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。best ramen in south bay area

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Banbibu was opened the door about a week ago. Long waited chef Hiro's ramen joint in south bay area. it took almost 1 year to open. I guess he was experimenting a lot. As a big ramen fun myself, I have to try it. I was impressed. It's very small and simple look but plenty of parking since it is right next to Albertson's super market in Hollywood riviera. We tried 1. Tonkotsu shio ramen w/spinach and extra cha-shyu. 2. Spicy miso ramen. 3. Vegetable gyouza. 1----Excellent. The best one I ever had include his last place. 2---Little sweet side but enough spice and nice taste. 3---Tipical Japanese style pot sticker. Lite but good texture and perfectly done.
Price was very inexpensive. Service was good and fast. It just make me worry tthis place may get too busy soon. I hate waiting in the line but that's my problem. It worth driving 30 min from my house. If you are in the area and love ramen, must try. BT

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    89 Replies
    1. re: bigtuna27

      Too bad the egg is cooked all the way through...

      1. re: Porthos

        I saw the egg in the photo and immediately thought you'd be pointing that out. I hope those in the kitchen heed your remarks.

        1. re: bulavinaka

          The ramen scene in LA is very competitive these days.

          If the chefs at Playground can teach themselves to make a wonderful soft boiled egg, there's no reason a ramen specialist can't.

          I've stopped going to Yamadaya OC since they got lazy and now only serve a hard boiled egg.

          Back to the Southbay for ramen and hoping Tsujita comes down to the OC.

          1. re: Porthos

            At the ramen restaurants I've been frequenting, the "default" egg that comes with the bowl is usually hard-boiled. My hypothesis is that at some point, if the soft-boiled eggs aren't consumed in short order, they may be "converted" to hard-boiled, so perhaps it's one way the restaurant can run through the surplus of hard-boiled eggs. Just a theory with no supporting information.

            Most of the ramen places I've eaten at will substitute the default hard-boiled with a hanjuku egg without additional cost.

            Also, we don't know if bigtuna27 likes a hanjuku egg or if s/he likes hard boiled, so this may be how s/he wanted it.

            1. re: PeterCC

              As far as I know, the hanjuku/aji tamago are made during their prep earlier in the day (well, for some shops) then they are put in the fridge and taken out before opening shop. That's why you occasionally run into a cold egg/yolk. It would seem like a logistics nightmare otherwise hah

              1. re: PeterCC

                Hi. I don't know why people are insisting on soft boiled egg. It's only begun when new ramen trend started. Before that we had raw egg or poached egg. Half boiled egg taste good for sure but it is not the must have thing for ramen. So judging ramen by soft boiled egg only is not fair. I think it's more important thing about ramen. 1 Soup.2. noodle
                3. Chashu. Egg comes in last. Just my opinion.

                1. re: bigtuna27

                  Agree with you 100%. Soup, men, gu. That order.

              2. re: Porthos

                maybe this ramen restaurant doesn't like soft boiled eggs?

                i think it's a bit overbearing to criticize a restaurant for something they don't have.

                1. re: kainzero

                  Sorry. Missed the new posting guidelines.

                  When is it okay to criticize a restaurant and when is it not okay to criticize a restaurant?

                  Really confused how one deems certain criticism overbearing and others spot on.

                2. re: Porthos

                  Medium boiled flavored eggs (hanjuku/ajitsuke tamago) are very common in japan, almost every shop I went to (that served ramen with eggs) had some form of it. I think out of all the shops i went, i could count the ones that had hard boiled eggs on one hand.

                  To me, the lack of this is just laziness. For example, the santouka in torrance always gives me a hard boiled egg, which is disappointing.. because their locations in japan give me a nice medium boiled one. It's a pretty simple thing that should be taken more seriously by ramen shops in LA imo.

                  Medium vs Soft boiled egg: Slight misconception, because soft boiled eggs have both runny yolks and the part of the white near the yolk, while medium boiled have a fully cooked white and partially cooked yolk.

                  1. re: blimpbinge

                    You're right, I meant medium boiled with cooked white and soft/custard yolk center not the 65 degree egg.

                    I agree with a hard boiled egg being a sign of laziness rather than the ramen shop "not liking" a hanjuku/ajitsuke tamago (unless there is a particular style of ramen that requires a hard boiled egg that I'm not aware of). A valid criticism for the "best ramen in south bay area".

