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"Coq au Vin" with chicken breasts?

fldhkybnva Apr 20, 2013 10:49 AM

I love the flavor combination of coq au vin but does anyone have any quick recipe adaptations for chicken breasts. Should I just cook for a shorter time so that they don't get tough?

  1. Jay F Apr 20, 2013 10:55 AM

    Which kind? Boneless/Skinless (BSCB) or Bone In/Skin On (BISOCB)?

    I would use the latter, and I would give everything else in the recipe time to cook, minus the exact amount of time they need before adding the BISOCBs, such that there's no overcooked white meat.

    You can sear the skin a little before adding to your "au vin" mixture.

    More simply, I pan fry BSCBs, then make a pan sauce with wine. Most of my veg prep is done before so it can all come out at the same time.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Jay F
      fldhkybnva Apr 20, 2013 10:59 AM

      BSCB (btw I like the acronyms very useful) so I guess I'd go with the latter option.

      1. re: fldhkybnva
        weezieduzzit Apr 20, 2013 11:00 AM

        I think it will lack the richness that the long cooking with the bones gives it. That doesn't mean it won't be good, it just probably won't be as good.

        1. re: fldhkybnva
          Jay F Apr 20, 2013 11:02 AM

          Oh, yeah. I wouldn't put BSCB in Coq au Vin. But consider the veg that goes in, and make them separately. I like mushrooms, potatoes, and carrots in CaV. (Is it you who hates cooked carrots? Make green beans. You can always use a little green.)

      2. grampart Apr 20, 2013 10:56 AM

        I've done it a few times when I had the chicken breasts in the freezer and wanted to use them up. I mostly "wing it", but hete's a recipe that sounds like what I do.

        http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/qui...

        1. m
          middleagedfoodie Apr 20, 2013 10:58 AM

          If you search Epicurious, there are two recipes called Quick Coq Au Vin. One of them is made with boneless breasts. I've never made it, so I can't tell you how good it is, but the other recipe calls for parts. I've made that one with just bone in thighs and drumsticks. It is easy, relatively quick and pretty good.

          1. f
            foodieX2 Apr 20, 2013 11:03 AM

            Bon Appetit had a recipe that used breasts a few years ago. I made it and found it needed a little more punch. I think it was missing the fat/flavor that you usually get with thighs and legs. I ended up swirling some unsalted butter into the sauce and it greatly improved the flavor. I made again a few month later and used a nice fruity pinot noir and it was even better.

            I googled and it's still one line. I had completely forgotten about it!
            http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/qui...

            1. Atomic76 Apr 20, 2013 03:44 PM

              You may way to try cooking it in a pressure cooker. I've thrown raw chicken breasts in there with broth and vegetables before and got some pretty tender chicken out of it. I would start off at about 12 minutes once it reaches pressure. If the skin is still on them, definitely brown it first.

              1. C. Hamster Apr 20, 2013 09:00 PM

                Marinate the hell out of them because you can only cook them for a very brief time

                1. b
                  bikepixi Apr 20, 2013 10:24 PM

                  I normally use a fool proof nigel slater recipe and use skin on/bone in chicken thighs:

                  http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyl...

                  If you wanted to speed up the time you could add good quality chicken stock to replace the flavours you would loose by cooking plain breast meat.

                  Whilst browning off your other ingredients you could brown your chicken and remove, then reduce your wine and chicken stock in a separate pan (I'd try a large frying pan/skillet to maximise the area for evaporation). When you are happy with your consistency add it the the veg pot and then add your chicken and finish cooking the chicken meat.

                  1. r
                    roro808 Apr 21, 2013 01:51 AM

                    Unless you use the more flavorful organic breasts, I would slowly braise it with low heat in order for the flavor to permeate. Or best yet, eat it the next day--will taste so much better.

                    1. h
                      Harters Apr 21, 2013 03:37 AM

                      Just cook for a shorter time. You'll lose something of the flavour you'd get from long cooking but it's no big deal.

                      1. p
                        Puffin3 Apr 21, 2013 07:02 AM

                        The point of ccv is to use an old bird to develop flavor/texture that only an old bird can provide. Why not just make a reduction to pour over the cbs? Some fine diced sweet onion/spring of fresh herb/s sauteed in clarifed butter then deglaze with some decent reduced down red wine. Lapped with some cold butter.

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