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What's for Dinner #213 - The Snoop Dogg Edition [old]

I'm not into rap music, but as unhip as I am, I *had* heard about the group 213, and that was about as punny as I could get without a second cuppa cawfee this fine Sunday morning! :-)

So what's cooking on your stove, in your oven, on your grill today?

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  1. As for me, it'll be BISO chicken breasts. I *might* make Gordon Hamersley's version with lemon, garlic, shallots, and parsley and lemony roasted potatoes; I might do something else with orange juice and Israeli couscous as the starch. Still not sure.

    3 Replies
    1. re: LindaWhit

      love israeli couscous. One of my favorite sides and lends itself to so many flavor combos.

      1. re: LindaWhit

        Personally I would go with the Gordon Hamersley's version after reading your description of it...I love the flavor of lemon especially with chicken and potatoes. It is one of the reasons why I often crave Greek Style Chicken and Potatoes. Mmm.

        1. re: littleflower

          LOL! See my post below, littleflower. ;-)

      2. I am still in bed as my son and husband surprised me with breakfast. Spinach omelet, fresh raspberries, coffee and some beautiful flowers.

        Going out to dinner tonight for my birthday. One of my favorite local places. I am looking forward to a couple of good cocktails and wine from our bin. Oh and the food too!

        http://www.toscahingham.com

        12 Replies
        1. re: foodieX2

          Oh MY! That menu looks amazing! Have a wonderful birthday dinner!

          1. re: foodieX2

            Wow, lucky you, foodieX2!! Enjoy what sounds like will be a wonderful day.

            1. re: foodieX2

              Enjoy your day, and it's a beautiful one here in the NE!

              1. re: foodieX2

                Love that place! Have a wonderful day and a fabulous meal!

                1. re: foodieX2

                  thanks everyone!! So far the day has been amazing and the weather is perfect. FINALLY!

                  1. re: foodieX2

                    What a special way to start off your birthday - that was sweet of them to surprise you with a delicious breakfast and flowers! Enjoy your birthday dinner out tonight!

                    1. re: foodieX2

                      Happy, Happy Birthday, foodieX2. Sounds wonderful. My DH's birthday is also today as well as my neighbor across the street. Great crowd.

                      1. re: foodieX2

                        If it's not too late, can you please bring me back a piece of that yummy sounding Coconut cake?!!

                        Best wishes for a fabulous birthday fX2...sounds as though you're off to a perfect start! Many happy returns!

                          1. re: foodieX2

                            Thanks again everyone! Dinner was amazing, as usual. Started with a great pink grapefruit cocktail then switched to some really good wine. Started with the steak tartare and the had the wonderful spring onion and asparagus risotto. I nibbled on my husbands chicken livers and son's veal meatball pizza-so good!!

                            Not being a dessert person I skipped it but then they surprised me this! We all shared and it was quite good. Fun was had by all!!

                             
                            1. re: foodieX2

                              Love the scrolly-written Happy Birthday on the edge of the plate!

                              1. re: foodieX2

                                Sounds amazing, thanks for the report!

                            2. A couple of rump steaks are defrosting as we speak. There's most of a bag of mixed salad leaves still left from last night. And a bag of watercress. And there's still about half the garlic loaf we bought on the way home from Edinburgh - lovely soft white bread inside a crisp crust, studded with whole roasted cloves of garlic - just fab.

                              3 Replies
                              1. re: Harters

                                Sounds good Harters..... did you post about your meals in Edinburgh yet? I really like reading your resto reviews:) Always a good tone to them, whether the meal was yeah or meh.

                                1. re: gingershelley

                                  Yep, check out the UK/Ireland board for this weeks eats "north of the border" (and a lunch on the way back)

                                  1. re: Harters

                                    Well now I am hungry, Harters from reading of your foo-ventures up North!

                                    Seems you dined quite well with the Mrs. on your trip. Especially liked your meal at Kitchin, and that lamb for two at Martin Wishart. Sigh.... hope to get back to Edinburgh one day, and will keep those places on the list for there.

                                    Must go see about some brunch'ish food now that you have me all peckish.