                    1. re: blimpbinge

                      "It's a pretty simple thing that should be taken more seriously by ramen shops in LA imo."

                      many do, the ones in the op, santouka, and yamdaya don't.

                      1. re: ns1

                        Yamadaya used to. Then they got lazy.

                        Is it confirmed that the other branches are now also hard boiled?

                        1. re: Porthos

                          i've been to CM once and torrance once and got hard boiled both times....

                          1. re: ns1

                            Recently or 2-3 years ago?

                            It was a moderately runny at the Torrance original around the time Ramieniac first reviewed it and stayed that way for at least a year.

                            1. re: Porthos

                              torrance = 2-3 years ago, cm = recently

                        2. re: ns1

                          and there are also a large number that don't

                    2. re: bulavinaka

                      hard or soft yolks should be up to the customer's preference. props to ramen restaurants who are willing to do both.

                      1. re: andrew_eats

                        Now that's a comment I can agree with. I was just talking to a customer at my wife's business the other day and we got on to the topic of ramen. They commented about trying one of the higher rated places here on the LA board and they said they really liked it, except for the medium soft boiled egg. They said they hated that and it was a huge turnoff and they probably wouldn't go back based on that one thing as they only liked their egg hard boiled.

                        1. re: Servorg

                          Like I said in the other post, a flavored medium boiled egg is pretty standard in japan. Standard as in, that's the way it is at most shops. I'd rather have them stick with how it's supposed to be done than to bow down to customer demands and start changing their recipe left and right.

                          I see that customer saying stuff like "i love wonton noodles, but not the way chinese people make it, I won't go back unless they make it the way i want"

                          I mean what is that? Not going back to a shop because they're doing things the correctly?

                          Buuut having both methods alleviates this issue..

                          1. re: blimpbinge

                            I'll just note that "pretty standard" is something less than universal and, in any case, the soft boiled egg police aren't going to haul you off for preparing, or liking it, hard boiled...

                            1. re: Servorg

                              Hey sorry servorg, I realized my post came off kind of confrontational, that wasn't the intent :x

                              1. re: blimpbinge

                                Just trying to point out that there really can't be a "right" way when it comes to liking the taste of something. There can certainly be more prevalent ways of doing something, or even traditional/authentic (although I've come to dislike the word "authentic" to some degree in that it means one having a dish some other way is "inauthentic" which seems to be sliding towards the pejorative end of the word spectrum).

                                1. re: Servorg

                                  Just trying to point out that there really can't be a "right" way when it comes to liking the taste of something.
                                  ====================
                                  Let me start off by saying I am also not trying to be confrontational, and just providing "food for thought".

                                  I know this is the feel good answer but there must be a taste that appeals to most people or some standard for determining what is "good". If there wasn't, then why are some restaurants "better" than others (ignoring the PR/hype argument). How can a chef salt and season to the tastes of the majority of the population if there wasn't a commonly agreed on amount of salt that makes food taste not bland but not overly salted. Why do certain people gravitate towards certain cuisines or restaurants? People from different backgrounds, experiences, and upbringings no less. If taste truly was so individual, wouldn't it all be more random?

                                  Of course there are always outliers but if someone liked fistfulls of salt in their food, does that mean they should start requesting that a restaurant provide that for them? Or do we start saying kudos to the restaurant that offers both? If someone not familiar with a cuisine likes it a particular way, does that outlier carry the same weight as hundreds or thousands of years of tradition and the people who developed and enjoyed that cuisine?

                                  Just some chow philosophy to chew over :-)

                                  1. re: Porthos

                                    I wrote something on another thread about my wife and her salt sensitivity. We can be having the same dish, at the same time, and I'm adding salt to mine and my wife is saying "This is way too salty." So, there is just too much variation in taste to try and corral everyone under one cuisine or preparation. You can like what you like, and to me the reason is immaterial. Just cut the rest of us the same slack. And trying to come up with "subjective" facts to prove your taste is the right one? Totally without foundation IMO...

                                    1. re: Servorg

                                      Again, no one is trying to cut anyone off or corral anyone. You keep assuming the worse with my posts despite 2 disclaimers.

