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How do you like your garlic?

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I am a garlic fiend and usually will eat it in any form with delight, but I've never thought about any preferences for a particular form. Well, tonight I made chicken with 40 cloves of garlic and while it's a fabulous dish it seems that I'm not into whole roasted cloves although I often rub a schmear of roasted garlic on chicken but I imagine that's in lower quantities. However, I love raw garlic and often throw it in last in sauteed dishes so that it's still quite raw. Now I know, I'm a garlic fan of all types, but I'm really a raw garlic fan. Do you have a favorite way to eat garlic?

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  1. Whole cloves, raw, with jalapeno slices, and dipped in ssamjang. With or without the meat and loose leaf lettuce.

    1 Reply
    1. re: hannaone

      I agree on the raw.I throw it in the cooked pasta and onto garlic bread towards the very end.Love the fiery bite it has.Roasted is tolerable but love it raw.Love raw burn your throat onion too.

    2. I love to include a good amount of raw garlic when I make blue cheese dressing. Gives it a nice snap.
      I had a recipe from the Chicago Trubune ages ago for garlic mashed potatoes that had something like 20 cloves of garlic par-boiled in the potato water to soften them up, and then another 16 raw cloves grated into the mashed potatoes at the end. I lost the recipe, but I do want to try it again. I know it was really good.

      1. Many cloves, pressed ( or chopped very finely) into some soft butter , mixed up, and spread onto crusty real SF sourdough, which I then broil. Garlic toast, IOW.

        Sounds great right now. Too bad I'm almost 600 miles away from that sourdough.

        1. Raw in very small amounts pressed into bread or pizza dough but mostly I enjoy garlic roasted. Once it becomes a soft paste of flavor I really enjoy it then.

          1. I love fried garlic slivers. Like there was this Korean place I used to eat at in Dubai. When we ordered table top grilling, along with the meats, they gave us a little tin foil cup of oil and garlic slices that you put on the grill and after sometime they are crispy garlic chips! Mmmmh!

            I make garlic sliver crisps for tempering moong-masoor daal. <3 and also for using as a garnish on some foods just for fun.

            I also love Indian garlic chutneys where the ground garlic has been fried with red chile and cumin or other spices and is done when the oil rises out of the mixture. (It's kind of like harissa.) It can be caustically hot but sweet and garlicky from the heavy garlic component. Heavenly stuff just mashed into some white rice.

            I am not a fan of raw garlic and often do tricks to reduce it's sharpness in dishes where it won't be cooked. Like I put a tooth of it in a bowl of water in the microwave for 1 minutes, then add it to my humus, eggplant mash, salad dressing, raita, or what have you. Then you get the garlic depth without the raw pungency.

            1. Whole cloves. Raw, and peeled.

              Au natural.

              Simple. Is. Best.

              1. Like you chowhounders I too love garlic, but when making something like mojo di ajo, peeling four heads of garlic gets old.

                I don't know if this method for peeling garlic (http://screen.yahoo.com/chowciao-peel...) is commonly known, but I just saw it and tried it and it really works. Happy peeling!

                1 Reply
                1. re: HeBrew

                  Thanks! I spent a good bit of my life peeling 40 cloves of garlic last night. However, it was much faster than I thought it would be surprisingly.

                2. sauteed. nearly anything i saute, garlic is in it.

                  1. Only on the opposite ends of the cooked spectrum -- raw or caramelized.

                    As mentioned downthread, I love Korean garlic when at a grilling place and it becomes essentially a garlic chip or a dark dark spreadable paste ["meat boopay" was what my co-workers called those places in Seoul].

                    Or, raw, usually sliced thin. [dare I call it "julienned"?] and tossed into things last minute like dressings or cream cheese or cottage cheese or salads or homemade mayonnaise [does that make it an aioli then?].

                    1. i love it roasted as whole cloves or ever so slightly cooked in simple stir fried greens.