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Top 10 Sandwiches In Los Angeles

For better or worse, these listings seem to be what "sells" in the food press.

http://www.menuism.com/blog/top-ten-s...

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  1. My breakfast consisted of two pieces of LaBrea Bakery wholewheat bread, toasted with 3 slices of pan fried, center cut bacon that was so thick it reminded me of ham. Add one ripe mashed up avocado and some extra garlicky aoli + some pureed red peppers. That was the top sandwich for me this week...

    17 Replies
    1. re: Servorg

      I had a great tuna sandwich at Whole Foods on Third and Fairfax. I ordered it on a kalamata olive ciabatta with mustard and Mayo, lettuce, tomates and pickles. Damn good for $7.99, considering it came from a grocery store, albeit freshly made.

      1. re: Miri1

        My great tuna sandwich is from Belwood Bakery on Barrington Court in Brentwood. They put their tuna salad on homemade ciabatta. Price is $7.50. They sell tons of that tuna every day.

        1. re: maudies5

          Who makes tuna with no hardboiled egg, not swimming in mayo, and lots of pickle relish? Celery I can take or leave, as long as it is finely chopped and not dominant...

          1. re: nosh

            Who makes tuna salad w hard boiled egg?! That has no business being in a tuna salad......

            1. re: nosh

              Try Belwood Bakery. Light on mayo, no discernible relish, definitely no hard boiled egg. I love it. They also sell it sans bread. I like that I can throw it on some greens. If familiar with Brentwood, Belwood is directly across from Peppone. They also make a damn good ham and cheese sandwich on their homemade ciabatta.

              1. re: maudies5

                Yes, I know where it is, thanks, I will, I like buying tuna salad on its own once in a while. My kids used to love Gelson's version, with scallion and herbs, light on the mayo. Now for whatever reason, the oldest just likes it the way I make it for him, mayo & celery only, and the youngest wants nothing to do with it. Go figure.....

              2. re: nosh

                Sounds like you like your tuna relatively simple. Huckleberry's version might work. Don't hold me to the exact recipe but tuna, parsley, red onion, capers and maybe some lemon juice? Real basic.

                1. re: bulavinaka

                  Sometimes, when I'm in the mood for the most basic,m ayo laden tuna sandwich, I head over to Astro burger on Sanra Monica Blvd. Grilled on whute with tomato and I think lettuce. Damn, that can be pureccomfort food.

                      1. re: bulavinaka

                        So I'm left with making my own. Albacore or white solid tuna in cans with wather and no salt added, maybe TJ. A bit of mayo. A lot of pickle relish. Won't bother with celery. Haven't tried onion. Serve with sliced vine tomato, maybe leaf or iceberg lettuce, lightly toasted bread (bacon?!!) or a Bay Cities roll.

                        What is with the miniscule size of tuna cans?!? Now 5 oz, used to be 6-1/2 when I last bought tuna 3-1/2 years ago. That is an almost 30% reduction.

                        1. re: nosh

                          Switch to good oil-packed tuna. Makes all the difference in the world.

                          1. re: maudies5

                            I can do that. I used to buy oil-packed. Switched when most of tuna was bought for a tuna (rice) casserole.

                            1. re: nosh

                              Nosh, have you ever had the Charlie Tuna sandwich at Original Rinaldi's? Sort of fits the general description of what you are looking for. http://theoriginalrinaldis.com/menu.html
                              It's the third sandwich down in the cold specialty sandwich column. The El Segundo location has round rolls somebody supplies them and the Manhattan Beach location makes a couple of different rolls onsite. The breads are pretty soft, so you might ask them to toast the rolls. Customer service has been good at both locations for me. They seem to be flexible if you want to request some minor changes.

                          2. re: nosh

                            In place of onion or celery, I add a wafer-thin slice of fennel bulb. Or a bit of chopped fresh dill frond into the mayo...

                            1. re: nosh

                              A few drops of soy sauce, and a squeeze of lemon.

              3. I thought Boos was good but, not Top 10 good.

                4 Replies
                  1. re: ns1

                    Are you both saying not top 10 for Philly Cheesesteaks in the LA area, or not top 10 for the All Sandwich category?

                    1. re: Servorg

                      I would say top 2 for cheesesteaks in the LA area (I have no idea who #1 is but I haven't eaten every cheesesteak in LA to find out; but I have eaten many)

                      I don't agree that it's a top 10 sandwich, only because there are so many good sandwiches in LA.

                      Their hoagie was also pretty good, but honestly I prefer Jersey Mike's. YMMV.

                  2. The Griddle Cafe's grilled shrimp, bacon, lettuce, avocado and tomato sandwich with chipotle cream, all atop grilled french bread. The shrimp and bacon are stuffed to overflowing, and the ripe avocado slices ooze out everywhere. Huge, crunchy and creamy all at once...

                    1. Where's EuroPane's egg salad sandwich?

                      1. my take is that the title should have been best sandwiches on the west side.

                        4 Replies
                        1. re: barryc

                          IMHO 5/10 are not in or at least debateable whether they are in the Westside.

                          1. re: bulavinaka

                            "I love a good Vietnamese sandwich but have little desire to journey to the San Gabriel Valley to appease my need for the unique and distinctive combo of lemongrass beef, pickled carrots and daikon, cilantro, jalapeno on crusty French bread."

                            i don't know how that plays to you, but that SCREAMS of west side bias to me.

                            1. re: barryc

                              I do the drive at least one weekend a month - every weekend during a good month - for the food. Most don't. It's an issue of practicality. I choose my times - leave by 0930 and I'm in SGV in 30-40 minutes. Street traffic in SGV gets very congested by midday as well. About the only streets that seem to have good flow are Las Tunas and Huntington. Garvey, Garfield, Atlantic and of course Valley are parking lots by 1230. This makes the drive back horrendous - usually 1 1/2 hours back. Doing this during the work week or in the early evenings is even worse both ways. It's the traffic that is the major obstacle for most folks - not Westside bias.

                              Nong La is a very worthy option for Vietnamese food, particularly their banh mi. If you've tried their versions, you should understand. If you haven't, then I'd encourage you to do so.

                              1. re: bulavinaka

                                Thank you for illustrating that point very well. And I've tried to go to Nong La several times and can never seem to find a parking spot, or have time to wait in line for a bahn mi. Hence, I make my own.