                                      How can so many people agree if there are so many variations in taste? It's as legitimate as the other position. For example, the boat noodles at Sapp are insanely salty to my tastes. So much so it burns. But I don't know enough about Thai cuisine or how traditional boat noodles are made to pronounce this over salted. Maybe this is the way it is supposed to be? I have seen many a Thai diner dump sugar into the soup. Maybe this is what balances the salt and maybe it is intentionally made this salty. Maybe that's why there are containers of sugar on the table. I don't have the gall or expertise to criticize Sapp for the way they do boat noodles. And after a few more consecutive visits, the body adjusts and it's all delicious. And if I haven't been in more than a year, the salt content still sends my body into shock the first visit back. Should I have asked them to make their boat noodles less salty or asked them to add water? Would that degrade the product as it was intended?

                                      Again, food for thought. No cutoffs or police tactics intended or implied. Just trying to have a reasonable conversation for once without any finger pointing.

                                      1. re: Porthos

                                        "How can so many people agree if there are so many variations in taste? It's as legitimate as the other position."

                                        By Jove, I think you got it! That is exactly the point I've been trying to make. Maybe I finally made it effectively? One does not make the other less "legitimate" because it's either more, or less popular, to my way of thinking. Being in the minority, as it were, is finally becoming somewhat "hot" in our society...thank goodness.

                                        1. re: Servorg

                                          I don't see Porthos advocating that people should only like hanjuku eggs, even though it's obvious that it's his preferred preparation method. I don't know if he's been to the restaurant that started this thread, but as far as I can tell, he hasn't even advocated that people should complain to the restaurant about the lack of hanjuku eggs (despite bulavinaka's somewhat confusing "I hope those in the kitchen heed your remarks." comment, which said comment at the time was simply that he (Porthos) was disappointed).

                                          I don't necessarily agree with him calling ramen places "lazy" for not serving hanjuku eggs, but otherwise I don't think he's trying to force his views on anyone.

                                          1. re: PeterCC

                                            Don't mind Don Servorg. He has a habit of misinterpreting my posts and intentions and then falsely accusing me with some imaginary demons.

                                            Things have pretty much gone downhill after this thread:

                                            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/766809

                                            1. re: Porthos

                                              And now, the argumentum ad hominem...and one wonders why I take issue with some of what you post.

                                              1. re: Porthos

                                                Well you and I've had our history too, haven't we? ;-)

                                                And I'm not really taking sides, I mean I do agree very much with Servorg on personal taste as well. No one can mandate that I like something just because it's prepared authentically, traditionally, or optimally. And I would prefer a restaurant be more accommodating rather than less.

                                                On the flipside, I do also seek out traditional experiences that are new to me, so I can increase my breadth of experience. I think most of us here on CH, yourself and Servorg too I'm sure, do. Doesn't mean I'll like or go back to a place just because they do it "right" if I didn't enjoy it. I appreciated the signature soup at Han Bat Sul Lung Tang, but I have no desire to have it again any time soon.

                                                1. re: PeterCC

                                                  No one can mandate that I like something just because it's prepared authentically, traditionally, or optimally
                                                  ==============================
                                                  I think that's the key point of misunderstanding.

                                                  No one is mandating you like something authentic or traditional. Of course you can dislike something authentic or traditional. I don't like authentic or traditional Ethiopian cuisine so I don't seek it out.

                                                  But to criticize it as not good or not done properly because of it's authenticity is not respecting the cuisine as the people of that country/region has developed it and enjoyed it.

                                                  1. re: Porthos

                                                    (To be clear, I wasn't saying that you're saying that I have to like something authentic or traditional; just trying to get at the crux of the argument.)

                                                    I'm not sure anyone is saying that something is "not done properly" either. In the example you and Servorg seem to be debating, his wife's customers said that they "hated [the hanjuku egg] and it was a huge turnoff and they probably wouldn't go back based on that one thing as they only liked their egg hard boiled" (in Servorg's words). While rather strong an opinion, they did not say it was wrong in any way, and it was clearly their personal taste.

                                                    (As far as if some criticizes a food as "not good" even when objectively prepared "properly", I just translate that to mean "not my personal preference".)

                                                    1. re: PeterCC

                                                      I'm not sure anyone is saying that something is "not done properly" either.
                                                      ========================
                                                      This has been intimated before on other threads regarding other cuisines. That the chef or restaurant was at fault and incompetent not that it didn't fit the taster's preference.

