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Cake recommendations?

Looking for a cake for a wedding, but don't need an actual wedding cake. I.e. we don't care about having a fancy multi-tiered wedding cake, just a small one we can cut into together for ceremonial purposes and eat ourselves later. We'll feed our guests other desserts. Anyone have recommendations for small, super delicious cakes? I don't think we're particular about type or flavor. Just one that's not too sweet and isn't overloaded with frosting. Also trying to avoid traditional wedding cake bakeries since markups on wedding stuff tends to be ridiculous. Maybe one from Susie Cakes? Or an asian bakery?

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  1. If the East Bay isn't too far afield, Katrina Rozelle, Masse's, or (my personal favorite--and her East European style would make them the least trad in the wedding arena) Crixa Cakes would all do a lovely job--delicious (underscored), not too sweet, not overloaded w/ frosting.

    4 Replies
      1. re: sundeck sue

        I'd agree with Crixa, as long as you stay with the rustic-type cakes, and not the ones in the refrigerator case.

          1. re: sundeck sue

            I love both Masse's and Crixa's cakes. They are both stellar at their craft.

            I don't know about Crixa, but Masse's accomodated a special request to modify one of their cakes for us. Chocolate hazelnut ganache... It was a beauty, and incredibly delicious.

          2. Came here to recommend Crixa and see I'm not the first one...

            1. Susie Cakes makes overly sweet cakes in my opinion.

              I would suggest a Princess Cake (Victoria, Schuberts, or Fillmore) even though you're trying to avoid anything traditional, they're reasonable.

              Stella Bakery makes some classic whip cream cakes. something old fashioned like a St. Honore might be more traditional, but at least it's not a 4 tier dollhouse purse shaped cake.

              Going even more non-traditional, the hybrid ice cream cakes from Bi-Rite or Humphrey Slocombe could be interesting, unless you plan on displaying the cake.

              Chili's pies is now making cakes that look and sound good, as an alternative to Susie Cakes.

              One really cheap place for a nice classic sheet cake is Sunset Bakery (it's Asian owned, but it's standard cake). Dianda's is probably another good place for a good price.

              4 Replies
              1. re: sugartoof

                A princess cake might work well, it looks like a fancy frosted cake but it's all marzipan, pastry cream, and whipped cream.

                1. re: sugartoof

                  Schubert's makes great sheet and round cakes which they'll decorate with beautiful chocolate flowers upon request, no extra charge. I think they give the most bang for the buck of the bakeries mentioned. But if taste is truly what you're after, b. patisserie is making the most delicious things these days. From a looks standpoint, Craftsmen & Wolves, is doing some very inventive things.

                  1. re: rubadubgdub

                    I love C&W but so far mostly the breads and muffins more than the fancy, pricy, creamy things in the refrigerated cases. What cakes have you liked there.

                    Schubert's Princess case is lovely.

                  2. Bump. Other ideas?

                    Yasukochi's Sweet Stop does a 50 person sheet cake for $105, and a 100 person sheet cake for $213
                    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/31912

                    I forgot the quote I got from Stella Bakery for their Sacrapantina cake, but it came to over a dollar per slice more than the $4.50 a slice they charge at the shop!

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: hyperbowler

                      Note that the Sacrapantina will be delivered frozen, and sometimes it doesn't thaw out by service time.

                      1. re: Melanie Wong

                        Pass on Masse's cakes. Admittedly it was at least five years ago, but in a pinch I had to buy my mother-in-law's 75th BD cake. I usually do all homemade cakes and pastries. It was a dense chocolate - her favorite. It had obviously had been frozen (most cakes are) and it was very dry and not very chocolatey.
                        I love Fournee croissants (not something I care to make). I have not tried their cakes, but it might be worth a try before you actually order the cake.

                      2. re: hyperbowler

                        The slices at the shop are about half the size compared to when they were closer to a standard Napoleon size, so I'd wonder how they're doing their slice count. I guess you could order 50 slices, and ask for them uncut in a sheet. You're probably paying for the special order. Stella isn't baking like they used to. Sacrapantina cake is still hard to beat.

                      3. Anyone know where to get a croquembouche these days? Is Noe Valley Bakery still doing them?

                        5 Replies
                        1. re: Torina

                          Le Bedaine in Berkeley has made them in the past. Worth a call, and pls let us know what you find out.

                          1. re: Melanie Wong

                            Good thought ... I called and said they will not do a full size because "it needs to be created on site to get a cone shape", but suggested that they could do a St Honore with the caramel ... 11" diameter round, 2-3 puffs high.

                            1. re: Torina

                              Torina, did La Bedaine give you a quote for the modified croquembouche?

                            1. re: Torina

                              Noe Valley Bakery had them last year, at least.
                              Pretty sure Bi-Rite carries them too, in the refrigerator section near the pies.