                              2. It's rainy and gloomy, so dinner will be either spaghetti with my favorite meatballs, or lasagna with Italian sausage and a parmesan bechamel instead of ricotta.
                                And we have some different lettuces in the garden that have been there all winter, so they're kind of bitter. I wonder if they would be good candidates for cooking like greens, instead of eating in salad? There's a little spinach, lots of a mesclun mix, and some kale. We've done the kale and spinach together with bacon and onions, but haven't tried cooking the lettuce.

                                3 Replies
                                1. re: kitchengardengal

                                  kitchengardengal, how do you make your favorite recipe for meatballs? I have one that I have been using forever but like to get ideas on how others make theirs.

                                  1. re: littleflower

                                    To regular ground chuck, I add finely minced garlic and onion, oregano, basil and marjoram, a handful of well-crushed saltines, and an egg, and some freshly ground pepper. Mix it all up, brown in a skillet, and finish cooking in the sauce.

                                    It's not anything special, I know, but I learned this recipe in Home Ec class back in the late 60's, and it's been my go-to meatball for spaghetti ever since. I've done breadcrumbs and milk, dry crumbs, oatmeal...still like this the best.

                                    1. re: kitchengardengal

                                      Interesting...seems that the secret then to your meatballs is the well-crushed saltines...will have to give this a try as a substitute to breadcrumbs/milk.

                                2. Lamb neck fillet braised in red wine, and beef stock-starting with a sofrito and adding roseamary and bay leaf. Planning on straining the sauce at the end and reducing.
                                  Soft polenta and savoy cabbage to accompany the lamb.

                                  10 Replies
                                  1. re: Paprikaboy

                                    Lamb neck, that's a new one for me. It sounds great probably similar to shanks. Where do you buy it?

                                    1. re: fldhkybnva

                                      It needs to be cooked slowly like shank.
                                      I'm starting at 180c for 20 mins then 130 for 2 hrs.
                                      I'm in the UK and got it from a supermarket not sure about supermarkets in the US but assume any half decent butcher will stock it.

                                      1. re: Paprikaboy

                                        Ahh, the UK - land of widely available and tasty lamb, lucky you!

                                        1. re: Paprikaboy

                                          As PB notes, lamb neck fillet is *the* thing for a braise or, indeed, a lamb stew. Readily available in the UK from any supermarket. Well worth searching out if you're not "over here".

                                          1. re: Harters

                                            And even at a great specialty butcher - I NEVER see lamb neck here in the USA - at least my part (SEA).

                                            I have challenged my butcher-slash-charcuterie guys Rain Shadow Meats (they make there own patés and mortadella, among other offerings and all their meats are farm-sourced, pasture/humanely raised, etc.) to get me some lamb neck - and for a reasonable price... that throwdown was just last week while discussing the samples they will give for The Butler Did It! Food Tours, so we shall see what occurs.

                                            Iether I irritated them asking for too much sampling while on the tour, or it was all cool, and I can pick up a lamb neck later this week:)! I would love to make a spring stew with tiny peas and asparagus in it....

                                      2. re: Paprikaboy

                                        The idea of the lamb infused sauce poured over soft polenta is making me drool. I sound like a broken record, I know, but I truely do love lamb and don't get the opportunity nearly enough to enjoy it lately. I have heard of lamb's neck but never have tried it...heard it was supposed to be (when cooked low and slow) and outstanding cut of the lamb that is not often eaten here in the States.

                                        1. re: littleflower

                                          In the UK, we would differentiate between "lamb neck" and "lamb neck fillet". The former is very fatty, usually on the bone, and would need very long cooking (and I don't like it). The latter is a much leaner (although not lean) fillet cut that can easily be roasted as well as braised - and just about works for quick cooked kebabs.

                                          1. re: Harters

                                            Thanks Harters - I am glad that you informed me of the distinction between the two! I don't think I would like lamb neck too much, then. :-) I will be sure to ask for the lamb neck fillet vs. just the lamb's neck if I get a chance to get that cut.

                                            1. re: Harters

                                              I would give for either of those options at any butcher shop in the USA, seriously. Options on second cuts, butchers, please!

                                              Where does all that goodness go?

                                              1. re: gingershelley

                                                That's a good question, Shelley. There's good lamb raised in America. I know - I've eaten it. Something must happen to the less attractive bits of the animal. Surely they are not literally discarded.