                                                      1. re: Porthos

                                                        Well that I disagree with, of course, but that's a lot of baggage to carry around the board. ;-)

                                                2. re: Porthos

                                                  "Things have pretty much gone downhill after this thread:"

                                                  One question about your comment regarding that thread. Can you point me to one thing I said that makes you say that what you wrote in that thread, or how I responded to what you wrote, made things go "downhill" afterward? I can find nothing that leads me to that conclusion in that thread. And I just reread it.

                                                  1. re: Servorg

                                                    Meaning it has not been any more cordial than that.

                                                    Perhaps I read too much into your response but you ended your response with "your review has done nothing to change it" after going on about how some people don't appreciate creativity in cuisine. I thought the response a bit odd considering I never said anything to dissuade a visit and listed the creative items that worked for me and the creative stuff that didn't. Like I've said before, stuff gets lost in written format sometimes.

                                          2. re: Servorg

                                            If someone put ketchup on a well-marbled, dry-aged Prime ribeye, would that be ok?

                                            What if you liked that same piece of steak not just well-done, but jerky-like, and then slathered it with ketchup. Still ok?

                                            1. re: ipsedixit

                                              Okay for who? Me? No. For someone else that liked it that way, absofuckinglutley...

                                              1. re: ipsedixit

                                                What does "ok" mean?

                                                We live in a free country, people are free to offend and free to be offended. People are free to patronize a restaurant and restaurants are free to eject people. But there's not really a food police, or more accurately, a taste police to enforce what is "ok".

                                                1. re: PeterCC

                                                  Go Pete! You flaming liberal... (g)

                                                  1. re: PeterCC

                                                    We live in a free country ...
                                                    ______________________________

                                                    Well, that's not really true. We live in a country where we are *generally* free from government intrusion.

                                                    We are not technically free from any and all manners of private restrictions.

                                                    Just ask Sang Yoon, I'm sure he'd be more than happy to tell you what's OK with respect to a burger.

                                                    1. re: ipsedixit

                                                      "Just ask Sang Yoon, I'm sure he'd be more than happy to tell you what's OK with respect to a burger."

                                                      One more illustration of that pesky freedom thing?

                                                      1. re: ipsedixit

                                                        "Well, that's not really true. We live in a country where we are *generally* free from government intrusion."

                                                        Yes, I realize that, but that statement doesn't make as big of an impact? ;-)

                                        2. re: blimpbinge

                                          I'd rather have them stick with how it's supposed to be done than to bow down to customer demands and start changing their recipe left and right.
                                          ==============
                                          I agree. The customer is not always right.

                                          1. re: Porthos

                                            If it's wrong to have it the way I enjoy it, then I don't want to be right...(I could write song lyrics!) ;-D>

                                          2. re: blimpbinge

                                            "Not going back to a shop because they're doing things the correctly?"

                                            That concept would be pretty funny, but I don't think most people really think like that. The flipside of that argument would be to insist that someone patronize (and like) a restaurant just because the food is authentic.

                                            It really is as simple as people liking what they like, but it doesn't mean restaurants have to cater to a particular taste. The customer is not always right, but no restaurant can be expected to appeal to everyone (and few restaurants have that expectation, I know).

                                            Restaurants do what they feel is right, and diners "vote" with their dollars. For every one of Servorg's wife's customers that may not go back to a ramen place because they only serve hanjuku eggs, there's a Porthos who won't go to a ramen place because they only serve hard-boiled eggs. ;-)

                                            I agree that having the choice (in this case, between hard-boiled and hanjuku eggs) is usually the best option. It opens up clientele without (I think) compromising authenticity too much (I imagine many Japanese customers do like hard-boiled eggs in their ramen too).

                                            1. re: blimpbinge

                                              Sorry, but that's quite a misconception that hanjuku tamago is standard in Japan. It's not. It's true that the more "gourmet" places feature hanjuku tamago, but many (and I would think the majority of ramen shops in Japan) don't. I like hanjuku tamago as much as the posters here, but to harp on a ramen place for not making it misses the point, and it's not about laziness either. To me, is sounds like someone making negative comments about a steakhouse because the salmon was overcooked.

