy, yet light. Meat sounded greasy and heavy, so I followed a CH recommendation and...it was good. Would I be likely to order it again? No, simply because there are so many other options on the menu + the ease of making it at home. For a group of diners, it would definitely be a worthwhile addition.

                          YMMV. I have no way of comparing it to your homemade version. I see where you come from. I'm good with salmon. To the point where people who've eaten salmon I've prepared tell me they'd rather have mine than order it. Same applies to me. I'll usually only order salmon as a last resort.

                          1. re: Mr Taster

                            no link to recipe = no care

                            1. re: ns1

                              Buy the book. It's worth its weight in gold leafed prickly ash.

                              Mr Taster

                              1. re: ns1

                                Just for you (and anyone else who is interested).

                                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/900924

                                1. re: Servorg

                                  That's the "every grain of rice" version. The "land of plenty" version is not vegetarian and is the one I make. Soft or silken tofu (different brands have different consistencies). That version is delicous, though.

                                  Mr Taster

                                  1. re: Mr Taster

                                    Okay. Added what looks to be the recipe from Land of Plenty to that post...

                                    1. re: Servorg

                                      How strange. That recipe is mostly Fuschia recipe (which she adapted directly from what she learned at a top Sichuanese cooking school) but the author has taken some strange liberties. You absolutely do not trim the greens from Chinese leeks and it's made with ground beef, not pork. Also, if you don't have the book, you're not going to know necessarily that you toast the Sichuan peppercorns before grinding them. Really, if you have even a passing interest in Chinese food, this book is a requirement. (and I am a proud library card carrier and user - I don't buy books unless they have significant lasting v value)

                                      Mr Taster

                              2. re: Mr Taster

                                The homemade version is so spectacular, I can't imagine a better version,
                                _____________________

                                This is how I feel about dumplings (or Jiǎozi or 餃子)

                          2. re: ClarissaW

                            Really? Because orange chicken came waaaay before "mabo tofu". ;-)

                            1. re: ClarissaW

                              I didn't see "mabo tofu" but I did see "mobo tofu" which stopped me cold.

                            2. my first thought was: why go to kam hong for that when beijing pie house is essentially next door? but since she mentioned the noodles at kam hong i kept going. when i saw the orange chicken i looked at the rest for a completely different reason.

                              i'm guessing she mentioned the bun at DTF because the DTF listing at wikipedia incorrectly describes XLB as buns instead of dumplings.

                              7 Replies
                              1. re: barryc

                                Ipse, would you care to take this or should I?

                                Mr Taster

                                1. re: Mr Taster

                                  I obviously defer to you (and your lovely Tasting Assistant).

                                2. re: barryc

                                  Xiao long BAO? :)

                                  1. re: barryc

                                    Oy vey. Would a Chinese speaker care to ring in?

                                    :-O

                                    1. re: J.L.

                                      i know that bao is chinese (i AM chinese), but semantically due to the relatively thin skin & filling i choose to categorize them more as dumplngs than as buns.)

                                      1. re: barryc

                                        It's all good.

                                        It's just that most Chinese I know and those I grew up with immediately think jiaozi when the English word "dumpling" is used, and likewise bao or mantou when "bun" is used.

                                        1. re: J.L.

                                          My wife is from Taiwan and that's exactly it. The Chinese definition is based on the shape of the wrapper (notice how xiaolongbao and shengjianbao are both the same shape, both "buns", even though one is wrapped in bread and the other in noodle). The western definition obviously confuses a lot of people, since our experience with "buns" is the bread hamburger bun type exclusively.

                                          Mr Taster