                                              1. re: E Eto

                                                Thank you for chiming in on the prevalence of the hanjuku egg in Japan. Personally it helps brings things into perspective.

                                                Some people do give equal weight to soup, noodles, toppings (including the egg) though when "judging" a bowl of ramen with extra "points" given to a medium boiled egg (eg. Ramieniac).

                                                In my mind, the steakhouse analogy would be more like a steakhouse offering dry aged vs not. To some it is an integral part of the experience, to others, not necessary. Salmon at a steakhouse seems more akin to gyoza or fried rice at a ramen shop.

                                                1. re: E Eto

                                                  I go to Japan every year for vacation, and most of what I do is eat. Most of the Ramen places I go to (that serve their Ramen with an egg) give me a flavored medium boiled egg. So this is from my experience, not a "misconception".

                                                  1. re: blimpbinge

                                                    OK, maybe not a misconception, more like a mistaken assumption or extrapolation.

                                                    1. re: E Eto

                                                      Sampling bias?

                                                      1. re: PeterCC

                                                        That too.

                                                      2. re: E Eto

                                                        Or maybe I happen to hit most of the nicer ones?? I didn't account for that earlier, but I don't go to Japan to eat avg tasting Ramen heh

                                                      3. re: blimpbinge

                                                        I remember having to hit the add-tamago button everywhere, including Kikanbou. Where are these fancy-pants places you're going that include egg by default? I'm asking not to argue the point, but because my tummy wants to know :)

                                                      4. re: E Eto

                                                        E Eto is totally right. The hanjuku tamago is not standard in Japan -- it is usually only available at the very good high-end places.

                                                        1. re: Tripeler

                                                          "it is usually only available at the very good high-end places."

                                                          That's either the most ridiculous thing i've ever heard or japan's streets are littered with very good high end places because i happen to find them (hanjuku tamago) everywhere without needing to search.

                                                          1. re: blimpbinge

                                                            Dude, that's cuz you're always slumming it in Aoyama or Ginza.

                                                            Need to get out more and mix with the common folks ...

                                                            :-)

                                                            1. re: ipsedixit

                                                              Haha oh well. I don't live there, so when I go, maybe I tend to subconsciously skip over shops that I dont find appealing. Will be more investigative next time!

                                                              Side note, leo cafe, the convenience store/cafe in narita terminal 1 (?) has it..

                                                              1. re: blimpbinge

                                                                Excellent, something to do besides sitting in the KAL lounge.

                                                                Also, I thought you guys were talking about a complete absence of egg, not hard vs soft =.= So yes, everywhere I ordered egg, it was hanjuku.

                                                          2. re: Tripeler

                                                            it is usually only available at the very good high-end places.
                                                            ===============
                                                            So is there at least agreement that the better places have the hanjuku tamago? And the not so good places have the hard boiled eggs? Or is there an example of a top end ramen shop/chain in Japan serving hard boiled eggs?

                                                            1. re: Porthos

                                                              Well, having only lived in Tokyo since 1977, I am not really the expert that Blimpbinge is, but from my experience I have never seen a top-end ramen joint serving a hard-boiled egg. The soft-boiled to almost liquid yolks are pretty much the rule.

                                                              1. re: Tripeler

                                                                Coming from the guy that didn't know chin ma ya existed in japan until last week? i'm sure you remember all the details ;)

                                                                1. re: Tripeler

                                                                  haha, well there really aren't many rules for ramen shops. I have definitely seen hardboilded at highly rated/regarded shops (like high rating on Tabelog or RamedDB) and may have some pics of a bowl or two on my other PC. There are also shops that will give you a choice of which one

                                                                  In my (considerable) ramen eating experience the hanjuku thing kind of went into overdrive in the early '00s and now a lot of shops- "gourmet" and ones that fancy themselves "gourmet" will offer it. There used to be a lot of really just average neighborhoody ramen joints and hardboiled was the de facto standard- at least in Tokyo. Regional variations, like Tokushima style, used raw eggs or partially boiled. Anyway, as the ramen boom from the late '90s has evolved and a "kodawari" ethos of ramen culture has permeated everything in that business, hanjuku seems to become much more widely available.

                                                                  If you order ramen at many of the old school places or at Chuka places, where ramen used to be a popular item, you will probably still be getting a hardboiled egg... if any.

                                                                  1. re: Silverjay

                                                                    That was kind of my implication (without your impressive amount of detail :D), but people have either misread my original post or simply ignored my explanations.

                                                                    I said they are common, and as far as I'm concerned, they are.. since most of the shops I go to have it readily avail.

                                                                    Of course there will be shops that don't serve egg at all or don't care for it, but I saw more of the ones that did. I'm talking about ramen-ya's, not random restaurants that happens to serve ramen.

                                                                    Here's a pic of "very good high-end" airport terminal ramen not from a ramen-ya btw..

                                                                    1. re: blimpbinge

                                                                      O_O looks awesome.

                                                                      1. re: blimpbinge

                                                                        For those of us misreading blimpybinge's posts, here's a synopsis from where it all went downhill. Tripeler and I bow to your righteousness.

                                                                        "Medium boiled flavored eggs (hanjuku/ajitsuke tamago) are very common in japan, almost every shop I went to (that served ramen with eggs) had some form of it. I think out of all the shops i went, i could count the ones that had hard boiled eggs on one hand...To me, the lack of this is just laziness."

                                                                        "Like I said in the other post, a flavored medium boiled egg is pretty standard in japan. Standard as in, that's the way it is at most shops. I'd rather have them stick with how it's supposed to be done than to bow down to customer demands and start changing their recipe left and right."

                                                                        1. re: E Eto

                                                                          "Standard as in, that's the way it is at most shops. "

                                                                          I can see where it can be misinterpreted, but that really is my experience with shops there. I think it should be obvious that the statement does not include shops that do not serve eggs.

                                                                          I do want to retract this line, as I now see that it sounds ridiculous/untrue in the big picture, but it actually is sort of true for my trips:
                                                                          "i could count the ones that had hard boiled eggs on one hand"

                                                                          ok, two hands!

                                                                          1. re: blimpbinge

                                                                            >>...To me, the lack of this is just laziness.<<

                                                                            I think this is where it sealed the stepping off the curb into the...

                                                                      2. re: Silverjay

                                                                        Good seeing you again Silverjay.

                                                                        Always a pleasure to have you weigh in.

                                                          3. re: andrew_eats

                                                            Unlike PeterCC I have not seen restaurants that do both. It's usually one or the other. I don't think you can ask for a hard boiled one at Tsujita or a medium boiled one at Yamadaya (tried).

                                                            Maybe someone could provide a list of ramen places that does both? Would love to be wrong on this. I don't mind paying extra for the medium boiled egg.

                                                            1. re: Porthos

                                                              Kotoya's ramen bowls do not come with any egg but you can order either hard or medium.

                                                              Hayatemaru (in West LA at least but I'm assuming in Torrance as well) has several ramen that comes with an egg. On the menu, the photos always show a hard-boiled egg but you can request a medium-boiled egg instead (or in addition, I suppose).

                                                              Kotoya served the medium egg in the bowl, whole (haven't gotten their hard egg yet). Hayatemaru serves hard eggs in bowl and medium eggs usually separately (and cold), cut in half in both cases.

                                                              First pic Kotoya, second Hayatemaru.

                                                               
                                                               
                                                              1. re: Porthos

                                                                Jinya does (or did) both; half cook and full cook egg I believe is what they call it.

                                                                1. re: ns1

                                                                  it's the reason i've been going to jinya more often that yamadaya. you can always get the egg half cooked. yamadaya is always fully cooked now.

                                                                  1. re: cdub

                                                                    Jinya would be the perfect substitute if the noodles didn't soft so quickly.

                                                                    1. re: Porthos

                                                                      Try Hayatemaru. I'm assuming the Torrance location is closer than WLA to you, and again assuming that the preparation methods are the same, their noodles hold up quite well, their menma is excellent (IMO), and their hanjuku eggs are decent. Their gyozas are very good too.

                                                                      Just don't get their tsukemen; not like Tsujita's at all (broader noodles--almost linguini-like, really bitter shoyu broth). To bring it back to the debate above (heh), I have no idea which place's tsukemen is more authentic, but I would not order it at Hayatemaru again even if they were more authentic, and if that was all they served, I would not go back.

                                                                      1. re: PeterCC

                                                                        Been meaning to try it though I like the way the egg looks at Kotoya more in your pictures.

                                                                        Will do after I do the soba/tempura anago at Otafuku first so I can compare to I-naba :-)

                                                                        1. re: Porthos

                                                                          I've only been to Kotoya once, so I can't speak to their consistency, but yeah, it had the deep golden hue that I really like.

                                                                          Hayatemaru's a little inconsistent, but all within the medium-boiled range. The pic I posted previously was of their jjigae ramen, and was probably the most well done of the hanjuku eggs I've had there. It was the only time I've had it served in the soup too, so it may have been cooked further by the residual heat.

                                                                          In my less-than-serious showdown post between Kotoya and Hayatemaru (http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/896285) is a pic of the first hanjuku egg I had at Hayatemaru, and it was less well-done than the one in the pic above.

                                                                          1. re: PeterCC

                                                                            wow this got out of hand quickly. i knew i was going to invite trouble when i made that comment, lol. i just wanted to say that it's not fair to judge something on what it doesn't have. like if my hamburger didn't have tomatoes but it wasn't designed to be a burger with tomatoes. i thought ramen could be the same way.
                                                                            but no armchair moderating coming from me. you can say what you want to say.

                                                                            i had always thought the problem with serving hanjuku eggs in the US was for food safety, salmonella concerns and all that. i'm sure there's some sort of rules regarding undercooked eggs. in Japan they eat eggs raw in many ways, like over rice and stuff, so they probably have stricter safety when it comes to raising the chickens instead of here where the safety is focused on cooking it. if that were true, then i wouldn't be surprised if they have to be really strict when making the hanjuku egg. that was the initial reason why i thought hanjuku eggs took forever to come to ramen places here.

                                                                            funny thing about the salt comment, people's preference to salt can change depending on what their body is used too... some people need a lot of salt, but they can also slowly be weaned off of it and not need as much.

                                                                      2. re: Porthos

                                                                        order the thick noodles and ask for them hard. works like a charm.

                                                                        1. re: cdub

                                                                          Will give that a shot next time.

                                                                          1. re: cdub

                                                                            "order the thick noodles and ask for them hard. works like a charm."

                                                                            is this in reference to jinya?

                                                                            1. re: ns1

                                                                              yes.

                                                              2. re: Porthos

                                                                Is it possible to ask for eggs cooked to your specification?

                                                                1. re: Ernie

                                                                  While I have pretty strong opinions about how I like my food, I usually eat what I'm served and don't send things back to have it done my way.

                                                                  It's the way the chef and restaurant serves it. If I like it, I'll return. I not, I won't. Simple.

                                                                  1. re: Porthos

                                                                    I am not talking about sending things back, but specifying how you want your eggs prepared when you place the order. I think that is even more simple.

                                                                    1. re: Ernie

                                                                      If a restaurant offers both sure.

                                                                      But there isn't much point asking for a medium boiled egg at Santouka. I did ask for it at Yamadaya and they no longer carry it. I don't think the egg is something they can make on the spot as it takes time to marinate the egg so it's brown and flavorful throughout. It's not as simple as just asking for it.

                                                                      1. re: Porthos

                                                                        It takes about 5 minutes to make a medium boiled egg. I am very surprised any restaurant cannot accommodate such a simple request.

                                                                        1. re: Ernie

                                                                          Yes. But then it's white and not brown and flavored throughout.

                                                            2. what is the location/address? can't seem to pull it up with any searches.

                                                              2 Replies
                                                              1. re: dreamcast18

                                                                typo hell.

                                                                BamBiBu
                                                                1550 S Pacific Coast Hwy
                                                                Redondo Beach, CA 90277
                                                                http://www.yelp.com/biz/bambibu-redon...

                                                                1. re: TonyC

                                                                  thanks TonyC! will try it this week.

                                                              2. went on Saturday evening. Broth was great for both the shio and shoyu ramen. Had the hard boiled egg..which is so-so. Gyzoas were good and so was the potato fries.

                                                                was too hungry to take any pics. Cheese cake was decent too.

                                                                2 Replies
                                                                1. re: dreamcast18

                                                                  How were the noodles? Thick? Thin? Chewy?

                                                                  Thanks for the report!

                                                                  1. re: Porthos

                                                                    they serve both thick and thin...al dante!